NursingCenter.com

NursingCenter’s In the Round

A dialog by nurses, for nurses
NursingCenter.com

CSASWC 2014

clock October 7, 2014 03:58 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

What a pleasure it was to spend some sunny days in Las Vegas last week for the Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care! From the General Sessions and Breakout Sessions to the Exhibit Hall and Poster Presentations, there was much learning and networking going on! Here are some highlights from the conference…

Clinical Pearls
“Most pressure ulcers are avoidable; not all pressure ulcers are unavoidable.”
What About Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers is Unavoidable?
Diane K. Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN & Laura Edsberg, PhD

“Forty-five percent of all adverse drug reactions are manifested in the skin.”
Skin and Wound Assessment from a Dermatologic Perspective
Mary Gloeckner, MS, RN, CWON, APN & Jennifer Gloeckner Powers, MD

“Controlled inflammation is beneficial to wound healing.”
MMPs and How Collagen Balances Them to Break the Chronic Cycle of ECM Degradation 
Gregory Bohn, MD, FACS, FACHM & Greg Schultz, PhD

“No wound is going to heal on a swollen limb.”
Navigating Current Practices in the Treatment of Skin Tears
Kimberly LeBlanc, MN, RN, CETN(C) & Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, MAPWCA, FAAN

Poster Winners
Category: HBOT
Poster #42: Clinical Effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Authors: Supaporn Opasanon, MD, Warut Pongsapich, MD, Dr Med, Sitthichoke Taweepraditpol, MD, Bhoom Suktitipat, MD, PhD and Apirag Chuangsuwanich, MD

Category: Education/Systems/Other
Poster #128: Identifying Cocaine-Induced Necrosis
Author: Nancy Bodycote, RN, BSN, CWCN

Category: Original Investigations
Poster #82: Strict Protocol-Based Approach to Treat Pressure Ulcers in Spinal Cord Injury Patients – An Outcome Analysis
Authors: Umar H. Choudry, MD, Mary Murphy, RN, MA, CWOCN, Ryan Mello, PhD, and Jean Dominique Morancy, MD

Category: Case Study/Series
Poster #77: Surgical Incision Management System with Customizable Dressing Following Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction
Authors: Allen Gabriel, MD and Steven Sigalove, MD

Exhibit Hall

Exhibit hall hours allowed us to connect, network, and dine with colleagues, attendees, and exhibitors. You can see more photos from this event here

 

Hope to see you next year in New Orleans! 

 




Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents For the U.N.

clock June 19, 2014 10:22 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

On May 16th, Dr. Anne Dabrow Woods, Chief Nurse of Wolters Kluwer Medical Research and the publisher of American Journal of Nursing and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) at Wolters Kluwer, was a special guest speaker for the United Nations and the World Health Organization on “E-health: Using Technology to Improve Global Public Health” during the Global Classrooms® International Model United Nations 2014. In attendance at the three-day conference were 2,300 students from more than 20 nations. The event was held at United Nations Headquarters and the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City.

During her presentation, Anne discussed the importance of access to evidence-based practice resources from global collaborations such as JBI and exposed future policymakers to the principles of evidence-based practice. Anne fielded over 20 delegate questions, including the impact of "Big Pharma"  policies on global health, ensuring clean water, food and sanitation as foundations for health in developing nations, and how new technologies, such as apps and robots, are changing healthcare practice today. 

Submitted by:
Janet Feeney
Senior Marketing Manager
Medical Research
Wolters Kluwer



The ‘Threat’ of NPs: An NCNP 2014 Wrap-Up

clock May 5, 2014 07:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

It’s been a little over a week since the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners in Chicago, and I am reviewing my notes and reminded of the learning and networking that took place during the conference. On my very first page, from the Welcome and Opening Remarks of Conference Chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, SCP, FAAN, DCC, I had written the following: 

I remember this point vividly, as Dr. Fitzgerald had commented that years ago, when our numbers were much smaller, not too many people had an issue with nurse practitioners practicing to the full extent of our education and training. Now however, as there are over 180,000 nurse practitioners, the power of our numbers is threatening to many, even despite recent research demonstrating our value in patient outcomes and satisfaction. This point is incredibly evident in this recent Op Ed piece from The New York Times, Nurses are not Doctors, where the author cites a study from 1999 to support his opinion, which is clearly not the most up-to-date, best available evidence. Have you read it? I encourage you to do so when you are sitting down, because it did bring out a bit of my temper. Rest assured that some leaders in nursing did reply with some Letters to the Editor and you can read them here

