All Nurses Are Leaders

all-nurses-are-leaders-(2).PNG
 
As we get deeper into 2017, let’s remember that we are all leaders, no matter where we work, the patient populations that we care for, or our role in nursing. As nurses, we lead every day – some of us at the bedside or in the clinic, some of us in the classroom, some of us in patients’ homes, some of us in the boardroom – there are too many places to list! For 2017, I’d like to focus on you – as a leader in nursing – no matter where you are. Hopefully, you already realize that you are a leader every day, but if you do need a little convincing, through the course of this year we’ll make it clear to you.
 
So how are you a leader? Ask yourself the following questions…
 
1. Are you an expert? Think of the things that your colleagues come to you for repeatedly. Maybe it’s a question about a certain diagnosis or patient population. Perhaps you’re the go-to person for placing I.V.s when there is a patient who is a difficult stick.

2. Are you an educator? Do you teach students? Do you ever precept new or new-to-your-unit nurses? Do you teach colleagues from other disciplines about the unit where you work? What about patient education? (We all do this one!)

3. Are you an advocate? Do you speak up for your patients and their families? How about for yourself? Your colleagues? The nursing profession?

4. Are you a role model? Do you take on the charge nurse role? Are you a team player? Are you a nurse that others strive to be like? Do you model healthy behaviors for patients and the public?

5. Are you a voice for our profession? Are you educated about the global issues affecting nursing and health care? Are you a committee member at your institution? Are you a member of a professional nursing organization? Are you involved in local, state, or national boards?

6. Are you a nurse? We know we are trusted by the public – in fact, we’ve been voted the most trusted of all professions for the past 15 years in a row! How often do family members and friends come to you with a health-related question or advice? The title ‘nurse’ signifies leadership to those around us.
 
If you answered yes to any of the above, then you are a leader!
 
Stay tuned as we dig deeper into each of these areas throughout the year. We’ll share resources, advice, and personal stories, and some helpful strategies as you continue to develop the nurse leader within.
 
Have a great year!
 
Posted: 2/10/2017 4:33:27 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


World Cancer Day and How Nurses Can Help

world cancer dayFebruary 4th is World Cancer Day, and the theme for the day between 2016 and 2018 is “We can. I can.” Here, at Lippincott Nursingcenter, we know there are a number of ways nurses can help bring awareness to this day, along with ways nurses can better care for patients affected by cancer. 

1. Spread the word: Follow these hashtags on your social media accounts to join the discussion around World Cancer Day. 

  • #WorldCancerDay
  • #WeCanICan

2. Stay informed: Stay up-to-date on the latest research and evidence around cancer.  
Subscribe to the peer-reviewed journals, Cancer Nursing and Oncology Times.
.Cancer NursingOncology Times
  • Earn continuing education credits with over 160 CE activities related to oncology.
  • Access evidence-based cancer content instantly at the point of care with Lippincott Advisor. The individual version of the app used by leading hospitals includes over 1,000 evidence-based content entries on cancer symptoms, drugs, treatments, and more. Download it now for only $29.95.
3. Take action: Get certified in oncology by visiting our Guide to Certification page and scrolling down to the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.  
Posted: 1/31/2017 8:34:22 AM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Diseases & Conditions


Nurse On the Move: Lori Mayer [Podcast]

Nurse On the Move: Lori Mayer [Podcast]For this special edition of Nurse On the Move, we are featuring Lori Mayer, DNP, MSN, RN, MSCN, an MS-certified nurse and editorial board member of LiveWiseMS.org. LiveWiseMS launched in December of 2016, and is a site dedicated to supporting patients with MS, their caregivers, and health care providers. 

Our own senior editor, Kim Fryling-Resare, joined LiveWiseMS to offer her technical skills as their web editor, but also as the voice and face of the site. She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2003 and has dedicated part of her life to supporting patients like herself. She recommended that I speak with Mayer, who holds a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree and is the director of Medical Research Services for Central Texas Neurology Consultants/Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Clinic of Central Texas, as well as a chair for the IOMSN Research Committee, and member of the editorial board of the International Journal of MS Care. 

