Mobile Healthcare Applications Part 3: Nursing Education at Your Fingertips

healthcare-apps-part-3.pngRounding out this blog series on mobile health applications (apps) or mHealth apps, I wanted to touch on apps specifically designed to provide educational tools and quick references for the nursing profession. According to a survey conducted by Wolters Kluwer Health, 65 percent of nurses said they currently use a mobile device for professional purposes at the bedside.1  The study also found that 95 percent of health care organizations allow nurses to consult websites and other online resources for clinical information at work.1  A major advantage of mobile apps is that they provide a variety of references in one central location, that is easily attainable, from almost anywhere there is a reliable internet connection. Nurses employed in every clinical setting stand to benefit from resources at their fingertips, particularly those in home and public health settings, where access to evidence-based information may be limited.

As discussed in Part 1 of this blog series, there are thousands of mHealth apps available to clinicians. The most common are drug manuals, tools to help evaluate lab and diagnostic studies, and differential diagnosis guides2. Utilization of mobile devices in professional nursing practice may improve efficiency and assist clinicians to:
  • Complete professional development;
  • Stay up-to-date with the latest research and literature;
  • Provide patient and peer education;
  • Translate medical terms for patients and family members;
  • Compute drug dosages;
  • Calculate physiologic assessments, such as Body Mass Index (BMI), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Glascow Coma Scale score, Apgar score, Stroke Scale and many more;
  • Organize shift work; and
  • Communicate with other health care professionals.
With an ever increasing number of mHealth apps on the market, how can nurses decipher which are useful and contain the most relevant and accurate information? In order to utilize these resources effectively, nurses should be competent in several key areas, including basic computer knowledge and use, information literacy, (IL) and information management3. Information Literacy (IL) is defined as the ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and effectively use that information. Therefore, nurses must be able to assess mHealth apps for accuracy, credibility, bias, timeliness, and breadth of information.3  A study, conducted by Arith-Kindree and Vandenbark (2014), asked nursing students to assess a variety of mobile apps for usefulness. The study found that some apps, while from reputable sources, provided recommendations that were incomplete.3  Based on the findings from this study, nurses should critically evaluate each app to ensure it is:
  • Credible – verify the author’s credentials, publisher’s reputation, and peer-review status;
  • Relevant – assess the intended audience, purpose, and publication date;
  • Current – check that the content is consistently updated on a regular basis;
  • Utilitarian – confirm the app is useful and functions as it was designed; and
  • Comprehensive – establish that the information is complete and derived from a trusted source.
Health care apps can serve as useful tools for clinicians at the bedside, however, there are logistical and cultural obstacles that stand in the way of implementation and utilization. This opens up many opportunities for nurses in the field of informatics to develop policies, organizational infrastructure, and competencies for integrating mHealth solutions within health care organizations and communities.4  Several challenges, however, must be overcome which include:
  • Establishing hospital administrator support;
  • Overcoming staff resistance to change;
  • Training to different learning styles and comfort levels with technology;
  • Securing patient confidentiality;
  • Cost of infrastructure and maintaining consistent internet access;
  • Preventing vital machine failure or malfunction due to interference from handheld devices; and
  • Ensuring that mobile devices are not a distraction in the workplace.
Digital tools can potentially make us more efficient, effective, and informed practitioners. We are fortunate to live in an age of innovation where tools are available at our fingertips, any time, and anywhere. Unfortunately, not all mHealth apps are accurate and some cannot be trusted. We, as health care providers, need to develop a critical eye when evaluating the use of new technologies and verify that they are consistent with evidence based practice prior to full integration into the health care delivery system. In addition, more research is needed in the area of mHealth to assess the true impact it could have on workflow, quality, and patient outcomes.

