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CEConnection for Allied Health Professionals

clock April 18, 2014 04:34 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know Lippincott has its own CEConnection tailor-made for allied health professionals? This one-stop resource hosts more than 110 continuing education courses design to help allied health workers improve patient outcomes with activities based on evidence-based practice guidelines. 

This platform offers peer-reviewed multimedia and interactive content from Lippincott journals. The platform is also customizable for institutions and individuals. You can track courses using your own My Planner tab, enabling you to add activities to do now or save for later. You are also able to browse courses by categories, including clinical, topic, specialty, and profession. Once you add an education activity, it’s displayed in your planner, as well as your Shopping Cart. 

Allied Health’s CEConnection currently covers courses for 12 professions, including:

Addiction Counselor
Cardiovascular Technologist
Case Manager
Clinical Laboratory Scientist
Dietetic Professional
Healthcare Quality Professional
Pathology Technologist
Pharmacist
Physical Therapist
Respiratory Therapist
Radiologic Technologist
Speech-Language Pathologist

Each month, new courses and additional allied health specialties are added. 

CEConnection for allied health professionals is available for institutional and individual purchase. Healthcare institutions and specialists interested in this platform can get more information by calling 855-695-5070 or sending an email to Sales@LippincottSolutions.com.



Nursing eBooks

clock April 7, 2014 06:58 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know that Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com houses more than 25 different nursing eBooks? From books on evidence-based practice to infusion coding to LGBTQ cultures, you are sure to find an interesting topic worth reading about. Book purchases include an eReader format for download to a device such as an iPad, Nook, or Kindle. 

Let’s take a look at some of the eBooks our site has to offer:

AJN's Evidence-Based Practice Series: Step by Step
Better your evidence-based practice through a series of articles from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. 

Ten Years of Teaching and Learning Moments
This eBook includes brief vignettes that chronicle the first-person experiences of teachers, students, and patients as they learn about the science and the art of medicine. It derives its content from the first 10 years of the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the journal, Academic Medicine

The Editor's Handbook: An Online Resource and CE Course
Designed for journal editors, this eBook explores  impact factors, journal indexing, budgeting, journal development, editorial board composition, and the peer review process. 

LGBTQ Cultures: What Health Care Professionals Need to Know About Sexual and Gender Diversity 
Intended to serve as an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) health issues, this eBook helps healthcare professionals create safe environments for patients, as well as their LGBTQ coworkers. 

Synthesis Science in Healthcare Book Series (Books 1-18)
The Joanna Briggs Institute offers this eBook series for individual purchases of $19.99 or books 1-18 for $220. Books 1-18 will help you understand the JBI model of evidence-based healthcare, appraise qualitative and quantitative research, appraise evidence from intervention and diagnostic accuracy studies, and learn ways to minimize risks from adverse events. 

Nurse Practitioner 2012 Liability Update: A Three-part Approach 
Celebrate the CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO)’s 20th anniversary (in 2012) of the nurse practitioner professional liability insurance program with this free eBook. 

Understanding Nurse Liability, 2006 – 2010: A Three-part Approach 
The CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO) aim to educate nurses about risk with this free eBook, which focuses on nurse closed claims over a five-year period. 

Lessons from a Visionary Leader 
Richard Hader, the long-standing and highly-respected late Editor-in-Chief of the Nursing Management journal, offers advice to leaders in healthcare organizations on how to be courageous, creative, take risks, and say “no.”



The Rise of the Nurse Practitioner

clock April 3, 2014 16:36 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

This infographic was shared with us by Maryville University’s Nursing Program

 



Nursing2014 Symposium

clock March 31, 2014 08:08 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I’m on my flight home after another successful LWW nursing conference! Nursing2014 Symposium was held from March 26 to March 29, and between the preconference workshops, sessions, exhibit hall, and city of Las Vegas, these days were overflowing with learning from national experts, networking with colleagues, and fun!