Listen to our conversation to learn more about what an MS nurse is, how to create a nursing care plan for an MS patient, and to discover what LiveWiseMS.org is all about. 

Listen for the whole interview…
Nurse On the Move Lori Mayer Podcast
 
Be sure to check out LiveWiseMS.org and recommend it to your colleagues or patients. 
 
Posted: 1/25/2017 9:10:59 AM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership Nurse On the Move


For our nurse colleagues with the super I.V. skills

palpating-vein.pngYou know who I’m talking about, right? Don’t we all know a nurse who seems to hit a vein every. single. time? I think every unit has the go-to nurse when there is a “tough stick” in need of I.V. access. Actually, a few nurses come to mind when I think back to my days in the unit. Back then, we just ‘knew’ who the experts were. Maybe it was (or is) you!

Now, infusion nurses are getting the recognition they deserve. Every year on January 25th, we celebrate I.V. Nurse Day to recognize our colleagues who provide specialty care to those patients requiring the expertise of an infusion nurse. Infusion nurses have a special knowledge and skillset, and from acute care settings to home care, and among most specialties, having an infusion nurse as part of your team is important.

Happy I.V. Nurse Day!
Posted: 1/24/2017 9:12:54 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Education & Career


My Nursing Care Plan: One Year Later

My-Nursing-Care-Plan.PNGIt’s hard to believe that it’s been a year since we began developing My Nursing Care Plan! It has been such a fun project for me, as well as a learning experience. Thinking about and organizing the content was challenging, even though, as a nurse myself, I know what my requirements are, what I need to do to stay up-to-date in nursing, and what I should be doing to balance work and life! The difficulty was putting it down in words and figuring out how to try and juggle it all. Creating the companion video and infographics was something new for me too – but I do love learning new things, especially when it comes to technology – so it was quite a treat to be involved in those projects. Lastly, having a conversation with Michelle Berreth RN, CRNI®, CPP, a nurse educator for the Infusion Nurses Society (INS), was quite eye-opening and inspiring, but more on that later…

So, what’s happened since my Mid-Year Update? Not too much…here’s a quick recap and a look ahead to 2017:
  • 2017-to-do-list.PNGSince I renewed my licenses in 2016, I’m not due for renewal until 2018. I’m proud to say that I’ve already logged in 12 contact hours toward my 30-hour requirement for license renewal for my RN license. I do need, however, to step up my contact hours related to women’s health to meet my 45-hour requirement for my NP license! My goal is to complete 35 contact hours related to women’s health by 12/31/17.
  • I’ve decided that before returning to school, I’d like to get back to the bedside. What I really need to think about is “what does that mean?” Do I want to work as a staff nurse or nurse practitioner? In critical care or women’s health? My heart is leaning toward acute care, but I’m also considering inpatient hospice.
  • Regardless of what clinical path I decide to take, I’d like to get certified. Something new I discovered last year were ‘-K’ or ‘knowledge’ certifications, specifically for nurses or NPs who don’t provide direct care, but do influence patient care. I will definitely be looking a little closer at this opportunity.
  • Work-life balance continues to be a struggle, just as I’m sure it is for many of you. My cough is now under control, and the focus now turns to eating and sleeping right, and exercising more. I’m due for my annual gynecologic exam and mammogram, so I’ll be scheduling those ASAP.  
Now, back to my conversation with Michelle from INS. During our discussion, we came up with some insights to consider when using My Nursing Care Plan that I think are important to share.
  • Consider asking others – colleagues, family, friends – to contribute to your own care plan.
  • Waiting for the right time to get things done isn’t realistic. When is the right time? If you wait for it, it may never come.
  • Assess if multitasking really is in your best interest. Remember that it doesn’t work for everyone and it’s okay to do one thing at a time.
  • Be present. Whether at work or in your personal life, focus on the task at hand – whether it’s a true task or a personal or professional interaction.
  • Evaluate your care plan monthly, preferably about one week before month’s end. See what’s left to do and take a glance at plans for the next month. You can even set a reminder to do this on your phone or email.
What’s your update from the past year? Any goals for 2017 you’d care to share?