References:
  1. Wolters Kluwer Health Survey Finds Nurses and Healthcare Institutions Accepting Professional Use of Online Reference and Mobile Technology. (2014). Retrieved on July 11, 2016 from http://wolterskluwer.com/company/newsroom/news/health/2014/09/wolters-kluwer-health-survey-finds-nurses-and-healthcare-institutions-accepting-professional-use-of-online-reference--mobile-technology.html
  2. Baca K, Rico M, & Stoner M. (2015) Embracing Technology to Strengthen Care and Enhance Human Connection. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing, 34(3), 179-80.
  3. Airth-Kindree  N & Vandenbark T. (2014) Mobile Applications in Nursing Education and Practice. Nurse Educator, 39(4). 166-169.
  4. Austin, R. & Hull, S. (2014) The Power of Mobile Health Technologies and Prescribing Apps. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 32(11). 513-515. 
Myrna B. Schnur, RN, MSN 

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Posted: 7/19/2016 5:29:04 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Technology


Mobile Healthcare Applications Part 2: To Regulate or Not?

Mobile-Apps-twitter-292994_1920.jpgIn Part 1 of this series, I provided a general overview of mobile medical applications (apps) that are available on the market in the areas of general health, wellness, disease management, and hospital clinical workflow. There are many potential benefits of mobile medical apps, such as facilitating communication between patient and provider, enhancing efficiency, and advancing the overall quality of patient care. There have been recent reports in the news, however, pointing to the dangers of patients being misdiagnosed via telemedicine websites and mobile apps. Serious patient safety questions arise when mobile medical apps are designed to act as a medical device or provide patients with a medical diagnosis. Should these apps be regulated by the government? Part 2 of this blog series focuses on the current regulation recommendations* surrounding the use of mobile apps as it applies to direct patient care.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the government organization responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety of drugs, biological products, medical devices, food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.1 In 2015, the FDA released a document that outlines the use of health care applications and states that apps that act as either a medical device or an accessory to a medical device will need to obtain FDA approval. The intended use of a mobile app determines whether it meets the definition of a “device.”  When the intended use of a mobile app is for the “diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or the cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body, the mobile app is considered a device.” 2 Intended use is communicated to the consumer through product labeling, advertising, or verbal and/or written statements made by manufacturers. All products that fall under the definition of device are subject to regulations set forth by the FDA before they can be marketed and sold to the general public.

FDA regulation will focus on mobile apps that turn a mobile platform into a regulated medical device, which could pose a risk to a patient’s safety if it did not function properly. Examples include medical apps that:
  • Connect to and control medical device(s) in order to actively monitor or analyze medical device data. (i.e., an app that controls the delivery of insulin on an insulin pump);
  • Turn the mobile platform into a medical device by using attachments, display screens, or sensors, or by including functions similar to those of currently regulated medical devices. (i.e., an attachment of electrocardiograph (ECG) electrodes to a mobile platform to measure, store and display ECG signals);
  • Perform patient-specific analysis and provide patient-specific diagnosis, or treatment recommendations. (i.e., apps that use patient-specific parameters to calculate dosage or create a dosage plan for radiation therapy).
The following medical apps pose low risk to patient safety, and therefore, the FDA will exercise discretionary judgment with regard to regulation. Examples include apps that:
  • Help patients self-manage their disease or condition without suggesting specific treatments (i.e., apps that coach patients with cardiovascular disease to maintain a healthy weight, eat nutritiously, and exercise);
  • Provide patients with simple tools to organize and track their health information, without recommending a change to previously prescribed treatment or therapy (i.e., apps that log blood pressure, drug intake times, diet, daily routine, or emotional state);
  • Provide easy access to information related to patients’ health conditions or treatments (i.e., apps that use a patient’s diagnosis to provide a clinician with best practice treatment guidelines for common illnesses or conditions);
  • Help patients document, show, or communicate potential medical conditions to their providers (i.e., apps that serve as videoconferencing portals to facilitate communications between patients, health care providers, and caregivers);
  • Automate simple calculations routinely used in clinical practice (i.e. medical calculators for Body Mass Index (BMI), Glascow Coma Scale Score, or APGAR score);
  • Enable patients or providers to interact with Electronic Health Records (EHR) systems to view or download data to facilitate general patient health management and medical record-keeping;
  • Transfer, store, convert format, and display medical device data, without controlling or changing the functions of any connected medical device.
Mobile apps that are not considered devices under the FDA definition and are not required to undergo regulatory requirements include apps that:
  • Provide electronic copies of medical textbooks or references not intended to diagnose, treat, or prevent disease by helping a clinician assess a specific patient;
  • Act as educational tools for medical training and may have more functionality than an electronic copy of text (i.e., videos, interactive diagrams), but are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease by helping a clinician assess a specific patient;
  • Provide general patient education and patient access to commonly used reference information;
  • Automate general office operations and administrative functions (i.e., coding, billing, accounting, scheduling, payment processing);
  • Act as generic aids (i.e., using the mobile platform to record audio, or send HIPAA compliant messages between health care providers in a hospital).
As more and more apps are developed in the field of health care, clinicians will play a pivotal role in how these apps are implemented in the routine care of patients. We need to have a basic understanding of app functionality, which ones are purely informational and which ones act as medical devices. More importantly, it is essential that we fully comprehend the impact these apps will have on the safety of our patients, as we are ultimately responsible for protecting them from harm.

