NursingCenter.com

NursingCenter’s In the Round

A dialog by nurses, for nurses
NursingCenter.com

The American Nurse Project

clock April 25, 2014 01:25 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

During a discussion with several nurses last night, we acknowledged the importance of nurses having a passion for the profession, and how this passion makes a difference in patient care. When I view the trailer for The American Nurse: Healing America, I feel the passion in the voices of those nurses featured. I can only imagine the impact that viewing this entire feature documentary will have. It premieres during National Nurses Week and I am really looking forward to seeing it! 

In 2012, Carolyn Jones, a photographer and filmmaker, traveled across the United States documenting the work of nurses. Her book, The American Nurse, was published that year and includes portraits, interviews, and biographies of nurses she encountered on her journey. An interview with Jones reveals her passion for this project, despite not being a nurse herself. She states, “Nursing is real. I'm fascinated by how a nurse can help all different people, even people that have committed terrible crimes, with the same compassion that they can treat a friend.” She learned a lot during her conversations with nurses and her journey is bringing our important work into the eyes of the public. For that, I am grateful. 

I will leave you with this powerful quote from the mission of The American Nurse Project: 

“At some point in our life each of us will encounter a nurse, whether it be as a patient or as a loved one. And that one encounter can mean the difference between suffering and peace; between chaos and order. Nurses matter.

I hope that many of you will get the opportunity to see this film. You can find a list of theaters here. I look forward to hearing what you think! 



NursingCenter’s “Specialty Sites”

clock March 19, 2014 04:06 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Are you familiar with NursingCenter’s specialty sites? In the past few years, NursingCenter has launched two specialty sites, the Evidence Based Practice Network and the Skin Care Network. Both sites feature targeted, in-depth content and each have their own unique features and products. Let’s take a quick glance to learn more about these sites.

The Skin Care Network

The Skin Care Network was launched in 2011 by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. The goal is to share all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media. 

Take a look at some of our features: 

News
Discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items.

Tools & Resources
Organized by clinical topic, pages feature all dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities and patient education tools.

Society Partners
Learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses.

Skin Care Insider eNewsletter
Sign up for our free monthly eNewsletter that offers you the latest on skin care!

Social Media
Look for The Skin Care Network on Facebook and Twitter.

The Evidence-Based Practice Network

Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network is an online resource powered by LWW and the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), which promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to healthcare professionals. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. 

Here are some network highlights: 

JBI Tools

JOURNAL CLUB*
Here, you gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty, as well as the opportunity to share information and ideas with other professionals.

SUMARI*
This premier review software package helps health professionals conduct systematic reviews of evidence of feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of health intervention.

TAP*
Analyze small qualitative datasets following a three-step process of entering data, categorizing data, and building themes. 

CAN-IMPLEMENT*
Tailor your clinical practice guidelines for local use with this JBI tool. 

JBI Library
Subscribe and gain access to JBI’s vast collection of evidence-based resources. 

JBI Continuing Education
Discover JBI’s continuing education resources, as well as their evidence-based practice series. 

‘Show Me The Evidence’ Blog
Stay up–to-date with Lippincott’s blog dedicated to evidence-based practice.

EBP Insider eNewsletter
Sign up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter!

Social Media
Follow The EBP Network on Facebook and Twitter



Free Nursing Resources

clock March 10, 2014 04:41 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Take advantage of our vast collection of free nursing resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com. We know how important your work as a nurse is, and we want to reward your efforts with free nursing activities. From nursing journals to continuing education activities to podcasts, we’ve got what you need, and it’s FREE! 

  • Featured Journal
    Every few weeks, NursingCenter.com presents a “Featured Journal” chosen from more than 50 journals available on our site. Every article in the latest issue is offered to you free of charge. 
  • Nurse’s Choice List
    Discover the top 10 recommended nursing articles selected by our nurse editor. These articles are available to read free online for a limited time.
  • CE Activities 
    All of our journals’ continuing education articles are free to read—you only pay when you wish to earn CE credit. 
  • Patient Education Materials
    Keep your patients informed with our free patient education materials. 
  • Future of Nursing 
    In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released the report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, with the goal to assess and transform the nursing profession. Access articles on this topic for free. 
  • Nursing Tips
    Improve your nursing practice with our free nursing tips, including handy mnemonics, definitions, practice pointers, and more. 
  • Nursing News by HealthDay
    Keep up with the latest headlines in nursing news for free.
  • eNewsletters
    As a member of Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com, you can subscribe to any of our free eNewsletters and get the latest articles and CE activities delivered right to your inbox.
  • Skin Care Network Featured Clinical Updates
    On our Skin Care Network, access our free featured clinical updates from our favorite journal content. 
  • Skin Care Network Image and Video Libraries
    View the latest images and videos in clinical dermatology for free. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Network Featured Articles
    Stay informed in evidence-based practice with our free featured articles. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Podcasts
    Our free podcasts include evidence-based practice information from the American Journal of Nursing and our nursing conferences. 



