Read these award-winners!

Last month, 21 Apex Awards were presented to journals published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. These awards are based on “excellence in graphic design, editorial content and the ability to achieve overall communications excellence.” The award-winning articles from our nursing journals are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you!

 Shining a Light on Hoarding Disorder
Nursing2013

 Responding To an Active Shooter and Other Threats of Violence 
Nursing2013

 25th Annual Legislative Update: Evidence-Based Practice Reforms Improve Access to APRN Care 
The Nurse Practitioner: The American Journal of Primary Health Care 

 The Hard Truth about Human Trafficking 
Nursing Management

 IT Extra: Technology Management Strategies for Nurse Leaders  
Nursing Management

 Smart Management: Recruitment And Retention: How To Get Them And How To Keep Them
OR Nurse 2013

 Smart Management: High reliability Organizations: An Idea Worth Pursuing 
OR Nurse 2013

 Smart Management: Build Your Staff's Leadership Skills 
OR Nurse 2013

 Managing Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
OR Nurse 2013

 Editorial: A Grassroots Movement Sounds the Call 
American Journal of Nursing

 


Cover Image from January 2014 issue of American Journal of Nursing


January 2013 issue of Nursing2013 Critical Care

Posted: 7/3/2014 5:03:01 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Nurse On the Move: Jeff Doucette

“The number one thing that a nurse can do is guard their integrity as if it is their most prized possession.” Jeff Doucette DNP, RN, FACHE, CENP, understands just how small the nursing community is. Regardless of where a nurse works, their actions and choices will follow them, he explains. 

With a career like his, he should know. Doucette is currently the vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at Bon Secours Mary Immaculate Hospital in Newport News, Va. He is an executive nurse fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, as well as adjunct faculty in the DNP program at Old Dominion University. He is also the chairperson for Nursing Management Congress2015 and on the editorial advisory board for the Nursing Management journal. 

This month, I had the opportunity to speak with Doucette, our next Nurse On the Move, and learn why integrity is a nurse’s most valuable asset. We also discussed why Lean management can improve healthcare, what Nursing Management Congress has planned this year, and what he sees for the future of nursing. 

Listen for the whole interview...

*Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 

 

Posted: 1/29/2015 7:20:50 PM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: JoAnne Phillips

“Nursing is the toughest job you will ever love.” JoAnne Phillips MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS, recognizes that hard work can produce gratifying results. As a manager of quality and patient safety at Penn Home Care & Hospice Services, a clinical informatics professional development specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and a doctoral student working towards her DNP at Vanderbilt University, Phillips doesn’t take her role as a nurse lightly. She is constantly looking to improve the quality of life of those around her, which is why she is our next Nurse On the Move

Phillips preiously served as a clinical nurse specialist in the transition, surgical critical care, and patient safety departments of the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her master’s degree in science in critical care nursing from Widener University, and prior to that, she served as a clinical instructor and staff nurse at Hahnemann University Hospital. 

Through our interview, I learned why Phillips chose to go back to school, as well as why she sees nursing as the best job to make a difference in a person’s life. 

Q: What made you choose nursing as a career?
A: When I was hospitalized as a child, I watched what the nurses were doing and I thought that is what I wanted to do. When I was older, I worked as a volunteer in the neonatal intensive care nursery. Then I knew that was what I wanted to do. I can’t exactly say it was a calling, but pretty close. 

Q: What is your favorite aspect of being a critical care nurse?
A: I had the opportunity to work at the Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where I truly learned the impactful role that a primary nurse could play in the patient’s outcome.  Patients could be incredibly sick, and I knew that the best medical care partnered with the best nursing care could lead to the best patient outcomes. As a lifelong learner, I thrived on the constant opportunity to learn more in critical care. 

Q: You specialize in patient safety. What is the biggest concern you have regarding the well-being of patients and how are you combatting it?
A: I don’t think patient safety is one issue, but a virtual kaleidoscope of issues. We need to better understand how systems work together and the role human factors (how we interact with processes and technology). Since humans will always be part of the equation, we need to know that there will be mistakes. Our role as safety leaders is to make it less likely that humans will make a mistake. Something I tell my colleagues, “If we make it easy for people to do the right thing, they will do the right thing.  If we make it too complex, they will do workarounds.” That is often where we see negative outcomes. 

Q: In your role as a clinical informatics educator, why do you feel informatics is important to nursing?
A: I would encourage nurses to work toward letting the computer work for you, instead of you working for the computer. We hear from staff that documenting in the computer is too hard. My response is that we have not designed the system correctly. One of the staff told me it takes eight clicks to chart a dirty diaper – a great example that we have made it too hard. Bottom line is [computers] are here to stay; [they are] an unbelievable resource of information.  Once we have better interoperability (computer systems talking to each other), it will be awesome. 

Q: You are working towards earning your DNP. What made you decide to go back to school?
A: The more I learn about patient safety, the more I realize to work toward a solution, I needed to understand even more about systems. My DNP program is focused on health systems management, and I believe it will position me to take a leadership role in patient safety, to mentor and develop many others to understand how we can create a safe environment for our staff and patients. 

Q: What is the most vital thing a nurse can do to improve their career?
A: To be a nurse today, I think you need to be a lifelong learner. Not just in an academic setting, but through ongoing personal and professional development. There are endless opportunities for nurses to learn and develop – conferences, memberships in professional organizations, online learning.  If finances are a struggle, many of these opportunities are free.   

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?  
A: Nurses are the solution to the future of healthcare. We spend 75% of our healthcare dollars on chronic care. There is no one better positioned to manage patients with chronic, complex medical issues than a nurse. We need to create an environment that will draw and keep the best people in nursing. What better job is there than to know that you made a difference in someone’s life? Even if that difference is helping them to a peaceful death. As many have said before, nursing is the toughest job you will ever love. 

Do you work with a nurse that inspires you? Nominate them to be our next Nurse On the Move by emailing submissions to ClinicalEd

Posted: 11/4/2014 7:43:41 PM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


NursingCenter Named Top Blog for Nurses

Last week, NursingCenter’s In the Round was named one of the Top 100 Nursing Blogs by BestMedicalAssistantPrograms.org, and we couldn’t be more excited! Listed among a variety of blogs dedicated to nursing students, RN’s, NP’s, educators, travel nurses, and more, our blog is described as a site “dedicated to helping nurses be the best workers they can be.” Three of our recent posts are also cited as favorites, including:

Directing Nurses Back to Patient Care
Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents for the U.N.
Nurses Who Led the Way: Florence Nightingale

We are honored to be a part of this list and to be featured among some of the best blogs for nurses out there. We want to ensure the nursing community stays connected, so here is a list of our favorite blogs for nurses (these are listed in alphabetical order): 

AJN Off the Charts
ANS: Advances in Nursing Science Blog
CorrectionalNurse.net
JParadisi RN's Blog
Not Nurse Ratched 
Nurse Code
The Adventures of Nurse Niki
What Should We Call Nursing 

Thank you to all of the sites that have included us as a top resource for nurses in the past, including OnlineLPNtoRN.org, OnlineColleges.com, CorrectionalNurse.net, LVNtoRN.net, and Jacksonville University’s School of Nursing. We are grateful for the recognition and aim to continue to provide excellent content for nurses. 

What are some of your favorite nursing blogs? Leave them in the comments below! 