And now back to some take-aways from NCNP…

*The states with the least restrictive NP regulations see twice as many patients as those in other states.
Carol L. Thompson, PhD, DNP, ACNP, FNP, FCCM, FAANP
Keynote Address: Awesome Practiced Daily

*Don’t use an ARB and ACE inhibitor concomitantly to treat hypertension.
Joyce L. Ross, MSN, CRNP, CLS, FNLA, FPCNA
JNC-Late: A Focus and Update on the Long-Awaited Hypertension Guidelines

*Not all infected patients are febrile and not all febrile patients are infected.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*If a patient has an inappropriate tachycardia related to his elevated temperature, consider pulmonary embolism as the cause.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*Sepsis doesn’t kill patients; multisystem organ failure resulting from sepsis does.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*If a patient has kidney injury, used unfractionated heparin for DVT prophylaxis.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*Our patients give us very important information, if we listen!
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*If a patient has loss of the hair that makes up the outer eyebrows, think hypothyroidism. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*The presence of pulsus paradoxus is a sign of cardiac tamponade, but can also be seen in severe asthma.
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*To assess judgment in patients with traumatic brain injury, ask “What would you do if there was a fire in your kitchen?”
Tracey Andersen, MSN, CNRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC
Neuro Assessment and Diagnostic Work-up for Advanced Practitioners

Thanks for reading this wrap-up! Want to see photos from the event? Here’s our album – enjoy! 



Nursing2014 Symposium

clock March 31, 2014 08:08 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I’m on my flight home after another successful LWW nursing conference! Nursing2014 Symposium was held from March 26 to March 29, and between the preconference workshops, sessions, exhibit hall, and city of Las Vegas, these days were overflowing with learning from national experts, networking with colleagues, and fun!

I was lucky enough to assist with the preconference workshop, Let’s Get Messy: Hands-On Anatomy, Resuscitation, and Emergency Skills Lab, presented by Scott DeBoer, RN, MSN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CFRN, EMP-P. During this one-of-a-kind course, we reviewed anatomy and practiced procedures such as intraosseous device placement, airway management techniques, and more. We even practiced skills on actual pig airways, hearts, and lungs. Here are some pictures!  

A recurring theme throughout the sessions I attended had to be changing clinical practice based on the evidence. In the opening session, Nurse’s Habits: “But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It!, Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN, reviewed many of the practices that we perform just because we’ve always done them. From the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension to methods used for verifying placement of feeding tubes, it is clear that we’ve got a long way to go to change practice based on the evidence. (FYI – unless contraindicated, position hypotensive patients flat with the legs elevated; get an x-ray to confirm feeding tube placement.) 

Here are some more tips & takeaways from this conference: 

*The guiding principles of patient and family-centered care are information sharing, participation, dignity and respect, and collaboration. 
Tiffany Christensen
Partnering with Patients – A Bed’s-Eye View of Patient and Family-Centered Care

*If you don’t know how to do something, don’t ask someone else who doesn’t know! 
JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS
Medication Safety: Going Far Beyond the Five Rights

*It costs between $45,000 and $55,000 to treat central line bloodstream infection (CLBSI). 
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Best Practices for PICCs and CVCs

*The only thing you can pre-chart is a plan. Anything else, document as you do it or after it’s done. 
Edie Brous, RN, MS, BSN, MPH, Esq.
Documentation and Liability: How What You Write Can Show Up in Court

*HgbA1C levels are not accurate in sickle cell carriers or anemic patients. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
ADVANCED TRACK: Sweet Success – Making Sense of the Dizzying Deluge of Diabetes Drugs

*Test for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Caucasian patients younger than 45 with COPD. 
Mary Knudtson, DNSc, NP, FAAN
Acute Exacerbation of COPD

*Make sure the ‘tank is full’ before using vasopressors. 
Michael Ackerman, DNS, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FNAP, FAANP
ADVANCED TRACK: Hemodynamic Stability

These are just the highlights of the many notes I took during the conference. I hope that those of you who attended had a great time learning and networking too! Don’t forget that you can access the slides from many of the presentations online at Lippincott's eConference Center. Also, be sure to complete your evaluations and obtain your CE credit!