More Reading & Resources

 


 
Posted: 1/18/2017 7:16:37 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


The Nursing Workforce is Changing: Macro Trends in Nursing [Infographic]

“The workforce is changing…We know that just by going into work every day.” For our fourth macro trend in nursing, our Chief Nurse, Anne Dabrow Woods DNP RN CRNP ANP-BC AGACNP-BC FAAN, surveys the ways in which the nursing workforce is evolving and adapting. From more men entering the profession, to more nurses with a wider range of specialties, to nurses staying in practice longer, the nursing population is not what is used to be. 

Review our handy infographic below to discover the six ways the nursing workforce is changing.
 
  the nursing workforce is changing infographic

Don’t forget to bookmark our blog and to keep an eye out for the final two trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel.

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/january-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/January-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-infographic.png.aspx?width=300&height=750></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/january-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in"> The Nursing Workforce is Changing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>
 
Posted: 1/13/2017 9:36:37 AM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Let’s celebrate! The Textbook of Basic Nursing reaches its 50th anniversary.

 
textbook-blog-wordcloud-(2).pngWith its 11th edition, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Textbook of Basic Nursing, a step-by-step 
comprehensive text that walks LPN/LVN nursing students through basic skills, procedures, concepts, and clinical applications. Based on the NCLEX-PN framework, this engaging text introduced critical thinking to nursing students for the past 50 years thanks to its two authors, Caroline Rosdahl RN, BSN, MA and Mary Kowalski RN, BA, BSN, MSN . Both Rosdahl and Kowalski have been major contributors to the nursing industry since the beginning of their careers. They’ve witnessed first-hand how nursing education has grown and evolved, and they’ve been able to translate these changes into meaningful educational tools for their readers.
 
During Rosdahl’s time in graduate school, she was approached by someone looking to set up a nursing school and began to write behavioral objectives for them. Rosdahl encountered some push-back from her colleagues, who considered nursing to be “too emotional and too psychological” to have objectives, but she wrote them anyway. After people saw her objectives, she got requests for her syllabi, which led Lippincott to approach her in 1967 to join the textbook’s 2nd edition, which now includes behavioral objectives in every chapter. “I felt I had something unique to offer that hadn’t been done in nursing before,” says Rosdahl. Kowalski joined the textbook as a consultant for its 6th edition, and then became co-author on its 8th edition, which published in 2002. She graduated from nursing school in 1975 and started as a nurse’s aide. When she returned to nursing school, she really enjoyed writing and reading, which translated to her work on the textbook. “I got to learn all of the updated materials, and I’ve enjoyed making sure the students have the information they need. I was an instructor for 25 years, and I really enjoy working with the nursing students,” Kowalski says.

“It’s amazing how many things have changed,” since she started writing for the textbook states Rosdahl. “From government regulations to procedures to equipment,” it’s been a challenge to ensure the textbook stays current she says, but “it is rewarding to see it in print and to see people use it in practice. To think I’ve been around so long is quite amazing.” Over the past 50 years, both Rosdahl and Kowalski have seen the role of the nurse and the technology they use evolve and become more complicated to manage. Rosdahl explains a new challenge today that nurses face is that “patients are sicker and there’s so much more equipment, there’s so many medications and treatments, that it’s not like nursing used to be.” If a patient is in a hospital today, “they have to be really critical, otherwise, they get sent home, and the nurse is expected to be able to do all of this, while also being expect to specialize. If you want to work in an ICU, you need extra training. Back in the day, I could float and work everywhere in a hospital, now a nurse can hardly go from one department to another. It’s so much more complicated.” Kowalski remembers when she started “we didn’t have I.V. pumps that could count the drips for you automatically and have an alarm go off. You had to actually count your drips from the intravenous line so you’d know you had it at the right speed. Otherwise, you’d overflow your patient or give them too much fluid or too little.” When she started in 1975, emergency rooms were just starting to use CPR and triage. “If you go to an ER now, these [nurses] are actually trained to work in an emergency room as a specialty. Now, there’s a whole training shift for acute care nursing.” 