Posted: 10/2/2014 7:48:49 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Join our nursing community!

Since starting at Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com this past January as their Digital Editor, my favorite part about my job is talking with our nurses and members. I really enjoy the sense of community I get from speaking with nurses, whether it is in person at one of our conferences, over the phone at my desk, or on this blog. 

Another great resource for our community is our social media sites. Both our Clinical Editor, Lisa Morris Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP, and myself regularly update our accounts and use them as important tools to reach out to our nurses. I love seeing what people are talking about, how they are responding to current issues, and getting feedback from our followers. 

Social media is one of the best ways to reach us, so I invite you to join our nursing community by following us on Twitter @NursingCenter or @CaraGavin, Google+, Facebook, and LinkedIn. We want to hear from you! 

Posted: 9/30/2014 7:53:33 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Technology


Nurses On the Move: Paula Roe

As fall gets underway and nurses head back to school, it’s important to look at how academic and professional education can shape a nurse in different ways.

September’s Nurse On the Move,Paula Roe BSN, MBA/HCM, FACHE, has a unique experience with nursing. She currently serves Simpler Consulting as a senior advisor - where she helps clients achieve sustainable breakthrough improvements in care quality, productivity, and cost reduction by applying process improvement techniques to daily operations – and operational excellence practice leader, responsible for Simpler’s internal process improvement.

She previously spent six years as the vice president of operations for St. Elizabeth Healthcare, a regional hospital system located in northern Kentucky. Before that, Roe spent 13 years with the Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing American, where she learned the tools of the Lean management trade.Roe’s experiences have shaped her perspective as a nurse and operations leader. Through our interview, I discovered how these different settings impacted her thoughts on nursing and patient care. 

Q: Why did you choose to receive your BSN and start your nursing career?
A: A career in nursing was not my original plan. When I enrolled at Ohio State University, I was on course for a degree in engineering. By my sophomore year…I was forced to take the pre-medical school-level anatomy class to fulfill an undergraduate requirement. As soon as the class was underway, I knew I was hooked. I soon met with my advisor and found that nursing was the best match for me.

Q: You went on to manage a CTU/SICU department of a hospital. How did this shape your decision to earn your MBA in health care management?
A: Early in my nursing career, I was involved in staff nurse counsel and had the opportunity to present to hospital administration on a regular basis. I really enjoyed this interaction and pursued hospital administration as department manager of the CTU/SICU. When I went to work for Toyota as a safety, health and environmental administrator, I never lost that dream of working in healthcare administration. Lucky for me, Toyota offered MBA programs on campus, and I was able to earn my master’s degree specifically for healthcare management. 

Q: Please describe what Lean management means to you and why you believe it’s an important tool for nurses to use?
A: Lean is all about delivering value to the customer. From a nursing perspective, the customer is the patient and the patient’s family. When you think about nursing and the tenants of Lean – striving for zero defects, the relentless pursuit of value, and the delivery of service in the least wasteful way – the two are necessarily harmonious…The delivery of care is spending time with the patient and delivering care value. We need to relentlessly pursue the elimination of wasteful steps, challenging our day-to-day activities to spend more time with patients and deliver the best care in the least wasteful way. 

Q: In your role at Toyota, how did Lean management practices and role process improvement techniques shape your perspective as a nurse and operations leader?
A: When you start a career with Toyota, you start a lifelong journey of hands-on learning. The training advances as you practice and apply these Lean skills. Lean is also a team-based model; it allows teams to bring their ideas and thoughts together so the whole group is focused on what matters most. But with Lean, the team makes decisions together on execution and output as well. And action is immediate, meaning you are able to achieve breakthrough results within a very short time. I very quickly saw how Lean’s team-based approach could be applied to the nursing world.

Q: How do you define a nurse leader?
A: I came across not long ago a quote from renowned leadership expert Dr. Stephen Covey: “Leaders do what’s right and managers do the right thing.” To me, a nursing leader is one who does what’s right for his or her staff, the patient, the organization, and the population served.. 

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?
A: I believe that nursing will continue to be developed from within the profession and innovative ways to deliver care and patient treatment models will emerge. But, nurses will have to also look outside of nursing for solution approaches. I foresee Lean and other management techniques more widely accessed. I believe the pace of change in the industry is going to require new and breakthrough ways of looking at things, and traditional improvement approaches are going to be challenged. As Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” In nursing, we’ll need to think outside of the traditional nursing box to eliminate waste and to ultimately spend more by the patient bedside.

Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 9/19/2014 8:10:47 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Are you ready to go back to school?

Deciding whether to go back to school for your advanced degree can be a difficult decision. Whether you are a registered nurse with an associate’s degree looking at bachelor’s degree programs, or an advanced practice nurse thinking about a doctorate, there’s so many factors that go into making the decision, including timing, money, availability, and program options, it can be hard figuring out if you are really ready for that next step.

For further insight into this issue, I spoke with Wolters Kluwer Medical Research Division and NursingCenter’s chief nurse, Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, who received her doctorate in nursing practice this May from Texas Christian University. Dr. Woods has been a nurse for more than 30 years and a nurse practitioner for 16 years. Currently, she serves as our chief nurse, as well as the publisher of the American Journal of Nursing and the Joanna Briggs Resources. She also works as a critical care nurse practitioner every weekend, while also serving as adjunct faculty for Drexel University.

Although Dr. Woods certainly has enough on her plate, she still chose to go back and get her doctorate. “The way healthcare is evolving,” says Dr.Woods, “I needed to go back for my doctorate to learn the skills, resources, and tools I need to really be effective in the market.” She sees the pursuit of higher education as a major trend across the profession. “Transitioning nurses who have their associate’s degree or diploma to a bachelor’s degree is really important. There are skillsets they haven’t learned before, and a bachelor’s degree will really help them in their practice. The other big push I see is advanced practice nurses going back for their DNP. It’s really only been in the last 10 years that we’ve had the ability to have a practice doctorate. The Future of Nursing initiative and the LACE model of nursing is that by 2015, all of these advance practice programs should be DNP.”

Once she decided to pursue a doctorate, Dr. Woods knew it was going to be costly, which is a major concern for most nurses contemplating higher learning. She explains, “It’s really expensive to go to school. Nurses need to do their homework and find out where they can obtain funding – scholarships, grant money, student loans.” Earning an advance degree is pricey, but Dr. Woods knows the value of an education. She says, “Even though it’s really expensive, and I probably won’t make any more money from having it, I feel that I am a better nurse and nurse practitioner by having it. [Nursing] is about being able to provide better care for the patients, the community, and people on a global perspective…It’s never about the money. It’s about practicing to the fullest potential that you can practice and providing the best care to our patients.”

Money isn’t the only issue for nurses looking for more education. Many nurses continue to work fulltime, while balancing families, friends, and other responsibilities. This was no different for Dr. Woods, who says, “The biggest challenge for me was time management. I work fulltime, and, I practice every weekend as a critical care nurse practitioner. Trying to fit in school work, even though it was a part-time online program, was challenging. The course work wasn’t hard; it’s the amount of work and the time it takes to do that work that is hard.” Being prepared for the commitment in cost and time is crucial to earning an advanced degree.