I am now looking ahead and getting excited for the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners April 23-26, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. What conferences have you attended or do you plan to attend this year?



Tips & Timesavers for Conference Attendees

clock April 4, 2013 10:33 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Attending any conferences this spring? Here’s a list of tips and timesavers to help you make the most of your time! 

1. Make a schedule. Plan which sessions you’ll attend and create your itinerary! Use the most convenient form that works for you – paper and pencil list or electronic device. Some conferences even have a smartphone app to help you do this. Check the attendee program or ask at the registration desk for details.

2. Pack comfortable shoes. Conference centers can be large, especially if it’s a big event with a large number of attendees. Also, remember that the walk through airports, train stations, and other public transportation centers can be long as well.

3. Do your homework. If you would like to speak with a presenter or are interested in connecting with a particular exhibitor, prepare your questions ahead of time. Sometimes the lines can be long and there may be limited time between sessions. Make sure you make the most of your time and convey your message clearly and succinctly.

4. Bring a notebook. Make notes on your computer, mobile device, or use pen and paper. Things you are learning and hearing will be fresh and exciting at the time, but when you return to your “real world,” you might not remember everything like you thought you would.

5. Keep some snacks handy. Not all airlines provide snacks, or if they do, there may be a charge for them. Also, if you are attending back-to-back sessions without much of a break, having a snack or two on-hand can help ease your hunger and keep you alert.

6. Consider packing an extra bag. You may accumulate quite a bit of ‘extras’ during the conference. From handouts and journals to goodies from the exhibit hall and souvenirs, it might make packing for your return a little easier. Be aware of airline restrictions and fees however! You could even consider using a larger bag than you need so you’ll have extra room for your return trip.

Enjoy your conference! Let me know which you’ve attended or are planning to attend, and what exciting and innovative things you learn. Also, please share your own tips too!



Nursing2013 Symposium

clock March 25, 2013 05:45 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

As I write this, I’m on my return flight from Nursing2013 Symposium in Las Vegas, Nevada. With each conference I attend, a highlight for me is developing new relationships and strengthening older ones with nursing colleagues from around the country and world. As nurses, we have an incredible amount of knowledge and experiences to share and getting away from our workplaces and joining together to talk and learn is exhilarating! By the nature of my work, so many of my relationships are “virtual” ones – communication via email, text, and social media is more the norm for me than face-to-face conversations, so it thrills me to connect in person with nurses that I’ve only “met” online.

I have quite a bit to share from this conference, but let me start with quotes that inspired & educated me during this event!

“Many times, a patient’s history leads to a diagnosis; the physical examination supports that diagnosis.”
Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP
Physical Assessment Skills for Adult Patients

“The most accurate way to take a blood pressure is by using the bell of the stethoscope.”
Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP
Physical Assessment Skills for Adult Patients

“It doesn’t take a title to be a leader.”
Jeff Doucette, MS, RN, CEN, FACHE, NEA-BC
Leading From Where You Are: Creating a Culture That Inspires

“Staff nurses are front-line leaders and often hold the key to resolving turnover drivers.”
Jeff Doucette, MS, RN, CEN, FACHE, NEA-BC
Leading From Where You Are: Creating a Culture That Inspires

“The best leaders are personal leaders.”
Charles Denham, MD
A Lifesaver for Lifesavers: How to Survive the Rough Seas of Patient Safety and Value-Based Purchasing Demands

“Human factors that contribute to the complexities of patient handoffs include too few nurses, fatigue, rushed report, memory, nursing turnover, emotion, and information/sensory overload.”
JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS
Effective Handoff Communication: A Key to Patient Safety

“Every time lactate increases by 2, the risk of death [from sepsis] increases by 20%.”
Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN
Sepsis: Nurses Implementing the Latest Guidelines

“The mortality for sepsis equals that of an acute MI in 1960.”
Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN
Sepsis: Nurses Implementing the Latest Guidelines

“For every organ system that fails, mortality [from sepsis] increases by 22%.”
Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN
Sepsis: Nurses Implementing the Latest Guidelines

“Falls are an adverse drug reaction.”
Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP
Recognizing and Treating Adverse Drug Reactions

“Angioedema from ACE inhibitors is not dose dependent.”
Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP
Recognizing and Treating Adverse Drug Reactions

“Start with what you know best, maybe a case study, and start writing.”
Denise Drummond Hayes, MSN, RN, CRNP
Bylines and Deadlines: Writing for Professional Publication

“Our work is based on science and evidence, but we are best known for our caring side.”
Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC
Finding Your Nursing Voice

“The person with a strong nursing voice is an expert problem solver who is more proactive than reactive.”
Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC
Finding Your Nursing Voice

As many of the sessions were happening concurrently, I know there is so much that I missed and I look forward to listening to several of the presentations when they are available online. For those of you who attended this conference, please share what you learned and what inspired you too! 

