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Ebola: Keeping Perspective

clock October 17, 2014 08:21 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Our NursingCenter team has been following the Ebola outbreak closely over the past months, but with recent developments of disease transmission here in the United States, media coverage has increased and protocols and recommendations are being closely examined. As nurses, we play an important role in patient and public education, and it is important that we continue to act with compassion and skill while gathering our knowledge from reputable sources and keeping recent developments in perspective.

Nina and Amber
My thanks and best wishes for a quick recovery go out to Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, two nurses who contracted the Ebola virus while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, the infected patient who died on Oct. 8, 2014.  I commend your dedication and compassion. I am proud of you.

Nurses and other healthcare providers
To those of you caring for Nina and Amber, those already in or heading to West Africa to help with the outbreak there, and those studying current guidelines and possible systems issues, thank you. I am confident that your hard work will make a difference here and abroad, and that best practices for the safety of patients, health care providers, and the public is the priority. 

Stay informed
As a nurse, I will continue to look to professional organizations for the latest information and guidance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a long list of guidelines and checklists for U.S. health professionals. The Global Alert and Response of the World Health Organization includes up-to-date news and facts, frequently asked questions, and preparedness guidance. The National Institutes of Health also lists facts about the virus as well as the latest developments of research on prevention, treatment, and detection. 

I encourage you all to stay up-to-date and share your knowledge with your patients and the public. Refer to the sites above or to our Ebola page on NursingCenter (which we update daily with information from the above sites). Our colleagues at the American Journal of Nursing have also shared valuable insights from a nurse epidemiologist, who addresses the concerns surrounding personal protective equipment, and a nurse informaticist, who looks at the role of electronic health records in handling the Ebola outbreak.

Moving forward
I had the pleasure of spending the past week at Nursing Management Congress and was in the company of over 800 nurse leaders from around the country as the news of Ebola virus transmission in the U.S. unfolded. Themes from the general sessions included a focus on restoring pride in nursing, believing in team members, and dealing with root causes instead of putting out fires. I think these themes are appropriate as we face this new challenge in health care. 



CSASWC 2014

clock October 7, 2014 03:58 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

What a pleasure it was to spend some sunny days in Las Vegas last week for the Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care! From the General Sessions and Breakout Sessions to the Exhibit Hall and Poster Presentations, there was much learning and networking going on! Here are some highlights from the conference…

Clinical Pearls
“Most pressure ulcers are avoidable; not all pressure ulcers are unavoidable.”
What About Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers is Unavoidable?
Diane K. Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN & Laura Edsberg, PhD

“Forty-five percent of all adverse drug reactions are manifested in the skin.”
Skin and Wound Assessment from a Dermatologic Perspective
Mary Gloeckner, MS, RN, CWON, APN & Jennifer Gloeckner Powers, MD

“Controlled inflammation is beneficial to wound healing.”
MMPs and How Collagen Balances Them to Break the Chronic Cycle of ECM Degradation 
Gregory Bohn, MD, FACS, FACHM & Greg Schultz, PhD

“No wound is going to heal on a swollen limb.”
Navigating Current Practices in the Treatment of Skin Tears
Kimberly LeBlanc, MN, RN, CETN(C) & Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, MAPWCA, FAAN

Poster Winners
Category: HBOT
Poster #42: Clinical Effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Authors: Supaporn Opasanon, MD, Warut Pongsapich, MD, Dr Med, Sitthichoke Taweepraditpol, MD, Bhoom Suktitipat, MD, PhD and Apirag Chuangsuwanich, MD

Category: Education/Systems/Other
Poster #128: Identifying Cocaine-Induced Necrosis
Author: Nancy Bodycote, RN, BSN, CWCN

Category: Original Investigations
Poster #82: Strict Protocol-Based Approach to Treat Pressure Ulcers in Spinal Cord Injury Patients – An Outcome Analysis
Authors: Umar H. Choudry, MD, Mary Murphy, RN, MA, CWOCN, Ryan Mello, PhD, and Jean Dominique Morancy, MD

Category: Case Study/Series
Poster #77: Surgical Incision Management System with Customizable Dressing Following Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction
Authors: Allen Gabriel, MD and Steven Sigalove, MD

Exhibit Hall

Exhibit hall hours allowed us to connect, network, and dine with colleagues, attendees, and exhibitors. You can see more photos from this event here

 

Hope to see you next year in New Orleans! 

 




What are all those letters and how can I get them?

clock September 14, 2014 09:07 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

BSN, RN-C, APHN-BC, PPCNP-BC, DNP… There are so many opportunities for furthering your nursing education. Whether it’s achieving a new academic degree or getting certified in your specialty, we’ve got resources to share with you! Take some time to explore these FREE resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter!

Focus On: Achieving Your BSN
Learn why now is the time to return to school, and gain advice on overcoming barriers that are in your way. 

Focus On: Achieving Your Advanced Nursing Degree
With options such as online programs and employer-based incentives, achieving an advanced degree in nursing is within reach. 