After the sacrifices she made to earn her doctorate, Dr. Woods already sees the benefit of her choice, only three months after graduation. She says, “As a DNP now working every weekend with nurses, they have really embraced my new degree and will ask me how they can think differently about this situation or what they are missing. I find myself doing a lot more teaching about things related to patient care or ethics of care. Now, I can help the nurse look differently at these issues.” And she doesn’t plan to stop learning any time soon. Dr. Woods explains, “I’m going forward to get some additional certifications to be the best healthcare professional, the best nurse practitioner, the best nurse I can be.”

Choosing the path of higher learning isn’t for everyone. Those who do take on this challenge, however, understand the immense benefit to not only themselves, but to the nursing community as a whole. Now, are you ready to go back to school?

More Reading & Resources
Achieving Your BSN
Achieving Your Advanced Nursing Degree
Should Your Nurses Be Required to Earn a BSN?
Lifelong Learning in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

Posted: 8/25/2014 8:31:22 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Nurses On the Move: Lorry Schoenly

Nurses work in all types of environments. Whether it is an ER, university, military, consulting firm, or even a prison, the role of the nurse goes far beyond the typical hospital setting.

July’s Nurse On the Move, Lorry Schoenly PhD, RN, CCHP-RN, is a correctional healthcare risk consultant for jail and prison clients. She also currently serves as part of the faculty at the Chamberlain College of Nursing and writes a monthly column on correctional healthcare issues, along with podcasts.

Schoenly previously served as the director of education of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses and assistant vice president of Rancocas Hospital, among other titles. She started her career as a staff nurse. She received her bachelor’s of nursing from Excelsior College and earned both her master’s in burns, emergency, and trauma, and doctorate in nursing from Widener University.

Through our interview, I learned why Schoenly went into correctional nursing and what daily reminder she has for nurses.

Q: Why did you decide to become a nurse?
A:  I never imagined being a nurse while growing up. I come from a family of educators. While in critical care after the difficult delivery of our son, I looked around at the nurses scurrying about and thought, "These folks are doing meaningful work.” I was hooked.

Q: You started as a staff nurse and remained in that role for a little over three years. What motivated you to continue your education and become a staff instructor and, eventually, a director of education?
A:  I guess I have always been an educator at heart. As a staff nurse…I was like a sponge soaking up information from any inservice or continuing education course I could find. I was thrilled to apply and be accepted [to a staff development position]…where I was able to continue in patient care, while managing the orientation of new staff and creating inservices for new treatment and equipment. For me, it was an ideal combination.

Q: As a nurse educator, what advice do you have to inspire others to further their education?
A:  You can almost never go wrong with education. One of the joys of nursing is the wide array of opportunities. If you are unhappy in your current position, research other options and determine what is needed for an entry-level position. Enjoy the journey and seek to apply everything you learn in the classroom into your current work experiences.

Q: How did you become interested in correctional nursing?
A:  Like many in our specialty, I am an accidental correctional nurse. I don't know anyone who announced as a child that they wanted to be a jail nurse when they grew up. In fact, it had never occurred to me that nurses worked in jails and prisons until I answered an advertisement for a nurse educator position in the NJ prison system. However, once I saw the great need for nursing care and nursing caring behind bars, I saw an opportunity to bring my skills and abilities to bear both locally and nationally. Correctional nurses care for a vulnerable, marginalized, and very needy patient population. And, it takes grit and determination to work in that environment day after day. I see firsthand the struggles correctional nurses have in the low resourced and ethically challenging criminal justice system. I do what I can to support their efforts.

Q: As a correctional healthcare consultant, what is your biggest challenge related to patient care?
A: The greatest challenge I face when helping improve patient care is organizational culture. Pervasive attitudes among team members are hard to eradicate. We want quick fixes, whether it be losing weight, getting dinner on the table, or improving a relationship. It is the same in healthcare. Leaders want to write a policy, inservice staff, and then move on to the next thing on the list. It doesn't work like that in organizations, even though we wish it would!

Q: If you could give nurses a daily reminder, what would it be?
A: The encouragement I use at the end of each of my Correctional Nursing Today podcasts is to "Make today count for good.”  As nurses, we always have an opportunity to make a difference in someone's life, and I try to remind myself of that regularly. A quotation on the whiteboard of my office that encourages me is from Goethe, "Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do,” As an educator, I try to continually encourage others to apply what they are learning, otherwise it is for naught.

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?
A:  The future of nursing is bright as we move forward. There are many opportunities for nurses to make a difference, no matter the position or location. Correctional nursing, in particular, is advancing as a specialty, and I am delighted to be a part of it!

Posted: 7/31/2014 8:39:12 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Directing nurses back to patient care

What made you decide to become a nurse? Was it the thrill of directly impacting a patient’s life? Or, was it because you really love tracking down medications and filling out paperwork? I’m going to guess it wasn’t the latter, and the people at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement agree.

In a recent article this week in the Wall Street Journal, Laura Landro explored the institute’s new partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to develop Transforming Care at the Bedside, a program “to help hospitals increase to 70% the amount of time nurses spend in direct patient care while improving the work environment for nurses.”

This initiative attempts to answer the increasing need to streamline the work nurses are doing, while improving nurses’ delegation practices, “shifting more routine tasks to certified nurse assistants and other less high skilled staffers.” In an interview between Landro and Patricia Rutherford, a nurse and vice president at the institute, Rutherford explained, “We shouldn’t be using expensive professional nursing time doing unnecessary and inefficient things when that time could be reinvested in direct patient care.”

The institute isn’t the first to notice the lack of time nurses are spending with patients. In 2008, the American Journal of Nursing published a series of studies that found direct patient care “accounts for less than 50% of working hours.”

NursingCenter’s own clinical editor, Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP, remembers her frustrations at the bedside. “Patient care is what nursing is all about. I can remember clearly being pulled away from the bedside searching for supplies or medications, or even fixing or calibrating equipment. One time, I was caring for a patient admitted with DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), who needed finger stick blood glucose checks every hour for titration of his insulin drip. We had two machines on our unit and one was broken. At about my third hour of the shift, the machine that was working needed to be calibrated…[which] took quite some time. This event not only took me away from the bedside, but put him at risk as I was unable to check his blood sugar for about two hours. Fortunately, no untoward events occurred, but I remember thinking at the time, ‘There’s got to be a better way!’”

Studies show the more time a nurse is at the bedside, the better the outcomes. Bonsall explains, “The relationship between patient safety and nursing care is documented in the research, including direct impacts on healthcare-associated infection, readmission rates, and mortality. We are the ones noticing the subtle changes in a patient’s status. If we are repeatedly pulled away from the bedside, those changes can go unnoticed.”

In a 2010 internal audit conducted by Presbyterian Medical Center, it was discovered that “nurses were involved in direct patient care at the bedside for only 2.5 hours every 12-hour shift.” Nurses were spending too much time searching for missing test results and supplies and not enough time monitoring their patients. After implementing the Transforming Care at the Bedside program, the center was hitting “6.5 hours per shift at the end of 2013 with a goal to hit 8.5 hours by the end of 2015.”

Time will tell if the center is able to hit their goal. But, as more hospitals begin to take a robust approach at managing their nurses’ time and delegation strategies, the hope is to return nurses back to why they began their work in the first place – to care for the patients.

Posted: 7/25/2014 8:50:08 PM by Cara Gavin | with 3 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Nurses On the Move: Helene Bowen-Brady

As summer heats up, so do the incredible nurses who focus on the hottest professional topics.