Well done, CVS!

clock February 6, 2014 08:14 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

My very first job was at a CVS store. I worked as a cashier there in high school and for 2 summers during college. As a cashier, I was responsible for restocking the cigarettes behind the counter…not a part of the job that I enjoyed, but it passed the time when we were slow. The area behind the counter was pretty narrow, and I would often have to step over and around cases of cigarettes while working. They sold quickly back then and my hands would smell of cigarettes after an evening of work.

I was impressed when I read the announcement yesterday that CVS stores would no longer be selling cigarettes. What an example this organization is setting, and I am hopeful that this will start a trend among other pharmacies and retailers. 

"Ending the sale of cigarettes and tobacco products at CVS/pharmacy is the right thing for us to do for our customers and our company to help people on their path to better health," Larry J. Merlo, president and CEO of CVS Caremark, said in a statement. "Put simply, the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose."

Along with this news, the company has announced the launch of a smoking cessation plan this spring. 

Well done, CVS! 

According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress, there are 12 cancers and 20 chronic diseases linked causally to smoking. It is encouraging that the prevalence of cigarette smoking has declined from 42% in 1962 to 18% in 2012  (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014), however, it is even more encouraging that smoking cessation programs are continuing to be developed. There is more work to be done to educate the public and help people to not start smoking and to quit if they already do smoke.

More Resources:

Reference:
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014, January). 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014. Retrieved from SurgeonGeneral.Gov: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/50-years-of-progress-by-section.html



Fighting the Obesity Epidemic

clock March 11, 2013 03:46 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

In 2010, more than one-third of adults in the United States were obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

It’s safe to call the issue of obesity an epidemic at this point, and it can lead to other complications like heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and certain types of cancer. The health problems caused by obesity are some of the leading causes of preventable death.

A new infographic from Nursing@Georgetown outlines some important statistics about this issue, aimed at increasing awareness and educating the public about the positive effects of a proper diet and exercise.

Things like eating whole grains, switching to low-fat milk, and increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables can help turn things around and lead to a healthier body. In addition, the USDA has developed a nutrition guide called MyPlate that outlines recommended food portions.

Exercise also helps, and all adults should set a long-term goal to accumulate at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days. Check out the infographic below for information, and ways we can all work to improve our health behaviors.

Obesity in the U.S.: Fighting the Epidemic with Proper Diet & Exercise

Via Nursing License Map and Nursing@Georgetown

This post is written by Erica Moss, who is the community manager for the online nursing programs at Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies.



Spotlight on Men’s Health

clock August 13, 2012 08:08 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

More than half of all premature deaths among men are preventable.

We’ll let that sink in for a moment. Pretty shocking, right? The topic of men’s health finds itself front and center during Men’s Health Month every June, but the conversation quickly fades in the months thereafter.

A new infographic from Nursing@Georgetown shines a spotlight on the current state of men’s health in the U.S., aimed at increasing awareness of preventable health problems and encouraging early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. A few more statistics:

  • 60% of men aged 50 or older were not screened for colon cancer in the past year.
  • 7 million American men haven’t seen a doctor in more than 10 years.
  • 67% of men wouldn’t go to the doctor when experiencing chest pain or shortness of breath — two early warning signs of a heart attack. 

But it doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom. By raising awareness, advancing health education and recognizing culturally influenced behaviors, each of us can help improve men’s health. Check out the infographic below for tips on when and how often men should be tested for certain health issues.

Men's Health Infographic

Via Nurse Practitioner Programs and Nursing License Map

This post is written by Erica Moss, who is the community manager for the online masters in nursing program at Georgetown University.



Spreading the word about sun safety

clock May 2, 2012 09:13 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

My eyes have really been opened over the past year. Since launching the Skin Care Network in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses’ Association and becoming a member of the editorial board of the Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association, I have learned A LOT about skin cancer, indoor tanning, and prevention. I’ve written about skin cancer before on this blog, not so much about the cancer itself, but my involvement (or lack of) when caring for my dad when he underwent Moh’s surgery (Is Nursing Really For me?) I digress a little, mainly to share that with a family  history of skin cancer, I should and will be more proactive in prevention methods for myself and my family. 

Recent publications demonstrating the increasing incidence of melanoma and its association with tanning bed use include Increasing Incidence of Melanoma Among Young Adults (Mayo Clinic Proceedings), Use of Tanning Beds and Incidence of Skin Cancer (Journal of Clinical Oncology), and Melanoma surveillance in the United States: Overview of Methods (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology). Many states have enacted or are considering teen tanning bed restrictions (here’s  a nice list) and a Congressional Report revealed “the false and misleading health information provided to teens by the indoor tanning industry.”