Nursing Certification Boards By Specialty
Certification in a nursing specialty demonstrates a commitment to advancing one’s knowledge and skillset. 

Good luck to you in your future educational endeavors!



Enterovirus-D68

clock September 8, 2014 08:34 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

In the Midwest,  an enterovirus, known as EV-D68, is causing concern. While not a new virus, EV-D68 has recently caused severe respiratory symptoms in affected children in Missouri, and several other states have contacted the CDC for assistance with a possible regional outbreak as well. These are Colorado, North Carolina, Georgia, Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Kentucky. Symptoms of a common cold are typical at the onset of EV-D68, however the development of fever, rash, or dyspnea – particularly in children with asthma – is occurring and necessitating hospitalization, and in some instances, ICU admission. 

While details continue to be released, please remember your role in patient education and infection control. Tell parents and caregivers about these symptoms of EV-D68 and advise them to seek care for their child if fever, rash, or breathing difficulties develop. Also, share these basics of infection control:

  • avoiding close contact with people who have respiratory symptoms, such as coughing or sneezing
  • staying home when sick
  • washing hands often with soap and water for 15 to 20 seconds or using alcohol-based hand cleansers 
  • not touching eyes, nose, or mouth 
  • keeping surfaces and objects (especially tables, counters, doorknobs, and toys) that can be exposed to a virus clean
  • practicing other good health habits, including getting plenty of sleep, staying active, drinking plenty of fluids, and eating healthy foods

As more details are released, we’ll be sure to keep you informed! 

Update 9/16/14 - More states have reported EV-D68 infections. Please visit our page on this topic for more information and resources!

Reference:

Bonsall, L. (2009). Be prepared for H1N1 flu. Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, 7(6).




Suicide assessment – an important nursing responsibility

clock August 20, 2014 09:09 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

As we continue to mourn the loss of Robin Williams, an iconic entertainer and comedian, it’s important for us to take a step toward learning from his death. As nurses, our responsibilities to our patients are numerous, but we know that safety is a number one priority. Even if we don’t routinely care for patients with mental illness, patients that we encounter may have a mental illness of which we are unaware. Some patients may have an undiagnosed or newly diagnosed disorder that may increase their suicide risk, whether due to its pathophysiology or its impact on quality of life. In nursing school, we learned about suicidal ideation and how to do a suicide assessment. I’d like to share some resources from our journals with you to revisit this important topic.

 

Assessing patients for suicide risk
Nursing2010 

Suicide Prevention in Neurology Patients: Evidence to Guide Practice
Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

All along the watchtower: Suicide risk screening, a pilot study 
Nursing Management

As If the Cancer Wasn't Enough... A Case Study of Depression in Terminal Illness
Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing

Additional Resources
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
National Alliance on Mental Illness
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Directory of support groups



Read these award-winners!

clock July 3, 2014 01:33 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Last month, 21 Apex Awards were presented to journals published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. These awards are based on “excellence in graphic design, editorial content and the ability to achieve overall communications excellence.” The award-winning articles from our nursing journals are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you!

Shining a Light on Hoarding Disorder
Nursing2013

Responding To an Active Shooter and Other Threats of Violence 
Nursing2013

25th Annual Legislative Update: Evidence-Based Practice Reforms Improve Access to APRN Care 
The Nurse Practitioner: The American Journal of Primary Health Care 

The Hard Truth about Human Trafficking 
Nursing Management

IT Extra: Technology Management Strategies for Nurse Leaders  
Nursing Management

Smart Management: Recruitment And Retention: How To Get Them And How To Keep Them
OR Nurse 2013

Smart Management: High reliability Organizations: An Idea Worth Pursuing 
OR Nurse 2013

Smart Management: Build Your Staff's Leadership Skills 
OR Nurse 2013

Managing Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
OR Nurse 2013

Editorial: A Grassroots Movement Sounds the Call 
American Journal of Nursing



Cover Image from January 2014 issue of American Journal of Nursing


January 2013 issue of Nursing2013 Critical Care



Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents For the U.N.

clock June 19, 2014 10:22 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

On May 16th, Dr. Anne Dabrow Woods, Chief Nurse of Wolters Kluwer Medical Research and the publisher of American Journal of Nursing and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) at Wolters Kluwer, was a special guest speaker for the United Nations and the World Health Organization on “E-health: Using Technology to Improve Global Public Health” during the Global Classrooms® International Model United Nations 2014. In attendance at the three-day conference were 2,300 students from more than 20 nations. The event was held at United Nations Headquarters and the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City.

During her presentation, Anne discussed the importance of access to evidence-based practice resources from global collaborations such as JBI and exposed future policymakers to the principles of evidence-based practice. Anne fielded over 20 delegate questions, including the impact of "Big Pharma"  policies on global health, ensuring clean water, food and sanitation as foundations for health in developing nations, and how new technologies, such as apps and robots, are changing healthcare practice today. 