This month’s
Nurse On the Move is Helene Bowen-Brady, M.Ed, BSN, RN-BC, the program manager for professional development at Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital. Not only does she focus on guiding the Department of Nursing on a Magnet Journey, but she also sits on the Steering Committee for the CLCDN (Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing), and recently served as the site coordinator for an international nursing research project.

Bowen-Brady previously served as a nurse educator, lactation consultant, and school nurse, all while raising her four children. She received her BSN from Boston College. She also earned a master’s degree and is currently exploring doctoral programs.

I interviewed Bowen-Brady to discover what drew her to such different roles in nursing and what she sees for the profession in the future.

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?

A: Honestly, I wasn’t sure when I was 16 what I wanted to do. In the early 70’s, the career advice I received was to become either a teacher or a nurse. In the end, the motivation was simply that nurses who went to diploma schools got to live away at school, and if I became a teacher, I would have to commute to college. At 16, it was a very easy decision – I wanted to live away.  In retrospect, it was the best decision for me. As a nurse, I have had an incredible career.

Q: You worked with Canton public schools as a school nurse. How was that working environment and why did you choose to pursue a different venue for nursing?

A: I started working as a substitute nurse because the hours worked for my family. Little did I know what a great career move that would turn out to be and what wonderful clinical and leadership experiences school nursing would provide. In all of the nursing roles that I have had, I think that school nursing was probably the most challenging. School nurses work independently in most settings to manage a variety of complex acute and chronic healthcare needs for students of all ages.

Q: You were previously a lactation consultant. What drew you to that role?

A: Personal need – when my first son was born there was limited, if any, support for breastfeeding mothers in my community. When I worked as a VNA nurse, I was fortunate to work with an innovative nurse director who supported me to expand the services we provided for families with newborns.

Q: What encouraged you to continue your education as a nurse?

A: I believe that lifelong learning is essential for every nurse. The knowledge I gain from reading journal articles, attending classes, listening to webinars, or taking an online class absolutely helps me to be a better practitioner.

Q: You’ve spent a good amount of your career working in staff development and education. How has professional development changed over the years, if at all?

A: The biggest change is the technology. When I first became an educator in 1980, I had to handwrite every lecture, which was then typed by the department secretary since she was the only person with a typewriter. Finding relevant journal articles meant a trip to a hospital library or a local college. Today, I have countless electronic folders stored on my computer. Search engines make it easy to find reliable and current information about any topic. There are so many new and innovative technological strategies and tools that educators can use to engage adult learners in order to positively enhance learning activities to make them more meaningful for staff.

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?

A: When I entered nursing school in the early 70’s, healthcare was primarily provided in the acute care hospital. Over the past 40 years, healthcare has changed dramatically. Nurses have an opportunity to play key roles in the future of healthcare and most of these expanded roles will be outside of the inpatient setting. I truly believe that the changes ahead will prove to be in the best interest of our patients and families.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?

A: It would be to encourage nurses to get involved. Step outside the comfort zone of the unit or area you work in – join a committee at work or the professional organization that represents your practice area’s local chapter. There are so many incredibly talented and innovative nurses within the profession that each one of us can learn from. 

Posted: 6/24/2014 9:07:03 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses On the Move: Karlene Kerfoot

National Nurses Week ended May 12th. It was a great opportunity to reflect on the important nurses who changed the course of the profession.

nd them. In recognition, we honor a NursingCenter member, Karlene Kerfoot PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, as this month’s Nurse On the Move. Currently the Chief Clinical Integration Officer at API, Kerfoot also worked in patient care administration, clinical practice, and healthcare consulting. She served in adjunct academic positions and was the Corporate Chief Nursing and Patient Care Officer at three of the largest healthcare systems in the U.S. She earned a doctorate in nursing from the University of Illinois and a master’s and BSN from the University of Iowa.

 

I spoke with her to learn a little more about her outstanding work and to discover what she sees for the future of nursing.

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A: Well, it wasn’t my first choice. I wanted to go into political science, but there were limited jobs there. I know I wanted to make a difference. With nursing, it’s a great opportunity. You can travel and do different things. I forgot about political science and never looked back.

Q: What encouraged you to continue your education as a nurse?
A: I wanted to be able to have a choice of options as I got older. With a master’s or a PhD, you have more choices. I know I wanted to work in a complex setting where I could combine research and so on. I thought, “20 years from now, what will people want? They’ll want advanced degrees. I better get busy!”

Q: In your current role, what is the biggest challenge you face?
A: My biggest challenge is that many technology firms have technology people developing applications, but on the client side, the applications lack client input. I need to make sure they fit and that they are what’s needed out there and are relevant to the frontline clinical person.

Q: Nurses Week was celebrated May 6-12th. Why do you believe this week is important?
A: It’s important to understand your history and future. There are so many people who have changed the course of history, for instance Florence Nightingale. They are fabulous role models for people to look at and think, “I can change history too.”

Q: What are the top four ways nurses can avoid holding back their careers?
A: The first way to avoid holding back your career is to learn positive discontentment. Florence Nightingale said, “If you’re not moving forward, you’re moving backward.” We need to value innovative people, especially those who take a positive outlook on things and who can offer solutions, not just complaints.

Second, practice “No Excuse” career development. Florence Nightingale was discontent, and it pushed her to make changes [not just give up].

Third, talk about your work in measurable outcomes. Saying “I did good work” isn’t good enough anymore. In the last 10-15 years, there’s been a push for measurement. Give examples that show things happened because of you.

Fourth, become agile with technology. Technology is everywhere. Look for what’s coming in the future and what it will mean to patients. It’s like a language you need to understand.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?
A: Look ahead and think about what people will need in the future and how you can provide it. You are your own company, so you need to prepare for the future. Every three to five months, practice strategic thinking, “What have I learned and what do I need to learn?”

Q: Finally, what do you envision for the future of nursing?
A: I wish, as time goes on, nurses will be more empowered. The public says nurses are the most trusted workers and they should be involved in healthcare policy and reform. I would hope nurses become more prepared to sit at those tables and to a make a difference because nurses are the spokesperson for the patient.

Do you know the perfect nurse to be featured for Nurses On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 5/19/2014 9:12:40 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Florence Nightingale

The founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, was born on May 12, 1820, so it is only fitting that we end Nurses Week on her birthday. Despite her wealthy parents’ wishes to live a conventional upper class life, Nightingale desired to serve others and entered into nursing by studying in Germany in 1851. By 1853, she became the superintendent at a hospital for gentlewomen. 

In 1854, the Crimean War started and Nightingale traveled to Turkey to head a team of nurses in the British military hospitals. During the war, she witnessed the horrible sanitary conditions while overseeing 38 nurses at Scutari. Using statistical data analysis, she was able to lower medical facilities’ mortality rates, and she pushed for reform in all British military hospitals. 

She founded the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St. Thomas' Hospital in London in 1860. Using her Environment Theory, otherwise called the "Nightingale Model," she trained nurses and then sent them to work in facilities all over Britain. Her nursing theories were published in Notes on Nursing in 1860. 

Nightingale received the title of Lady of Grace of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem and became the first woman to receive the Order of Merit. After her death in 1910, her family declined a state funeral and burial in Westminster Abbey and buried her in the family plot in St. Margaret’s Church in East Wellow, Hampshire.