Also, you can view some photos from the conference on our Facebook page!



Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care 2012

clock October 24, 2012 15:17 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

As I write this, I’m on my flight home from the Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care 2012 which was held at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada. Thank you to the conference chairpersons, Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, DAPWCA, FAAN and Richard Salcido, MD. It was an informative, well-organized, and fun conference!

I was particularly drawn to the sessions which addressed skin care and pressure ulcer management at the end of life. Even in the keynote address, Legally Defensible Wound Care, presented by Caroline E. Fife, MD, CWS and Kevin W. Yankowsky, JD, this was a theme. An interactive case presentation was the format and we, the audience, got to share our opinions/votes by holding up a red or green card to questions such as “Was this pressure ulcer a result of negligence?”, “Would you take the case?”, and “Should the hospital be sued?”, among many others. During the presentation, an interesting observation was shared. When a cause of death is identified as ‘heart failure’ or ‘renal failure,’ a response of sympathy often results; however, a cause of death of ‘skin failure’ often leads to more negative responses, such as “that never should have happened” or even a search for somewhere or someone on which to place blame. 

The lesson that I learned, both from this keynote address and from a session titled Skin & Wound Care at Life’s End: Clinical Considerations, presented by Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, DAPWCA, FAAN, is that the skin is an organ and at the end of life, it will fail just as the heart and kidneys and other organs do. Despite optimal care and evidence-based interventions for skin and wound care, skin failure and pressure ulcers often are unavoidable at the end of life. 

Here are some more highlights from the conference:

  • Book signing! Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, DAPWCA, FAAN and Elizabeth Ayello, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA, FAAN were on hand to sign their book Wound Care Essentials, Third Edition. 
  • Exhibit Hall! The exhibitors shared their products in dynamic ways, including wound care karaoke & dressing change races.
  • Quotes! Looking back on my notes, I just have to share these wise words that were shared.
    • “The keys to preventive legal care and effective communication are managing expectations beforehand and answering questions afterward.” Kevin W. Yankowsky, JD
    • “Edema is the real enemy.” Sandra Wainwright, MD (discussing chronic venous hypertension ulcers)
    • “Anytime cartilage is present, you have a stage IV pressure ulcer.” Diane K. Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN
    • “If there is stable eschar on a heel, leave it alone!” Diane K. Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN
    • “We all own pressure ulcers, not just nurses.” Elizabeth Ayello, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA, FAAN
    • “The Braden scale accounts for most risk factors for pressure ulcers, but we also need to think about perfusion, age, comorbidities, and if the patient has a history of pressure ulcers.” Dr. Janet Cuddigan

You can see some pictures from the conference on our Facebook page. Next year, this conference will be held in Orlando, FL on October 24-27, 2013. It would be great to see you there!



Teach People How To Treat You

clock October 8, 2012 06:25 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

In the opening address at Nursing Management Congress 2012, Sharon Cox presented ways that managers can “add value in a time of volatility.” While this was a conference geared toward nurse managers and other administrators and executives, her words and ideas are applicable to us all, both as nurses and as human beings.

One thing that she said (it’s on my list of favorite quotes from the conference) was “We teach people how to treat us.” While looking back at my notes, I found these words in all capitals and circled several times. This was a powerful statement!

Think about it. Do you have colleagues who aren’t true “team players?” Any bullying go on in the unit where you work? Are some nurses bullied more that others? Why?

You can ask yourself similar questions about any relationships, not just in the workplace. If we allow ourselves to be treated poorly, people will continue to do so. I agree with this statement by Sharon Cox because by allowing others to treat us with disrespect, it’s as if we are condoning that behavior.

So what is the solution? In my mind, the trick is to be “respectfully assertive,” that is, stand up for ourselves without being aggressive or becoming defensive. This is one of those things that is often “easier said than done,” but by being aware of how we receive and react to certain behaviors and making any necessary changes on our own end, perhaps we can make a difference.