In Part 3 of this blog series, I will provide an overview of the medical mobile educational tools available to nurses and how clinicians should evaluate which are the most reliable and relevant sources of information.

*Note: This article is a summary of the FDA guidelines and is not meant to be all-inclusive of the recommendations made by the FDA.
References
  1. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration. About FDA. Retrieved on June 27, 2016 from http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/WhatWeDo/default.htm
  2. Mobile Medical Applications: Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff (2015). Retrieved on June 23, 2016 from 
    http://www.fda.gov/downloads/medicaldevices/deviceregulationandguidance/guidancedocuments/ucm263366.pdf

Myrna B. Schnur, RN, MSN
 

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Posted: 7/10/2016 5:45:50 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Technology


Global Growth in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

It’s time for the second key macro trend driving the nursing profession in 2016 – “Global Growth in Nursing.” There are over 21.6 million nurses in the world and this number continues to rise, with most nurses residing in Europe and the Western Pacific. As the profession continues to grow globally, a number of challenges are presented both for nurses around the world and for nurses at home.

Use these Global Growth in Nursing infographics to understand how this macro trend affects you and your international partners. 

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                                          2.jpg

Bookmark our blog and be sure to watch out for the next four trends! Our Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC gave a presentation on the upcoming six key trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel.

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/1-(1).jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

Add this second infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/2.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

 

Posted: 7/6/2016 10:11:19 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Mobile Healthcare Applications Part 1: Your Health at Your Fingertips

mobile-phone-630413_640.jpgIf you own a Smart mobile phone, chances are you have downloaded a mobile application (app) or have used one at some point. According to a 2015 Pew Research Study, two-thirds of Americans own a Smart phone and more than half have used their phone to get health information.Mobile apps are software applications designed to run on platforms, such as smartphones, tablet computers and other handheld devices. Apps are downloaded onto your mobile device and are designed to provide consumers with quick access to information and tools with or without internet connectivity. As of June 2015, more than 100 billion mobile apps have been downloaded from app stores and the number of mobile app buyers in the United States is projected to reach 85 million in 2019.Apps developed specifically for health care are on the rise. There are over 150,000 mobile health, or mHealth, apps on the market focusing on various areas of wellness, including fitness, general health and drug information, disease management, telemedicine, and clinical workflow, to name a few. These are available for free or for a small fee and are typically intuitive and easy to use, even for those that are not technology savvy.

Fitness apps are perhaps the most widely used mHealth apps available today. Many of these apps have companion external devices known as wearables that help consumers track steps, weight, pulse, and calories. As a runner, I have used several training apps in preparation for long distance races. These assist in mapping routes, tracking training sessions, and calculating distance and speed. Some provide feedback on performance, while others send motivational reminders to users to get out and exercise. These digital coaches can facilitate healthy lifestyle changes and can be very cost effective to the average consumer, but only when integrated into a regular routine.