Posted: 5/12/2014 9:16:34 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


CEConnection for Allied Health Professionals

Did you know Lippincott has its own CEConnection tailor-made for allied health professionals? This one-stop resource hosts more than 110 continuing education courses design to help allied health workers improve patient outcomes with activities based on evidence-based practice guidelines. 

This platform offers peer-reviewed multimedia and interactive content from Lippincott journals. The platform is also customizable for institutions and individuals. You can track courses using your own My Planner tab, enabling you to add activities to do now or save for later. You are also able to browse courses by categories, including clinical, topic, specialty, and profession. Once you add an education activity, it’s displayed in your planner, as well as your Shopping Cart. 

Allied Health’s CEConnection currently covers courses for 12 professions, including:

Addiction Counselor
Cardiovascular Technologist
Case Manager
Clinical Laboratory Scientist
Dietetic Professional
Healthcare Quality Professional
Pathology Technologist
Pharmacist
Physical Therapist
Respiratory Therapist
Radiologic Technologist
Speech-Language Pathologist

Each month, new courses and additional allied health specialties are added. 

CEConnection for allied health professionals is available for institutional and individual purchase. Healthcare institutions and specialists interested in this platform can get more information by calling 855-695-5070 or sending an email to Sales@LippincottSolutions.com.

Posted: 4/18/2014 2:50:49 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Nursing eBooks

Did you know that Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com houses more than 25 different nursing eBooks? From books on evidence-based practice to infusion coding to LGBTQ cultures, you are sure to find an interesting topic worth reading about. Book purchases include an eReader format for download to a device such as an iPad, Nook, or Kindle. 

Let’s take a look at some of the eBooks our site has to offer:

AJN's Evidence-Based Practice Series: Step by Step
Better your evidence-based practice through a series of articles from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. 

Ten Years of Teaching and Learning Moments
This eBook includes brief vignettes that chronicle the first-person experiences of teachers, students, and patients as they learn about the science and the art of medicine. It derives its content from the first 10 years of the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the journal, Academic Medicine

The Editor's Handbook: An Online Resource and CE Course
Designed for journal editors, this eBook explores  impact factors, journal indexing, budgeting, journal development, editorial board composition, and the peer review process. 

LGBTQ Cultures: What Health Care Professionals Need to Know About Sexual and Gender Diversity 
Intended to serve as an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) health issues, this eBook helps healthcare professionals create safe environments for patients, as well as their LGBTQ coworkers. 

Synthesis Science in Healthcare Book Series (Books 1-18)
The Joanna Briggs Institute offers this eBook series for individual purchases of $19.99 or books 1-18 for $220. Books 1-18 will help you understand the JBI model of evidence-based healthcare, appraise qualitative and quantitative research, appraise evidence from intervention and diagnostic accuracy studies, and learn ways to minimize risks from adverse events. 

Nurse Practitioner 2012 Liability Update: A Three-part Approach 
Celebrate the CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO)’s 20th anniversary (in 2012) of the nurse practitioner professional liability insurance program with this free eBook. 

Understanding Nurse Liability, 2006 – 2010: A Three-part Approach 
The CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO) aim to educate nurses about risk with this free eBook, which focuses on nurse closed claims over a five-year period. 

Lessons from a Visionary Leader 
Richard Hader, the long-standing and highly-respected late Editor-in-Chief of the Nursing Management journal, offers advice to leaders in healthcare organizations on how to be courageous, creative, take risks, and say “no.”

Posted: 4/7/2014 3:01:23 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


The number of male nurses is on the rise

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of men entering the nursing profession has tripled since 1970. The study, which tracks data through 2011, shows an increase from 2.7 to 9.6 percent, meaning about 330,000 men are working as nurses to date. 

To celebrate and encourage more men entering the profession, here is some nursing content related to male nurses on NursingCenter.com. 

Continuing Education Activities
 Men in Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, January 2013
Expires: 1/31/2015 

 Original Research: 'How Should I Touch You?': A Qualitative Study of Attitudes on Intimate Touch in Nursing Care, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, March 2011
Expires: 3/31/2015 

Journal Articles
 Team concepts: The nurse in the man: Lifting up nursing or lifting himself?, Nursing Management, June 2013 

 ISSUES IN NURSING: Men work here too: How men can thrive in maternal-newborn nursing, Nursing2014, March 2013 

 Online Exclusive: Are male nurses emotionally intelligent?, Nursing Management, April 2012

 Recruitment & Retention Report: EXTRA Young adults' perception of an ideal career Does gender matter?, Nursing Management, April 2011 

 Gender and Professional Values: A Closer Look, Nursing Management, January 2011 

 Letters: Men and Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, April 2013 

Posted: 3/24/2014 3:09:28 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Nurses who led the way: Loretta C. Ford

Dr. Loretta C. Ford is an internationally recognized leader in nursing and the founder of the nurse practitioner movement, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. She received her diploma in nursing in 1942 from Middlesex General Hospital in New Jersey and started her nursing career as a staff nurse for the Visiting Nurses’ Association. After serving as first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Force for three years, Ford earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Colorado School of Nursing. In 1961, she earned her doctorate of education from the University of Colorado School of Education.

Ford, along with pediatrician Henry K. Silver, was offered a grant from the University of Colorado in 1965 to create a demonstration project to expand the role of nurses in healthcare. After publishing their findings, they created a curriculum to educate nurse practitioners. The program gained national success, and Ford became the founding dean of the University of Rochester School of Nursing in 1972. 

She wrote more than 100 publications, earned six honorary doctorates, and received numerous awards, including the Gustav Lienhard Medal from the Institute of Medicine, the Living Legend Award from the American Academy of Nursing, and the American College of Nurse Practitioner’s Crystal Trailblazer Award.

Today, Ford continues to lecture on the nurse practitioner movement. 

Posted: 5/12/2014 4:13:56 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Virginia Avenel Henderson

Regarded as one of the most famous nurses in history, Virginia Avenel Henderson is credited with developing a nursing theory, in which she defined the role of nurses in healthcare. Henderson was trained at the Army School of Nursing in 1921, and she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the Teachers College in Columbia University. She started as a public health nurse at the Henry Street Settlement in New York City and soon became the first full-time nursing instructor at the Norfolk Protestant School of Nursing. 

In 1953, Henderson began teaching at the Yale School of Nursing and continued to teach there with emeritus status until 1996. She wrote and published numerous textbooks throughout her career, as well as The Nursing Studies Index, a 12-year project in which she covered the first 60 years of nursing research. Her nursing theory, the “Henderson Model,” is used internationally as a standard for nursing practice. 

Henderson received 13 honorary degrees, was inducted into the American Nurses Association Hall of Fame, and was awarded the most prestigious honor in nursing, the Christiane Reimann Prize, by the International Council of Nurses. 

She died in 1996 at the age of 98 in Connecticut. She is still known today as “the first lady of nursing.”

Posted: 5/11/2014 4:16:55 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Mary Eliza Mahoney

Mary Eliza Mahoney was the first African-American professional nurse in the United States. She dedicated her life to the profession, starting by working for 15 years in the New England Hospital for Women and Children before enrolling in its nursing program. She was one out of only four nurses to graduate out of a program of 42 students. 

After graduation, Mahoney became a member of the American Nurses Association (ANA) and helped establish the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses in 1908. She was elected the chaplain of the association in 1909 and received lifetime membership status. 