I was lucky enough to assist with the preconference workshop, Let’s Get Messy: Hands-On Anatomy, Resuscitation, and Emergency Skills Lab, presented by Scott DeBoer, RN, MSN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CFRN, EMP-P. During this one-of-a-kind course, we reviewed anatomy and practiced procedures such as intraosseous device placement, airway management techniques, and more. We even practiced skills on actual pig airways, hearts, and lungs. Here are some pictures!  

A recurring theme throughout the sessions I attended had to be changing clinical practice based on the evidence. In the opening session, Nurse’s Habits: “But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It!, Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN, reviewed many of the practices that we perform just because we’ve always done them. From the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension to methods used for verifying placement of feeding tubes, it is clear that we’ve got a long way to go to change practice based on the evidence. (FYI – unless contraindicated, position hypotensive patients flat with the legs elevated; get an x-ray to confirm feeding tube placement.) 

Here are some more tips & takeaways from this conference: 

*The guiding principles of patient and family-centered care are information sharing, participation, dignity and respect, and collaboration. 
Tiffany Christensen
Partnering with Patients – A Bed’s-Eye View of Patient and Family-Centered Care

*If you don’t know how to do something, don’t ask someone else who doesn’t know! 
JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS
Medication Safety: Going Far Beyond the Five Rights

*It costs between $45,000 and $55,000 to treat central line bloodstream infection (CLBSI). 
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Best Practices for PICCs and CVCs

*The only thing you can pre-chart is a plan. Anything else, document as you do it or after it’s done. 
Edie Brous, RN, MS, BSN, MPH, Esq.
Documentation and Liability: How What You Write Can Show Up in Court

*HgbA1C levels are not accurate in sickle cell carriers or anemic patients. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
ADVANCED TRACK: Sweet Success – Making Sense of the Dizzying Deluge of Diabetes Drugs

*Test for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Caucasian patients younger than 45 with COPD. 
Mary Knudtson, DNSc, NP, FAAN
Acute Exacerbation of COPD

*Make sure the ‘tank is full’ before using vasopressors. 
Michael Ackerman, DNS, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FNAP, FAANP
ADVANCED TRACK: Hemodynamic Stability

These are just the highlights of the many notes I took during the conference. I hope that those of you who attended had a great time learning and networking too! Don’t forget that you can access the slides from many of the presentations online at Lippincott's eConference Center. Also, be sure to complete your evaluations and obtain your CE credit!

I am now looking ahead and getting excited for the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners April 23-26, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. What conferences have you attended or do you plan to attend this year?



The number of male nurses is on the rise

clock March 24, 2014 05:43 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of men entering the nursing profession has tripled since 1970. The study, which tracks data through 2011, shows an increase from 2.7 to 9.6 percent, meaning about 330,000 men are working as nurses to date. 

To celebrate and encourage more men entering the profession, here is some nursing content related to male nurses on NursingCenter.com. 

Continuing Education Activities
 Men in Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, January 2013
Expires: 1/31/2015 

 Original Research: 'How Should I Touch You?': A Qualitative Study of Attitudes on Intimate Touch in Nursing Care, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, March 2011
Expires: 3/31/2015 

Journal Articles
 Team concepts: The nurse in the man: Lifting up nursing or lifting himself?, Nursing Management, June 2013 

 ISSUES IN NURSING: Men work here too: How men can thrive in maternal-newborn nursing, Nursing2014, March 2013 

 Online Exclusive: Are male nurses emotionally intelligent?, Nursing Management, April 2012

 Recruitment & Retention Report: EXTRA Young adults' perception of an ideal career Does gender matter?, Nursing Management, April 2011 

 Gender and Professional Values: A Closer Look, Nursing Management, January 2011 

 Letters: Men and Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, April 2013 



NursingCenter’s “Specialty Sites”

clock March 19, 2014 04:06 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Are you familiar with NursingCenter’s specialty sites? In the past few years, NursingCenter has launched two specialty sites, the Evidence Based Practice Network and the Skin Care Network. Both sites feature targeted, in-depth content and each have their own unique features and products. Let’s take a quick glance to learn more about these sites.