textbook of basic nursing 11th edition coverWith all of the new training initiatives that have occurred, along with new technology being utilized to educate nurses, Kowalski urges that “machines go wrong and students don’t remember to check the machines. You have to calibrate your machines.” For instance, to put the wrong size tubing in the machine could result in the death of a patient. “We depend on the machines and not on the actual human being, but [patients] don’t push the call button because they want their machine adjusted. They push the call button because they want a person.” Rosdahl explains that when she started, nurses learned by clinical experience. They would be in the hospital, taking care of patients and learning on the job, “which was admittedly a little haphazard,” but they were getting experience with patients. “Now, so much of the education is in the laboratory with simulation. There are actually programs without any clinical experience, and that to me, is really scary because the kids get out without any idea on how to relate to a patient.” Today, students enter the workforce and experience a “culture shock,” where they are not used to working weekends, long shift hours, and interacting with patients.
 
A good change that has occurred, however, is that “there are lots of resources on the internet, which is great and helpful to the students. But sometimes, they are not accurate and you have to really be careful” of your sources, explains Rosdahl. We need to “remind the kids that the internet is not the bible,” she stresses. Kowalski agrees and is concerned about “how much time students are using to look things up” online. “When we were doing the book and editors told us ‘let’s take this part out and put it online,’ there are still a lot of students that actually need it in the book, I think. But, everything is going online, so [the editors and publishers] need to define where students will get their information, whether it’s an online chapter or in the actual book.” Regardless of where they do decide to find their information, however, the source of the information is still the most important thing. Students can value authoritative, credible resources, like the Textbook of Basic Nursing. 

For their 50th anniversary edition, Rosdahl and Kowalski have put special attention and time into the textbook. Kowalski really enjoys chapter 13 on “Older Adults and Aging,” which goes over the concept of the aging process and the concept of the paradigm shift in aging. “I had to research the definition of aging, and I discovered there is no real definition,” she says. “Aging used to be 65, but now 85 is really considered ‘older.’” With nurses now working past 65 and a new generation of nurses coming in, chapter 13 goes over the special considerations of an aging nursing workforce. Rosdahl’s favorite section of the textbook is on psychiatry, which is her specialty. She also is happy that two to three editions ago, the textbook began to include colored illustrations, “which really make a difference,” along with the teaching ancillaries. And to top it all off, Rosdahl is excited that there is now an Indonesian translation of the textbook. 

For new nurses starting out, the authors have some advice. Rosdahl advises that “all education is aimed at teaching how to learn. You can’t teach [students] all of the material, so nurses need to know that they don’t know everything, and they have to use references, other nurses, and find out what they don’t know about an individual patient. They need to know what they don’t know.” Kowalski stresses that the first year of their career is the most critical. “They need to know they will be scared to death. They don’t know what to do and they will say they didn’t learn anything in nursing school…but in the next three months things will become calmer for them in the real world. Then by the sixth month after they graduated, they will think ‘oh, I can do this,” but then will become cocky. They start taking shortcuts, which is when the most errors occur – it’s between the sixth month post-graduation to the ninth month.” The last three months of that first year, she says, are where you really understand what they’re doing as a nurse. 

As Rosdahl and Kowalski turn their attention to the next 50 years to come, they see a bright future for nursing. “We are going to have more men in nursing,” predicts Rosdahl, and “with that, comes a difference in salaries, which will increase.” She also believes that nursing will continue to grow more complicated over time, and “we’re going to need more nurses, we are going to need more specialized nurses, and we are going to need more nurses in the community. People are sent home early and they will need to be cared for.” Kowalski predicts there will be more machines and computers in nursing than there are today. The information will be more automated, she explains, and that it is “both good and bad. The information is numbers, which doesn’t tell you if your patient is crashing.” Nurses will continue to need to learn how to interpret these numbers and the machines to benefit their patients. 

To learn more from these authors, visit the Textbook of Basic Nursing

 
Posted: 1/6/2017 9:20:02 AM by Cara Deming | with 3 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Celebrate Nursing 2017

2017-NURSING-RECOGNITION-DATES.pngHappy New Year! Here’s the list of nursing recognition days, weeks, and months for 2017*.
Know of others? Please leave a comment or email clinicaleditor@nursingcenter.com.  
Thank you!
 