Mahoney also fought for women’s rights. At the age of 74, she became one of the first women to register to vote in Boston. Later, she continued her work as a nurse at the Howard Orphan Asylum before she retired.

Mahoney passed away from breast cancer at 80-years-old. Today, ANA offers an award in her name every year to members who strive to ease racial obstacles. She has been inducted into the Nursing Hall of Fame and the National Women’s Hall of Fame. 

Posted: 5/10/2014 4:20:48 PM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Sarah Emma Edmonds

Disguised for much of her life as a man, Sarah Emma Edmonds proudly served her adopted country, the United States, as a nurse and spy during the Civil War. After fleeing from Canada to escape her abusive father, Edmonds enlisted in the Union Army as a male nurse named Franklin “Flint” Thompson.

In 1861, she began serving in the hospital unit of the 2nd Michigan Volunteers as Franklin. She didn’t have any problems keeping up her masculine disguise. Her skills in hiding her identity served her well when she enlisted as Franklin as a spy in the Union Army. 

As Franklin the spy, she crossed enemy lines disguised as a black man named Cuff. She also infiltrated Confederate lines as an Irish peddler woman, a mammy, and as a man again to identify southern spy work. In total, Edmonds used her alias, Franklin, to pull off 11 missions. 

When her time as Franklin ended due to a case of malaria, Edmonds headed back to Washington, D.C., to serve as a nurse through the end of the war. After marrying and moving back to Canada, she died in 1898 in her home country. 

Posted: 5/9/2014 3:48:00 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln, former President Abraham Lincoln’s wife, led a controversial life during her time as first lady. Her fierce sarcastic comments, high spending, and alleged mental illness caused turmoil during her time in the White House, but she was also a woman of intelligence and compassion. 

Throughout her time in the White House, she worked as a volunteer nurse in the Union hospitals. She played a major role in keeping soldiers’ spirits high by visiting them and making rounds. 

When the war ended, she backed the establishments of a nursing corps and helped raise money for former slaves. She also helped freed slaves and Union soldiers through the Sanitary Commission and Contraband Relief Association, which were established during Lincoln’s administration, providing them with supplies and medical care. 

Mary died of a stroke in 1882 at the age of 63 at her sister’s home in Springfield, Illinois. 

Posted: 5/8/2014 4:28:55 PM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman was not only a famous American poet, teacher, and journalist, but he was also a volunteer nurse for three years during the Civil War. In 1862, Whitman traveled to Washington, D.C., to tend to his brother, who had been wounded during the war. After witnessing the hurt soldiers in the battlefield hospital where his brother was receiving care, Whitman signed up to be a nurse at the battle zone in Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

He spent his time visiting various Civil War hospitals tending to the sick, listening to soldiers’ stories, and writing letters home for them. By the end of his service, he estimated he visited “more than 100,000 wounded soldiers (both Union and Confederate) during 600 hospital visits.” 

Some of Whitman’s most famous poems are written about his time as a nurse, including “The Wound Dresser,” which describes the act of nursing to the ill and dying:

           I onward go, I stop,

With hinged knees and steady hand to dress wounds,

I am firm with each, the pangs are sharp yet unavoidable,

One turns to me his appealing eyes—poor boy! I never knew you,

Yet I think I could not refuse this moment to die for you, if that would save you (35-39)

Following his death in 1892, Whitman was buried in a tomb he designed in Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, New Jersey.

 

Posted: 5/7/2014 4:31:28 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses who led the way: Clara Barton

To kick off Nurses Week, we are starting with Clara Barton, “one of the most honored women in American history.” Known as the “Angel of the Battlefield,” Barton served as a nurse during the Civil War at the battles of Chantilly, Fairfax Station, Fredericksburg, Harpers Ferry, Antietam, South Mountain, Petersburg , Charleston, and Cold Harbor, often at the front line. Not only did she nurse the wounded, she comforted, cooked, read, wrote letters, and prayed for them. Barton also helped establish a national cemetery and identify the graves of 13,000 men at the Andersonville prison in Georgia.

In 1870, in the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, Barton was introduced to the International Red Cross. Her time with the organization during the war led her to work with Red Cross officials in Switzerland in an effort to establish a charter in America in 1900. Barton left the organization in 1904 to start the National First Aid Association of America, which emphasized basic first aid instruction, emergency preparedness, and the development of first aid kits. She served as its honorary president for five years.

After publishing several books about founding the American Red Cross, Barton died in 1912 at her home in Glen Echo, Maryland. Her service to the profession of nursing is remembered today through the continued work of the organization. 

Posted: 5/6/2014 4:34:24 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


NursingCenter’s “Specialty Sites”

Are you familiar with NursingCenter’s specialty sites? In the past few years, NursingCenter has launched two specialty sites, the Evidence Based Practice Network and the Skin Care Network. Both sites feature targeted, in-depth content and each have their own unique features and products. Let’s take a quick glance to learn more about these sites.

The Skin Care Network

The Skin Care Network was launched in 2011 by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. The goal is to share all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media. 

Take a look at some of our features: 

News
Discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items.

Tools & Resources
Organized by clinical topic, pages feature all dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities and patient education tools.

Society Partners
Learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses.

Skin Care Insider eNewsletter
Sign up for our free monthly eNewsletter that offers you the latest on skin care!

Social Media
Look for The Skin Care Network on Facebook and Twitter.

The Evidence-Based Practice Network

Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network is an online resource powered by LWW and the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), which promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to healthcare professionals. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. 

Here are some network highlights: 

JBI Tools

JOURNAL CLUB*
Here, you gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty, as well as the opportunity to share information and ideas with other professionals.

SUMARI*
This premier review software package helps health professionals conduct systematic reviews of evidence of feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of health intervention.

TAP*
Analyze small qualitative datasets following a three-step process of entering data, categorizing data, and building themes. 

CAN-IMPLEMENT*
Tailor your clinical practice guidelines for local use with this JBI tool. 

JBI Library
Subscribe and gain access to JBI’s vast collection of evidence-based resources. 

JBI Continuing Education
Discover JBI’s continuing education resources, as well as their evidence-based practice series. 

EBP Insider eNewsletter
Sign up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter!

Social Media
Follow The EBP Network on Facebook and Twitter

Posted: 3/19/2014 4:49:19 PM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Evidence-Based Practice


Free Nursing Resources

Take advantage of our vast collection of free nursing resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com. We know how important your work as a nurse is, and we want to reward your efforts with free nursing activities. From nursing journals to continuing education activities to podcasts, we’ve got what you need, and it’s FREE! 

  • Featured Journal
    Every few weeks, NursingCenter.com presents a “Featured Journal” chosen from more than 50 journals available on our site. Every article in the latest issue is offered to you free of charge. 
  • Nurse’s Choice List
    Discover the top 10 recommended nursing articles selected by our nurse editor. These articles are available to read free online for a limited time.
  • CE Activities 
    All of our journals’ continuing education articles are free to read—you only pay when you wish to earn CE credit. 
  • Patient Education Materials
    Keep your patients informed with our free patient education materials. 
  • Future of Nursing 
    In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released the report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, with the goal to assess and transform the nursing profession. Access articles on this topic for free. 
  • Nursing Tips
    Improve your nursing practice with our free nursing tips, including handy mnemonics, definitions, practice pointers, and more. 
  • Nursing News by HealthDay
    Keep up with the latest headlines in nursing news for free.
  • eNewsletters
    As a member of Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com, you can subscribe to any of our free eNewsletters and get the latest articles and CE activities delivered right to your inbox.
  • Skin Care Network Featured Clinical Updates
    On our Skin Care Network, access our free featured clinical updates from our favorite journal content. 
  • Skin Care Network Image and Video Libraries
    View the latest images and videos in clinical dermatology for free. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Network Featured Articles
    Stay informed in evidence-based practice with our free featured articles. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Podcasts
    Our free podcasts include evidence-based practice information from the American Journal of Nursing and our nursing conferences. 