General health care apps provide a range of capabilities, such as allowing patients to organize documents, appointments, and medications into a personal file that can be easily accessed at provider appointments and by family members. Others allow consumers to have direct access to all of their electronic health records (EHR) integrated into one place that automatically update with new information, such as medical history, medications, allergies, prior surgeries and procedures, vital signs, changes in weight, and glucose readings via a patient portal. These apps facilitate the sharing of medical records with providers in real-time, which may promote patient safety, disease prevention, continuity of care, and patient self-management.

Drug information apps provide clinicians with medication references, such as drug indications, dosages, contraindications, safety information, and prescription interactions. Apps aimed at improving medication compliance provide patients with reminders to take their pills, how many to take, and when to refill a prescription. Disease management apps help clinicians monitor patients’ health status and streamline communication. For example, there are several apps on the market targeting diabetes therapy. Some simply help patients monitor blood glucose levels, while others provide sophisticated data analytics to the patient’s health care provider and team, along with a patient self-management plan. Telemedicine apps support communication between patients and providers and is one of the fastest growing areas of app development. These apps enable patients to connect with clinicians via video or text consultation in real time. Some healthcare providers are able to refer to specialists, order lab tests and prescribe medications through the app. Others allow providers to make a diagnosis and determine if an emergency room visit is necessary.

Finally, clinical workflow improvement apps streamline communications and data management for nurses and other providers within the clinical setting. These are the most advanced apps on the market, often linking multiple health information systems and improving efficiencies in the workplace. Incorporating mHealth apps into the in-patient care setting, however, involves a high level of commitment, coordination, and resources. Questions hospital administrators should consider when developing a strategy involving mHealth include4:
  1. Do mHealth technologies enhance workflow, reimbursement, and quality of patient care?
  2. Which mHealth apps are approved for recommendation to patients?
  3. When can an mHealth app be recommended to the patient and how would this information be communicated to the health care team?
  4. Who will provide guidance to the patient on the use of the mHealth app, and who is responsible for monitoring compliance and outcomes?
  5. What is the evaluation process for new mHealth apps? How will effectiveness be tracked?
  6. What new skills are needed by clinicians, information technology professionals, and hospital executives to ensure successful implementation of new digital tools?
Integrating mHealth has the potential to improve disease management, communication, and overall patient care. Complete adoption of mHealth, however, will depend largely on:
  1. Payers’ recognition of the value apps provide in health care management
  2. Establishment of standards for security and privacy guidelines that protect patient’s personal health information
  3. Evaluation and regulation of health care apps
  4. Full integration into health information systems4
Technology has and will continue to rapidly transform every aspect of our daily lives. Managing our health is no exception. As mHealth apps become more sophisticated and increasingly ubiquitous in our modern society, patients and consumers will demand higher quality and functionality. We, as health care providers, need to be armed with the skills to adopt and manage digital tools as they will inevitably become an integral part of how we deliver patient care.
 
References
  1. U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015. The Pew Research Center. Retrieved on June 15, 2016 from http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/us-smartphone-use-in-2015/
  2. Mobile App Usage – Statistics & Facts. Retrieved on June 20, 2016 from  www.statista.com. http://www.statista.com/topics/1002/mobile-app-usage/
  3. AJN Reports (2015). The World of Apps in Healthcare: Opportunities and Challenges for Nurses. American Journal of Nursing. 2016; 115 (11): 18-19.
  4. Austin R, Hull S. (2014). The Power of Mobile Health Technologies and Prescribing Apps. Computers, Informatics, Nursing.

Myrna B. Schnur, RN, MSN
 

Related Reading

Posted: 7/3/2016 7:53:25 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Technology


Mid-Year Update on My Nursing Care Plan

I hope that some of you have been using My Nursing Care Plan to help you achieve your professional goals and make self-care a high priority. Here’s an update on how I’ve been doing.

