Source:

Nursing2015

April 2009, Volume 39 Number 4 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • GINNY BOGART RN

Abstract

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BOGART, GINNY RN

Issue: Volume 39(4), April 2009, p 8 Publication ...

 

[black small square] I'm responding to "Napping on the Job?" (Letters, December 2008)* because I'm a night-shift nurse. The letter-writer said that nurses who work the night shift should sleep at home like those working on the day shift.

 

A nurse who's fatigued can make serious errors in judgment. At my facility, night-shift nurses take power naps on our required breaks. We awaken refreshed, recharged, and energized. These naps improve the way we feel and respond to our patients' needs.

 

GINNY BOGART, RN

 

Osseo, Wis.

 

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