I know those are a lot of links to sort through above, however, the number of reports & articles (and there are more) demonstrate what a big issue this is. What is critical here is that there are ways to prevent or minimize skin cancer occurrence, resources to educate our patients and the public, and important information to know to recognize skin cancer so it can be treated early. The following organizations and events are a good place to start! 

Organizations/Programs

National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention 

Children’s Melanoma Prevention Foundation 

SunAWARE 

Outrun the Sun 

Events

Melanoma Monday ~ the first Monday in May; the purpose is to raise melanoma awareness and encourage early detection.

Don’t Fry Day ~ the Friday before Memorial Day; the purpose is to increase sun safety awareness and remind everyone to protect their skin while spending time outdoors.



Resources for Alcohol Awareness

clock April 13, 2012 04:55 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I was taken aback when I read that “one in five patients admitted to a hospital suffers from alcohol use disorder” in Managing alcohol withdrawal in hospitalized patients in the April issue of Nursing2012 (here’s the pdf for the best view). With numbers like this, it really is critical that we are aware and able to assess all patients for signs and symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. I’d like to bring this article to your attention because there are some great resources included to help assess patients and also care for those experiencing alcohol withdrawal. There is a table on timing of symptoms – when they might occur in relation to the last drink – and also a copy of the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alchohol Scale, Revised (CIWA-Ar), which is the gold standard for assessing for withdrawal. The CIWA-Ar is not copyrighted – so go ahead and print it out, share it, and use it (in accordance with your facility policy, of course.)

April is Alcohol Awareness Month. While those of us in the hospital setting may come in contact with patients at risk for or experiencing alcohol withdrawal, we all know that a critical component of alcohol awareness is prevention. This year’s theme is “Healthy Choices, Healthy Communities: Prevent Underage Drinking."  Won’t you read more about this and help spread the word?



Support your fellow nurse

clock January 26, 2012 04:53 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

We see, read, and hear so much about horizontal violence and nurses not being supportive of each other, and also about other healthcare professionals being unsupportive of nurses. Another such case is occurring, but what is striking to me, is that while this one nurse is going through this tough time, nurses on the web are rallying together to support her and encouraging others to do the same.

The case is of Amanda Trujillo, a registered nurse in Arizona. According to a letter she wrote and the posts of many nurse bloggers, Amanda has been fired from her job, her nursing license is in question, and she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation after educating a patient about his illness and options. The patient decided to forgo surgical intervention and explore hospice care. The details of her case can be read on a number of nursing blogs, including vdutton’s posterous (with the transcript of details recorded by her attorney), Those Emergency Blues, and Emergiblog. The Nerdy Nurse also has several posts and an extensive list of resources about the case and ways to show support.

I can think of several instances where patients I’ve cared for had questions that either were not answered by the healthcare team or were answered, but the patient did not fully understand his condition or options. On many  occasions in my nursing career, I provided patient education that helped a family make an  informed decision. I’ve called together family meetings with the healthcare team and requested ethics committee consultations. Advocating and educating patients, within the scope of nursing practice and institution policies, of course, is our responsibility. 

I will be following the case to see what evolves and the response of nursing organizations. Thank you to the nurses who have been sharing Amanda’s story.



A tour of the Skin Care Network

clock July 13, 2011 03:09 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I am very excited to introduce our new microsite, the Skin Care Network! This site was developed by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. Our goal is to share with you all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media.

Here are some highlights of the Skin Care Network that I don't want you to miss:

  • In News, you'll discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items that your patients may ask about.
  • In Tools & Resources, we've organized content by clinical topic, created a page with all our dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities, and compiled patient education tools for you to share with your patients.
  • In Multimedia, find podcasts of presentations from Lippincott's nursing conferences. More resources will be coming soon to this section!
  • Also learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses on our Society Partners page and the Journal of the Dermatology Nurses Association (JDNA), Plastic Surgical Nursing (PSN), and The Nurse Practitioner by visiting the Journals page.

Take some time to explore the site ~ I hope you find the Skin Care Network to be a valuable resource to meet your professionals needs!



Recent Comments

Comment RSS

About your comments

We welcome comments, discussion, curiosity, and debate. Let us know about your nursing lives and personal experiences. We reserve the right to moderate comments that are intended to sell something or that are inappropriate or hostile.

Disclaimer

Views expressed on this blog are solely those of the authors or persons quoted. They do not necessarily reflect Lippincott's NursingCenter.com's views or those of Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Sign in