Meeting My Professional Requirements

Me-with-nursing-licenses.JPG

Well, even as a clinical editor and being very involved with sharing nursing continuing education activities and attending Lippincott Nursing Conferences, I’ve stayed true to my tendency to procrastinate! With an April 30th license renewal deadline, I completed my CE requirements just in time on April 25th. Fortunately, I did get my renewal done in time and avoided fees, however, I don’t recommend cutting it so close!

I have better intentions to keep up with my CE requirements over the next renewal cycle, though, and have already used My Planner to plan upcoming CE activities. Also, I’ll be attending both National Conference for Nurse Practitioners and Nursing Management Congress this fall. I feel like I’m off to a good start!

Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing

At this point in my career, conference attendance and keeping up with my reading of the latest research in nursing and health care is my main avenue for lifelong learning. In the past, my specialty certifications included CCRN (Acute/Critical Care Nursing) and WHNP-BC (Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner). I know that when I return to clinical practice, I will become certified in whatever specialty my career takes me next.
licenses.jpg
With regard to membership in a professional nursing organization, I’ve taken my own advice and rejoined the American Nurses Association, as well as the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association. There has never been a more important time to show your dedication to our profession and I encourage you all to get involved. If you are involved with publishing in nursing, I encourage you to join the International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE). I’ve been a member for years and it’s a great network of nurse authors, editors, and publishers – plus, it’s free to join!

Also, returning to school is definitely in the cards for me in the future. While I know the time will never be perfect, I’m just waiting for it to be a little better! I’ll keep you posted!

Maintaining Work-Life Balance

This part of the care plan has been a little trickier for me, and I wonder if you feel the same? As nurses, we are so used to taking care of others, that self-care is often less of a priority. I am happy to report that since the beginning of 2016, I’ve had a physical, including my mammogram and some other screening tests. I’ve also been working with my primary care provider and a specialist to diagnose and manage a chronic cough and shortness of breath (likely post-viral or adult-onset asthma).

I’m also getting out there and walking and doing my best to eat healthy, which is not always easy with a teenage son who has high-caloric needs to keep up with his sports. My next goal is to add some weight training to help maintain and improve bone density, which we know is critical for women as we get older.
And as for “me time” and managing stress, scheduling time for things I enjoy (reading and gardening, especially) and keeping them on the calendar definitely has helped. I admit that sometimes those times get pushed aside for other responsibilities, but as long as I keep trying and do my best, it’s better than my previous attempts.

How about you? What have you been up to? What’s been the most challenging part of the care plan for you? And, if you have any advice for me, I’d appreciate your support! 
 
Posted: 6/24/2016 10:15:04 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and Lippincott NursingCenter – what a pair!


JBI-logo.jpgIf you haven’t noticed already, Lippincott NursingCenter hosts a wide variety of content from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). JBI is a leading international research and development organization based within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. It promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to health care professionals to support clinical decision-making. As a leading provider of nursing resources based on the best evidence available, it only makes sense that NursingCenter would partner with JBI to provide the most up-to-date and authoritative nursing content. 

Most recently, Wolters Kluwer became the publisher of the JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and 
Implementation Reports (JBISRIR)
, an online journal that publishes systematic 
jbi-cover.jpegreview protocols and systematic reviews of health care research on a monthly basis. I’m actually the digital editor for this journal, and I am proud to say the editorial team behind this content is incredibly dedicated to providing reports that are based on JBI methodology and present the findings of projects that seek to implement the best available evidence into practice. You can find JBISRIR on NursingCenter. For all of the past issues and information for authors, please visit the journal website

There’s also a new JBI CE course hosted on NursingCenter, the Experiences of Heart Failure Patients Following Their Participation in Self-Management Patient Education. Learn how to recognize the components of a self-management education program for patients with heart failure and earn one contact hour. In fact, there’s over 50 JBI CE courses hosted on NursingCenter, including JBI Best Practice, JBI Long Courses, and JBI Evidenced-Based Practice Series

If that isn’t enough, NursingCenter also hosts the JBI tools on our Evidenced-Based Practice Network. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. The JBI tools include JOURNAL CLUB*, where you can gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty; SUMARI* a premier review software package helping health professionals conduct systematic reviews, TAP*; which allows you to analyze small qualitative datasets; and CAN-IMPLEMENT*, which tailors your clinical practice guidelines for local use.