*Dates and links will be updated as they become available.
 

January

February

March

April

May

June

September

October

November

Let us know how you will celebrate or what plans you have to recognize your colleagues. Leave a comment or email us at clinicaleditor@nursingcenter.com.

Have a great year!
 
Posted: 1/4/2017 3:13:05 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Cardiac Output and Cardiac Index – What's the Difference?

Mastering hemodynamics can be tricky, but the first step is understanding the terminology. Let’s take a look at cardiac output and cardiac index – how to calculate them and why they’re important.

Cardiac Output (CO)

Cardiac output is the volume of blood the heart pumps per minute. Cardiac output is calculated by multiplying the stroke volume by the heart rate. Stroke volume is determined by preload, contractility, and afterload. The normal range for cardiac output is about 4 to 8 L/min, but it can vary depending on the body’s metabolic needs. Cardiac output is important because it predicts oxygen delivery to cells.
 
Here’s an example:
If a patient's stroke volume is 75 mL with each contraction and his heart rate is 60 beats/minute, his cardiac output is 4,500 mL/minute (or 4.5 L/minute).
 
Cardiac-Output.png

Cardiac Index (CI)

The cardiac index is an assessment of the cardiac output value based on the patient’s size. To find the cardiac index, divide the cardiac output by the person’s body surface area (BSA). The normal range for CI is 2.5 to 4 L/min/m2.

Here’s an example of how to calculate the cardiac index:
If a patient’s cardiac output is 4.5 L/minute and his BSA is 1.25 m2, his CI would be 3.6 L/min/m2. If another patient has a cardiac output of 4.5 L/minute, but he has a BSA of 2.5 m2, his CI would be 1.8 L/min/m2.  
 
 Cardiac-Index.png
 
Both cardiac output and cardiac index are important to let us know if a patient’s heart is pumping enough blood and delivering enough oxygen to cells. We also use CO and CI values to manage certain drug therapy, such as inotropics and vasopressors.
   
References
Gowda, C. (2008). Don't be puzzled by cardiovascular concepts. Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, 27-30.
Smeltzer, S. B. (2010). Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing, Twelfth Edition. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Warise, L. (2015). Understanding Cardiogenic Shock: A Nursing Approach to Improve Outcomes. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing, 67-77.

 
Posted: 12/13/2016 9:40:25 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Diseases & Conditions


​Nursing Conferences and Events in 2017

nursing conferences and events 2017It’s hard to believe that 2016 is coming to a close. We’ve had some amazing experiences at nursing conferences and events this year. 

Our senior publisher, Bob Maroldo, and I attended the NSNA Annual Convention in the spring in Orlando, where I met many excited and eager nursing students about to start their careers. I also had the chance to go to Nursing2016 Symposium and National Conference for Nurse Practitioners (NCNP) in Orlando with our clinical editor, Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP. You can see a highlights video of all the fun we had on our Lippincott YouTube Channel.

 
ncnp conference 2016Lisa also attended the NCNP’s fall conference in Chicago with our senior editor, Kim Fryling-Resare, as well as Nursing Management Congress (NMC) 2016 in Las Vegas. 

Our team had a blast meeting and greeting nurses from all different practice areas and specialties -- we can’t wait for the upcoming nursing events in 2017! We compiled a variety of nursing conferences and events happening next year and here are a few to look out for.

Nursing Events 2017
• National Conference for Nurse Practitioners: The Conference for Primary and Acute Care Clinicians, April 19-22nd, Nashville, TN. 
• Nursing Management Congress 2017, October 2-6th, Las Vegas, NV.
National Conference for Nurse Practitioners: The Conference for Primary and Acute Care Clinicians, October 9-12th, Las Vegas, NV.

To see all the nursing conferences in 2017, visit our Nursing Events Calendar.

Which conferences are you planning to attend? 

 
Posted: 12/8/2016 8:02:11 AM by Cara Deming | with 3 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


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