The Skin Care Network

The Skin Care Network was launched in 2011 by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. The goal is to share all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media. 

Take a look at some of our features: 

News
Discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items.

Tools & Resources
Organized by clinical topic, pages feature all dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities and patient education tools.

Society Partners
Learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses.

Skin Care Insider eNewsletter
Sign up for our free monthly eNewsletter that offers you the latest on skin care!

Social Media
Look for The Skin Care Network on Facebook and Twitter.

The Evidence-Based Practice Network

Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network is an online resource powered by LWW and the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), which promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to healthcare professionals. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. 

Here are some network highlights: 

JBI Tools

JOURNAL CLUB*
Here, you gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty, as well as the opportunity to share information and ideas with other professionals.

SUMARI*
This premier review software package helps health professionals conduct systematic reviews of evidence of feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of health intervention.

TAP*
Analyze small qualitative datasets following a three-step process of entering data, categorizing data, and building themes. 

CAN-IMPLEMENT*
Tailor your clinical practice guidelines for local use with this JBI tool. 

JBI Library
Subscribe and gain access to JBI’s vast collection of evidence-based resources. 

JBI Continuing Education
Discover JBI’s continuing education resources, as well as their evidence-based practice series. 

‘Show Me The Evidence’ Blog
Stay up–to-date with Lippincott’s blog dedicated to evidence-based practice.

EBP Insider eNewsletter
Sign up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter!

Social Media
Follow The EBP Network on Facebook and Twitter



Shampoo-rinse-repeat

clock March 14, 2014 04:55 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I was a new graduate working in the Medical ICU, a few weeks off orientation, when I cared for Jenny*. She was 18 years old, the youngest patient on our unit. It was not the norm for such a young person to be a patient on our unit. In fact, it was odd. 

She was a college student who had gone to Student Health Services with an upper respiratory infection. She was given antibiotics and sent on her way. Why did she develop acute respiratory failure? I’m not sure anyone ever knew that answer. It was just one of those things…

Jenny spent a long time in our unit – months – battling the gamut of ICU complications we were used to seeing, just not in someone so young. ARDS, renal failure, GI bleed…just to name a few. She had her share of time spent on vasopressors, paralytics, and sedatives; endured arterial lines, SWAN placement, and dialysis; received multiple blood transfusions and courses of antibiotics; and was on and off isolation precautions for various resistant organisms. A tracheostomy and g-tube were placed when she became more stable and ready to wean from the ventilator. 

I was usually the nurse that wanted the sickest patients. I didn’t mind getting an unstable new admission or going on a road trip with a patient to a diagnostic study or procedure. One of my best days, however, was a slow one in the unit. Jenny was fairly stable, and she was my only patient that day. Her mom was there and was always eager to help with Jenny’s care. 

As the shift went on, and it looked like things were going to stay quiet on the unit (not that we EVER said that our loud), I asked Jenny if she’d like me to wash her hair. Her eyes got real big and she looked at me questioningly. She nodded.

Like many tasks, it took longer to gather supplies than to actually perform it. I finally found real shampoo (and conditioner!), used a water pitcher for wetting her hair and rinsing, set up a trash bag to catch the excess water, and piles and piles of towels. 

Jenny’s mom and I worked together washing her hair. We joked about opening our own salon and Jenny was smiling looking up at us. We made a mess and all got pretty wet, but it was worth it. We had gotten those weeks of knots and dried blood and betadine from her hair, combed it neatly, and it smelled so nice! 

When we finished, Jenny asked for a paper and pen. She wrote “Think you could shave my legs?”

Her mom and I looked at each other. “Sure.”

*Not her real name.