NursingCenter is your one-stop shop for all things JBI. Be sure to check back regularly for new JBI content. 
Posted: 6/13/2016 10:49:54 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationEvidence-Based Practice


Learning from Nursing’s Past: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

Wolters Kluwer Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC surveyed the six key trends that are driving the nursing profession around the globe in 2016. The first macro trend in nursing this year is “Learning from Nursing’s Past.” From Florence Nightingale’s time to present day, nurses have shaped their professional skills around what works and what doesn’t. With a high emphasis on evidenced-based practice, learning from the past couldn’t be more applicable today. 

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Use this Learning from Nursing’s Past infographic to promote this trend in the profession and be on the lookout for the next five trends! 

To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi "><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/37d222c3-9129-4194-9966-d8f8dda0d1b0/learn-from-nursing-s-past-inforgraphic.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi"> Learn from Nursing’s Past </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>


 
Posted: 5/26/2016 9:22:56 AM by Cara Gavin | with 3 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Nursing2016 Symposium and NCNP: Conference Highlights

Earlier this month, nurses and nurse practitioners spent some sunny days in Orlando at the Coronado Springs Resort of Walt Disney World. We learned, networked, and enjoyed good food and fun! I must give props to the conference chairpersons, planning committee members, and meeting planners for such well-done back-to-back conferences. And I was lucky enough to attend both!

The keynote sessions were extraordinary. At Nursing2016 Symposium, Charles Kunkle, RN, MSN, CEN, BC-NA had the audience involved and laughing, while really making us think during his presentation, No Time to Care: Instilling Compassion Back Into Your Care in 60 Seconds or Less. One key reminder for me was that talking to a person as a human being, not a diagnosis, can make all the difference. Mr. Kunkle quickly did an ER admission scenario two ways – first referring to the patient as “the abdominal pain” through the admission process, then again referring to the patient by name. His lively and dynamic presentation style really added to the impact of his message. Also, Mr. Kunkle reminded us that “only 15% of the message that we deliver comes from spoken word.” So, remember, it’s not what you say, but how you say it. Pay attention to your nonverbal and paraverbal (tone, volume, and cadence) communication.

At the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners, the thrill of being in the presence of Loretta Ford, RN, PNP, EdD, FAAN, FAANP was indescribable. Using a Q & A format, conference chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC had a candid conversation with Dr. Ford about her work founding the nurse practitioner profession and her thoughts on the future of our profession. I especially enjoyed her insights for the future, including how “language matters.” She emphasized that the use of the word ‘medical’ is synonymous with ‘physician’ and that we should instead focus on using the word ‘health’ as much as we can. For example, she stated “Let’s reorient from saying ‘primary medical care’ to ‘primary health care.’”

Here’s a look at some other takeaways from the week:
  • “One in ten Americans take SSRIs.”
    Sophia Chu Rodgers, FNP, ACNP, FAANP, FCCM
    ABG Interpretation, Fluid, and Electrolytes
  • “Regarding pulse oximetry…remember to treat the patient, not the number.&rdquo
    AnneMarie Palatnik, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, AVP
    Skill Assessment: Pulmonary
  • “CCF (chest compression fraction) is the total amount of time compressions are delivered relative to the total amount of time of cardiac arrest. The goal is 60%, however, 80% is optimal and achievable when an advanced airway is present.”
    Denise Drummond Hayes, MSN, RN, CRNP
    The Case of the Vanishing Vasopressin: BLS & ACLS Guidelines Update
  • “Joint swelling is the hallmark sign of rheumatoid arthritis that is required for diagnosis.”
    Richard S. Pope, MPAS, PA-C
    RA in 2016: It’s Not What It Used to Be! Or Is It?
  • “You can use any ventilator setting for any patient as long as you understand how it works.”
    Eric Magaña, M.D.
    Nuts and Bolts of Mechanical Ventilation
  • “Mothers taking SSRIs in pregnancy put infants at risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension.”
    Dr. Lana Melendres-Groves
    Acute Care: Pulmonary Hypertension
  • “ST-elevation rules! If you see ST-elevation in a patient complaining of chest pain, assume acute ischemia.”
    Dr. Andrea Efre
    Acute Care: Chest Pain: Refine Your Assessment Skills and Define Your Differential Diagnosis
  • “When someone wants ‘everything done,’ our next question should be ‘what does that mean to you?’”
    Debbie A. Gunter, FNP-BC, ACHPN
    Talking about Dying Won’t Kill You! How to Talk with Patients about Terminal Illness
Here’s a look at my time at these two Lippincott conferences. Hope to see you next fall at NCNP2016 Fall and Nursing Management Congress!

