Source:

Nursing2015

February 2011, Volume 41 Number 2 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Authors

  • LAURI ROSE BSN, RN, HNC
  • LISA SHEFLER FAUX LPN
  • JOHN PERRODIN NURSING STUDENT

Abstract

I enjoyed "Why Florence Nightingale Still Matters" (November 2010),* which makes the case for why her teaching is still relevant. I'd like to mention another fundamental of hers: Good health starts in a healthy community. Nightingale's work in India was seminal public health nursing. Despite all our modern technology and methods, the basics haven't changed. For promoting health, I haven't found anything better than fresh air, exercise, hygiene, and good food choices.-LAURI ROSE, BSN, RN, HNCBridgeville, Calif.I'd like to tell fellow nursing students about an "illness" that can affect them: "iatrogenic cephalitis."Pathophysiology: Cerebral edema secondary to information overload.Signs and symptoms: Nausea, headache, diarrhea, anorexia, weight loss, xerostomia, epigastric painNursing interventions: * Study consistently; repetition is the key. * When you're not absorbing what you're reading, switch tasks. * Read over your notes daily; don't cram the night before exams. * Make time for dinner

Nightingale's teaching: Still relevant

 

I enjoyed "Why Florence Nightingale Still Matters" (November 2010),* which makes the case for why her teaching is still relevant. I'd like to mention another fundamental of hers: Good health starts in a healthy community. Nightingale's work in India was seminal public health nursing. Despite all our modern technology and methods, the basics haven't changed. For promoting health, I haven't found anything better than fresh air, exercise, hygiene, and good food choices.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

-LAURI ROSE, BSN, RN, HNC

 

Bridgeville, Calif.

Tuned into students

 

I'd like to tell fellow nursing students about an "illness" that can affect them: "iatrogenic cephalitis."

 

Pathophysiology: Cerebral edema secondary to information overload.

 

Signs and symptoms: Nausea, headache, diarrhea, anorexia, weight loss, xerostomia, epigastric pain

 

Nursing interventions:

 

* Study consistently; repetition is the key.

 

* When you're not absorbing what you're reading, switch tasks.

 

* Read over your notes daily; don't cram the night before exams.

 

* Make time for dinner with your family.

 

* Get enough sleep, eat balanced meals, and exercise daily.

 

* Challenge yourself; you can handle more than you think.

 

* Forget about your dust bunnies; you'll get to them evenually.

 

* Enjoy life and be thankful for each day of good health.

 

 

Outcome criteria: Your patient thanks you!!

 

-LISA SHEFLER FAUX, LPN

 

Tunkhannock, Pa.

 

Nursing2011 seems to have been written just for me: a nursing student. Every issue includes content specifically relevant to my classes.

 

For example, "Managing Hypernatremia" (Clinical Queries, September 2010)* fits hand-in-glove with what we're studying in medical-surgical nursing. As I transition into the nursing profession, I consider your journal to be an outstanding resource.

 

-JOHN PERRODIN, NURSING STUDENT

 

Colorado Springs, Colo.

 

Editor's note: This month, Nursing2011 is launching a new department called Student Voices, focused on the unique concerns of nursing students. Check it out on page 9.

 

* Individual subscribers can also access this article free online at http://www.nursing2011.com. [Context Link]