 

 

Posted: 3/10/2014 4:53:51 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Nurses On the Move: Part 2

Welcome back to Nurses On the Move, where we shine a light on impressive nurses who go above and beyond in their profession and who serve as a role model to those around them.

Last week, you were introduced to Anne Dabrow Woods MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC , the Chief Nurse for Wolters Kluwer Health/Medical Research and the publisher of the American Journal of Nursing and the Joanna Briggs Resources and Karen Innocent DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, CMSRN, the Executive Director of Continuing Education for Wolters Kluwer Health and the lead nurse planner of Lippincott’s continuing nursing education provider unit.

This week, discover what these Nurses On the Move see happening for the future of nursing and learn their best piece of advice to new nurses.

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?

Anne: Nursing will be the solution to the healthcare problems around the world. People need education on conditions, diseases, prevention, wellness, and how to optimize their life living with chronic diseases – that’s all nursing. As we switch to a wellness/holistic model of care, nursing will be the profession leading the charge, working hand in hand with the patient and other healthcare professionals to optimize quality, cost-effective care.

Karen: As the health delivery model continues to place an emphasis on health promotion rather than illness, there will be more career opportunities for nurses in primary care, ambulatory care centers, rehabilitation, and home care.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?

Anne: It’s okay not to know everything, you just need to know where to find the answer. Confidence is not about knowing everything; it's about having the wisdom to know when and where to find the answers.

Karen: Find an area you like. Take time in your career to change your setting to find something more comfortable. New nurses need to adjust to the workload and stress level…but they need to know it does improve with their experience. Things won’t be as difficult.

Q: What do you see as a major obstacle/problem in the current nursing environment? 

Anne: As nurses, we don’t speak with one voice and don’t realize the importance of lifelong learning and education to move the profession forward and improve patient care.

Karen: Most nurses are employed by hospitals and have competing priorities. Feeling busy and overwhelmed is a problem. We need time management and prioritization skills.

Q: What do you hope for this Nurses On the Move blog? What types of nurses would you enjoy shining a light on?

Anne: I would like to see nurses that are making a difference in institutions, patient lives, and the community, that aren’t afraid to stretch beyond their comfort zone and really move the bar on healthcare excellence.

Karen: My hopes for the Nurses On the Move blog are to motivate nurses to pursue certifications and/or advanced degrees, to provide encouragement and support to newer nurses, and to highlight the accomplishments of nurses who are doing great things every day.

Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.   

Posted: 2/21/2014 4:57:23 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurses On the Move: Part 1

We are so proud of the diversity of our membership here on NursingCenter.com. The educational background and experience of our members includes everyone from first-year nursing students to nurse practitioners and nurse executives, and every position and role in between. No matter where you are in your career, we know that many of you have gone above and beyond in your practice and modeled exceptional nursing professionalism for your colleagues and your patients. 

We want to hear from you, our members, and share your story (or perhaps you have a certain colleague in mind you’d like to nominate) for our new blog feature, Nurses on the Move. 

To start, we are recognizing the exceptional nurses who work right here at NursingCenter.com. 

Anne Dabrow Woods MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC is the Chief Nurse for Wolters Kluwer Health/Medical Research and the publisher of the American Journal of Nursing and the Joanna Briggs Resources. With more than 30 years of nursing experience, she continues to work as a Nurse Practitioner in critical care, is adjunct faculty, and will earn her Doctorate of Nursing Practice from Texas Christian University this May.

 

 

Karen Innocent DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, CMSRN is the Executive Director of Continuing Education for Wolters Kluwer Health and the lead nurse planner of Lippincott’s continuing nursing education provider unit. She has grown Lippincott into the largest producer of CNE that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. In 2013, Karen led the provider unit to Accreditation with Distinction. Karen earned her Doctorate of Nursing Practice from George Washington University in May 2013.

I sat down with these impressive nurses to learn why they love nursing, what motivates them to succeed, and where they see nursing going in the future. 

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession? 

Anne: Ever since I was a child, I’ve always wanted to help people. When I was 12, my father died of cancer [leukemia]; it changed me. I wanted to be a nurse and make an impact in people’s lives to improve their quality of life and help them achieve better outcomes. Being able to help people in the most difficult times in their lives is a humbling and rewarding experience. 

Karen: Actually, I didn’t. It was chosen for me. My mother was a nurse and so were six of her siblings. My father saw their independence and job security and wanted that for me. I made the conscious choice to be a nurse when I attended a conference as a student. I saw that nursing was an intellectual profession, more so than what I knew beforehand. I saw these nurses who were so educated, so intelligent. I thought, “I would like to be like that.” 

Q: What motivated you to go for your doctorate? 

Anne: Watching the evolution of healthcare, being a practicing Nurse Practitioner, and the Chief Nurse of this company, I needed to get as much knowledge about healthcare, where it's going, and learn how we as individuals and as a profession can make a difference. I know how to look at healthcare from a more global perspective now – I see the big picture.

Karen: I believe in the importance of lifelong learning, regardless of formal education vs. continuing education, or challenging work experiences. It’s important to improve practice and knowledge to improve care. Also, to get from one career level to another, you need more academic education. It is required now. 

Q: What has been your most difficult challenge related to patient care?  

Anne: Since I practice in critical care, the most difficult patient care challenge I face is quality vs. quantity of life. When a patient has decided he is ready to die, but the family is not ready for it; it creates a difficult and challenging position for everyone involved. We need to remember the patient is the captain of the ship and his decision is the one we need to follow. There needs to be more education with patients and families that quantity of life without quality is not acceptable. Everyone deserves to die the way they chose, with dignity and with their loved ones by their side giving support.   

Karen: It’s changing now, but the payer system – how insurance pays for care. Before, insurance companies decided what they paid for regardless of patient outcomes. I had a patient in home care whose insurance paid for a blood glucose meter, but not for the expensive strips. I wrote a letter to the company, explaining why this person needed close monitoring [and without the strips], the patient would have complications, possibly require hospitalization, and cost the company more money. The company changed their mind and started paying for the strips. Now quality and improved outcomes are required. I hope this reduces barriers providing quality care.

In Part 2, discover how these Nurses On the Move envision the future of nursing and learn their best piece of advice to new nurses.

Do you know the perfect candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about special nurses who are doing great things within the profession and within the healthcare industry as a whole. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 2/12/2014 4:59:21 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse On the Move: Scott DeBoer

“Nursing has been a blessing to me and my family that has allowed me to travel the globe and care for the sickest of the sick across the lifespan.” Scott DeBoer RN, MSN, CPEN, CEN, CCRN, CFRN is a nurse leader with more than 20 years of experience. Currently, he serves as a flight nurse for the University of Chicago Hospitals. He is also a founder of Peds-R-Us Medical Education, a seminar company interested in enhancing the care of children. 