Free Nursing Resources

clock March 10, 2014 04:41 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Take advantage of our vast collection of free nursing resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com. We know how important your work as a nurse is, and we want to reward your efforts with free nursing activities. From nursing journals to continuing education activities to podcasts, we’ve got what you need, and it’s FREE! 

  • Featured Journal
    Every few weeks, NursingCenter.com presents a “Featured Journal” chosen from more than 50 journals available on our site. Every article in the latest issue is offered to you free of charge. 
  • Nurse’s Choice List
    Discover the top 10 recommended nursing articles selected by our nurse editor. These articles are available to read free online for a limited time.
  • CE Activities 
    All of our journals’ continuing education articles are free to read—you only pay when you wish to earn CE credit. 
  • Patient Education Materials
    Keep your patients informed with our free patient education materials. 
  • Future of Nursing 
    In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released the report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, with the goal to assess and transform the nursing profession. Access articles on this topic for free. 
  • Nursing Tips
    Improve your nursing practice with our free nursing tips, including handy mnemonics, definitions, practice pointers, and more. 
  • Nursing News by HealthDay
    Keep up with the latest headlines in nursing news for free.
  • eNewsletters
    As a member of Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com, you can subscribe to any of our free eNewsletters and get the latest articles and CE activities delivered right to your inbox.
  • Skin Care Network Featured Clinical Updates
    On our Skin Care Network, access our free featured clinical updates from our favorite journal content. 
  • Skin Care Network Image and Video Libraries
    View the latest images and videos in clinical dermatology for free. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Network Featured Articles
    Stay informed in evidence-based practice with our free featured articles. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Podcasts
    Our free podcasts include evidence-based practice information from the American Journal of Nursing and our nursing conferences. 



Take a look inside our collection of stroke resources

clock March 6, 2014 03:43 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Caring for patients with stroke can be challenging; when a stroke is occurring, it is imperative to distinguish the symptoms from other diagnoses. Determining the type and location of stroke is yet another difficulty. Further challenges are met with treatment and rehabilitation. 

To help you manage these complex issues, we’ve created a Focus On: Stroke collection, which is comprised of journal content, as well as the following special features:

Each item in this collection is only $1.99, or you can purchase the entire collection together with the Powerpoint slides, podcasts, and the Take5 for only $19.99 (doesn’t include CE).  

To further your learning and help you meet your continuing education requirements, we've bundled the three CE articles below at a reduced rate. Earn 7 contact hours for only $19.99 – that's a savings of more than $50 if purchased individually!

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: Follow the guidelines
Nursing2013
3 contact hours

Ischemic Stroke: The first 24 hours
The Nurse Practitioner
2 contact hours

Recognizing and Preventing Acute Stroke in Women
Nursing2012
2 contact hours

I hope you’ll take some time to explore this collection! Have a question or comment? Please feel free to connect with me here on the blog by leaving a comment or you can email me at clinicaleditor@nursingcenter.com.  



3 days left!

clock February 25, 2014 05:03 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Two of our most popular CE collections will be expiring on Friday, February 28, 2014. If you haven’t already taken advantage of these specially-priced collections, you should check them out ASAP!

Anticoagulant Medications
7.3 contact hours - $19.99
Expiration Date:  2/28/2014
When patients are on anticoagulant medications, significant safety concerns exist, especially the risk of excessive anticoagulation and hemorrhage. It is important to understand these risks yourself, as a healthcare provider, and to educate the patients in your care on how to minimize their risk and be alert for complications. 

NP: Pharmocology Hours
10.4 contact hours/10.4 advanced pharmacology hours - $44.95
Expiration Date:  2/28/2014
Depending on the state where you work as a nurse practitioner or your area of practice, it may be necessary for you to maintain a certain number of advanced pharmacology hours for your license or certification. 

Need more CE? See our complete list of topical CE collections and our special collections on ‘never events.’ Please be aware that the CE tests for each article must be taken before they expire.



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