 

 
Posted: 5/25/2016 8:57:58 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Video]

Nursing is a fluid and dynamic profession that is constantly changing for the better. In 2016, there are six key trends happening in nursing around the world that every nurse needs to know.

In the video below, Wolters Kluwer, Health, Learning, Research and Practice Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC presents these trends and offers three learning objectives:

Learning Objectives
•    Identify the factors that are influencing nursing and health care
•    Identify macro trends in nursing from a U.S. and global level
•    Identify ways to meet the changing paradigms of health care on a national and international level

The six key trends that are happing in nursing around the globe in 2016 include:

Macro Trends in Nursing 2016
•    Learning from nursing’s past
•    Global growth in nursing
•    Life-long learning
•    A changing nursing workforce
•    Evidenced-based practice
•    Using technology to improve global health

Watch the video below and be on the lookout for specially-created infographics around each macro trend in nursing coming soon to our blog! 

 
Posted: 5/24/2016 8:36:23 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Wolters Kluwer nursing journals sweep ASHPE awards

ashpe-award_2016-(2).jpgIn 2016, Wolters Kluwer’s nursing journals won 24 times in the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE) awards! Our winners were in the Editorial, Graphic and Online categories, and we are especially excited that Lippincott NursingCenter.com won gold for Best Use of Social Media for National Nurses Week 2015.  

The award-winning nursing journals from Wolters Kluwer are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you! For the full list of award-winners, visit ASHPE’s website

Publication of the Year: Emergency Medicine News

GOLD
Best Feature Article: American Journal of Nursing (Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report)
Best Legislative/Government Article: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (Learning From New York City)
Best Use of Social Media: Lippincott NursingCenter.com
Best Cover Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (After the Trenches: Spiritual Care of Veterans)
Best Peer Reviewed Journal: American Journal of Nursing

SILVER
Best Feature Article Series: Nursing2016 (Pregnancy in Crisis)
Best New Department: Nursing Management (Care Transitions)
Best Feature Article: Nursing made Incredibly Easy! (The truth about human trafficking)
Best Profile: Neurology Now (A leader takes on brain disease)
Best Peer-Reviewed Journal: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Best Special Supplement, Annual or Buyer’s Guide: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Soft-Tissue Fillers and Neuromodulators: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives

BRONZE
Best News Coverage: Neurology Today (AAN's Call for Repeal of MOC Part IV Awaits Action from Credentialing Board)
Best Regular Department: Neurology Now (For the Caregiver)
Best Commentary: The Hearing Journal (Do or die for hearing aid industry
Best Legislative/Government Article: The Nurse Practitioner (27th Annual Legislative Update: Advancements continue for APRN practice)
Best Blog: American Journal of Nursing (Off the charts)
Best Cover Photo: American Journal of Nursing (Faces of Caring: Nurses at Work)
Best Feature Article: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Original Research: CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing (Social Media: The Key to Health Information Access for 18- to 30-Year-Old College Students)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Computer-Generated: Journal of Christian Nursing (Nursing for the Kingdom of God)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing (Womb Outsourcing: Commercial Surrogacy in India)
Best Website/Online Presence of a Publication: PRS Global Open

 
Posted: 5/17/2016 8:28:55 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


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