Submitted by:
Janet Feeney
Senior Marketing Manager
Medical Research
Wolters Kluwer



Celebrate Nursing 2014: Part 2

clock May 30, 2014 07:44 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I hope that 2014 has been a good year so far! It’s hard to believe we are heading into June soon and it's time to look ahead to nursing recognition days, weeks, and months for the second half of the year. (You can see what we’ve already celebrated this year in Celebrate Nursing 2014 Part 1).  

Vascular Nursing Week
June 8-14 

National Time Out Day
June 11  

37th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week
June 12-19  

Healthcare Risk Management Week
June 16-20  

National Nurses in Staff Development Week
July 15-19

National Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses Day
September 8  

Nephrology Nurses Week
September 14-20 

National Neonatal Nurses Day
September 15  

Gerontological Nursing Week
September 29-October 3  

National Midwifery Week
October 5-11 

Emergency Nurses Week
October 5-11 (Emergency Nurses Day is October 8) 

National Pediatric Nursing Week
October 6-12 

National Case Management Week
October 12-18  

National Hospice/Palliative Care Month
November 

Urology Nurses and Associates Week
November 1-7  

Medical-Surgical Nurses Week
November 2-8 

Emerging Nurse Leaders Week
November 2-8 

Perioperative Nurses Week
November 9-15 

National Nurse Practitioner Week
November 9-15 

Forensic Nurses Week
November 10-14 

Remember to celebrate yourselves and your colleagues! 



The ‘Threat’ of NPs: An NCNP 2014 Wrap-Up

clock May 5, 2014 07:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

It’s been a little over a week since the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners in Chicago, and I am reviewing my notes and reminded of the learning and networking that took place during the conference. On my very first page, from the Welcome and Opening Remarks of Conference Chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, SCP, FAAN, DCC, I had written the following: 

I remember this point vividly, as Dr. Fitzgerald had commented that years ago, when our numbers were much smaller, not too many people had an issue with nurse practitioners practicing to the full extent of our education and training. Now however, as there are over 180,000 nurse practitioners, the power of our numbers is threatening to many, even despite recent research demonstrating our value in patient outcomes and satisfaction. This point is incredibly evident in this recent Op Ed piece from The New York Times, Nurses are not Doctors, where the author cites a study from 1999 to support his opinion, which is clearly not the most up-to-date, best available evidence. Have you read it? I encourage you to do so when you are sitting down, because it did bring out a bit of my temper. Rest assured that some leaders in nursing did reply with some Letters to the Editor and you can read them here

And now back to some take-aways from NCNP…

*The states with the least restrictive NP regulations see twice as many patients as those in other states.
Carol L. Thompson, PhD, DNP, ACNP, FNP, FCCM, FAANP
Keynote Address: Awesome Practiced Daily

*Don’t use an ARB and ACE inhibitor concomitantly to treat hypertension.
Joyce L. Ross, MSN, CRNP, CLS, FNLA, FPCNA
JNC-Late: A Focus and Update on the Long-Awaited Hypertension Guidelines

*Not all infected patients are febrile and not all febrile patients are infected.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*If a patient has an inappropriate tachycardia related to his elevated temperature, consider pulmonary embolism as the cause.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*Sepsis doesn’t kill patients; multisystem organ failure resulting from sepsis does.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*If a patient has kidney injury, used unfractionated heparin for DVT prophylaxis.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*Our patients give us very important information, if we listen!
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*If a patient has loss of the hair that makes up the outer eyebrows, think hypothyroidism. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*The presence of pulsus paradoxus is a sign of cardiac tamponade, but can also be seen in severe asthma.
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*To assess judgment in patients with traumatic brain injury, ask “What would you do if there was a fire in your kitchen?”
Tracey Andersen, MSN, CNRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC
Neuro Assessment and Diagnostic Work-up for Advanced Practitioners

Thanks for reading this wrap-up! Want to see photos from the event? Here’s our album – enjoy! 



The American Nurse Project

clock April 25, 2014 01:25 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

During a discussion with several nurses last night, we acknowledged the importance of nurses having a passion for the profession, and how this passion makes a difference in patient care. When I view the trailer for The American Nurse: Healing America, I feel the passion in the voices of those nurses featured. I can only imagine the impact that viewing this entire feature documentary will have. It premieres during National Nurses Week and I am really looking forward to seeing it! 

In 2012, Carolyn Jones, a photographer and filmmaker, traveled across the United States documenting the work of nurses. Her book, The American Nurse, was published that year and includes portraits, interviews, and biographies of nurses she encountered on her journey. An interview with Jones reveals her passion for this project, despite not being a nurse herself. She states, “Nursing is real. I'm fascinated by how a nurse can help all different people, even people that have committed terrible crimes, with the same compassion that they can treat a friend.” She learned a lot during her conversations with nurses and her journey is bringing our important work into the eyes of the public. For that, I am grateful. 

I will leave you with this powerful quote from the mission of The American Nurse Project: 

“At some point in our life each of us will encounter a nurse, whether it be as a patient or as a loved one. And that one encounter can mean the difference between suffering and peace; between chaos and order. Nurses matter.

I hope that many of you will get the opportunity to see this film. You can find a list of theaters here. I look forward to hearing what you think! 



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