Top 10 Quotes from Nursing Management Congress 2012

clock September 28, 2012 14:37 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Some wise words were spoken at Nursing Management Congress this year. Here’s my top list of quotes from the conference. Thank you to all of the experts who shared their experience and stories with us!

Without further ado…

1. “Our knowledge of what we do everyday is very limited; based on tradition, not science.”
Richard Hader, RN, PhD, FAAN, CHE, CNA, CPHQ, Conference Chairperson, Editor-In-Chief, Nursing Management Journal, Senior Vice President and Chief Nurse Executive, Meridian Health

2. “Intrapreneurs are ‘dreamers who do.’”
Kathy Russell-Babin, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, ACNS-B, Senior Manager, Institute for Evidence-Based Care, Meridian Health

3. “Prioritization is a fact of life in clinical practice.”
Sean Clarke, RN, PhD, FAAN, Director, McGill Nursing Collaborative for Education and Innovation in Patient and Family Centered Care, McGill University and the McGill Teaching Hospital Network

4. “We teach people how to treat us.”
Sharon Cox, BSN, MSN, Founder and Principal Consultant, Cox and Associates

5. “Shift from ‘busy’ to ‘productive.’”
Sharon Cox, BSN, MSN, Founder and Principal Consultant, Cox and Associates

6. “Don’t forget the patient in the shared decision making model.”
Richard Hader, RN, PhD, FAAN, CHE, CNA, CPHQ, Conference Chairperson, Editor-In-Chief, Nursing Management Journal, Senior Vice President and Chief Nurse Executive, Meridian Health

7. “As a patient, if a provider comes in with an unkempt appearance, do you want that person to touch you?”
Richard Hader, RN, PhD, FAAN, CHE, CNA, CPHQ, Conference Chairperson, Editor-In-Chief, Nursing Management Journal, Senior Vice President and Chief Nurse Executive, Meridian Health

8. “People can change when they are fighting for a cause bigger than themselves.”
John O’Leary, President, Rising Above

9. “When you know your ‘why’ you can endure any ‘how.’”
Victor Franco, Holocaust Survivor (shared by John O’Leary, President, Rising Above)

10. “One person always makes a difference.”
John O’Leary, President, Rising Above

Please keep in mind that I was not able to attend every session as the breakout sessions occurred concurrently. I'm sure I am missing many great quotes on this list! All of the sessions that I did attend were informative, but even more impressive to me, was how invigorating they were. From the enthusiasm in the audience and some of my conversations in the exhibit hall, I know I was not the only one feeling this way. If you are a nurse leader, consider attending Nursing Management Congress 2013 next year!



What a great idea!

clock September 18, 2012 05:43 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I just spent a wonderful long weekend in Nashville, Tennessee at Nursing Management Congress 2012. What a great city, great venue (Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center), and great event! I learned a lot, connected with lots of nurse managers and executives, and enjoyed my surroundings. I have lots to share with you over my next few blog posts, but I’m especially excited to share the following idea which was presented by one of the attendees and then shared by Sharon Cox, BSN, MSN during the opening session, titled “Nurse Managers: Adding Value in a Time of Volatility.”

During one of the preconference workshops, a discussion about staff recognition had begun, when one attendee (I wish I knew her name to give credit where credit is due) shared a means of recognizing staff members that has had positive results. Rather than recognizing a staff member with a pat on the back or a letter of recognition to be filed, this manager asks the staff member (and I’m paraphrasing here), “I’d like to let someone important to you know what a valuable asset you are to us. To whom could I send your letter of recognition?”  She then wrote a personal note to to the person selected. 

This manager said she’s written to parents, spouses, mentors, and children of her staff members and has gotten positive feedback from all involved. She even met one staff member’s parents at a wedding and was thanked in person for the note she had written about their daughter.  

What a great idea!



Recent Comments

Comment RSS

About your comments

We welcome comments, discussion, curiosity, and debate. Let us know about your nursing lives and personal experiences. We reserve the right to moderate comments that are intended to sell something or that are inappropriate or hostile.

Disclaimer

Views expressed on this blog are solely those of the authors or persons quoted. They do not necessarily reflect Lippincott's NursingCenter.com's views or those of Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Sign in