DeBoer wrote the Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse Review book, which is now in its third edition, as well a body piercing removal handbook, and a book on emergency care for newborns. He earned his master's degree in critical care nursing from Purdue University in 1996 and spent time there as a clinical nursing instructor. 

As our next Nurse On the Move, DeBoer is eager to promote the nursing profession and offer his views on nursing education, pediatric care, and the future of nursing. 

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A: I grew up thinking I was going to be a pediatrician, however, after several orthopedic injuries in high school and way too much time spent in the ER, I learned to love the nurses and not be so enthralled with the physicians. Nursing has been an absolutely amazing career.

Q: What attracted you to the career of a flight nurse?
A: Very early in my career, the flight team picked up a 3-month old child in status epilepticus from our ER. I was freaking out to say the least, as I’d never given Valium to anyone that small in my life. The flight crew was nothing short of amazing; I knew from that point on that flight/transport nursing was what I wanted to do as a career.

Q: How important is it for nurses to continue their education?
A: I would say education is crucial, especially for nurses just entering the profession. A bachelor's degree is essential. I work with many incredibly skilled paramedics who obtained their associate's degree in nursing from local community colleges, however, they can't get nursing jobs as many hospitals won't even interview without a bachelor's degree.

Q: Why is pediatric emergency care important to you?
A: Simply, I don't really like taking care of big people. If have a choice, I prefer taking care of sick kids – kids are amazing. They tend to get really sick, really fast, which of course can be scary, but, when they get better, they get better really fast as well. They haven't had years of bad habits (Burger King, beer, etc.) to result in their illness or injuries. They're good kids who’ve bad things happen to them. I just try to help them (and their families) get better.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice? 
A: Beyond getting your bachelor's, it's not being afraid to ask questions of experienced nurses on the unit. The idea that there is no stupid question, especially when it applies to patient care, is really true. What you learned in school is a very, very small part of what you learn on the job from everyone from housekeeping and unit secretaries (they are truly invaluable) to the chief of surgery. Everyone has something they are an expert at and most times are willing (and happy) to teach, if asked by those honestly desiring to learn.

Q: What do you see as a major obstacle/problem in the current nursing environment? 
A: The electronic medical record epidemic – they aren’t going anywhere. I know this and have resigned myself to this fact, however, I truly miss the ability to sit on the patient's bed, look them in the eye, and get a quick history. In many facilities, I have to look at a computer screen bolted to the wall while trying to talk to the patient or their family in another part of the room. This is not ideal – the focus needs to be on the patient and their family, not on clicking computer keys. 

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?
A: I envision an ongoing advancement in the roles of advanced practice nurses, especially with continued financial considerations and changes in healthcare reimbursement. On the transport medicine side, more patients will be transported by ambulance versus helicopters, and emergency departments will continue to see more patients, as access to primary care practitioners remains an issue. 

*Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

Posted: 2/25/2015 2:08:39 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


How to Celebrate National Nurses Week 2015

National Nurses Week runs from May 6 through May 12, ending on Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Every year, NursingCenter hosts a variety of celebrations, ranging from discounts on continuing education activities, journal articles, and nursing eBooks, to special giveaways, blog posts, and more. 

This year,  the American Nurses Association has given National Nurses Week the theme, “Ethical Practice, Quality Care,” and we are gearing up to bring you the same great week of celebrations as a special thank you to all of our members. 

Be sure to check our National Nurses Week page each day that week for discounts, activities, and blog posts. 

We will be developing an exciting CE Collection around topics dealing with “Ethical Practice, Quality Care.” 

Don’t forget to register for any of our free nursing newsletters, as we will be gifting a variety of offers to our newsletter members.

As a bonus, there are two Lippincott conferences running during National Nurses Week this year, the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners and the Lippincott Clinical Nursing Conference.  Both nursing conferences are being held in Philadelphia. 

Stay tuned for more information on how to celebrate National Nurses Week with NursingCenter. 

Posted: 4/7/2015 2:30:48 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Fear technology in the workplace...try going back to school!

   In the recent past, mobile computing devices (formerly referred to as personal digital assistants or PDAs), were optional in the workplace and in higher education. Now the fast pace of practicing in health care is affording nurses little time to step away form the bedside to look up references.

   I gave up carrying multiple print references a decade ago when I purchased my first PDA. There were fewer options, but they were adequate at the time. For one thing, the references were all text-based and I had to pay for them myself. It was worth every penny to me as I managed a busy clinical patient load, providing staff education, managing projects, and juggling my personal life. Still there are many nurses who are not using mobile technology to support their nursing practice. 

  I commend nurse leaders and educators who have pioneered the adoption of mobile computing to help keep current information in the nurses' hands. Examples of some universities that provide resources to students include Drexel Univesity College of Nursing and Health Professions which provided iPod Touches to 300 nursing students. At University of Virginia, all students are required to own a mobile computing device, and the library provides support and training on using mobile reference software. At Ohio State University, the BSN and graduate students are not only required to use mobile devices, they are required to install and use specific software. School is a safe and supportive place to learn how to use mobile software, so if you are going back to earn a higher degree, you may want to research the mobile computing resources and support that is available. 

   Numerous references include evidence-based plans of care, drug information, drug calculators, and disease information. Therefore, acquiring the skills in using mobile references will help you to manage your time better, to make better clinical decisions, and to provide safer care. 

Author: 
Karen Innocent, MS, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, CMSRN

Posted: 6/13/2010 10:38:50 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Technology


Nurse On the Move: Lisa Gorski


ALisa-Gorski.jpgfter a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse
leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.

Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career.

BONUS: The current issue of Home Healthcare Now is FREE until August 15th on NursingCenter.

Q:  Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A:
I wanted to be a nurse since I was a young child. When I was 5 or 6 years old, I drew a picture and wrote a story about how I wanted to be a nurse and help people! That desire never waned. In high school, my intense interest in the sciences and a summer of volunteer work in a hospital as a ”candy striper” reinforced my goal to become a nurse. 

Q:  What attracted you to home healthcare?
A:
I knew that I wanted to work with patients on a longer term basis. I had several graduate school colleagues who worked in home healthcare, and at the time, changes in reimbursement led to shorter hospital length of stay and more transitioning to home care. I saw a potential future in home healthcare.  

The challenges and opportunities in this specialty were apparent to me, including working with families, as well as patients, and working with them over longer periods of time to keep them functioning well in their home.  There is a great need for employing effective patient education to help patients manage their own care. While the assessment and intervention skills that I gained in my acute care experience served me, I needed to develop a new body of knowledge. While I could manage blood sugar levels in a critically ill patient, working with home care patients to manage their diabetes was a different challenge that required not only the clinical focus on diabetes, but also a focus on living with a chronic illness. In graduate school, I studied the issues related to living with chronic illnesses. One of the books I read during graduate school still sits on my bookshelf and still provides me with perspective – Chronic Illness and the Quality of Life by Strauss and Glaser (1975).  

Q:  What’s the biggest challenge related to home healthcare and how do you combat it?
A:
One challenge is time management. Home care nurses travel and generally see five to six patients on the same day. Depending on the needs of the patients, there is also a considerable amount of time coordinating care and communicating with other involved healthcare professionals. As any home care nurse will tell you, there is a considerable burden of documentation. And you must be accountable to that patient and family. When you leave the home, you have to think about what happens or could happen when you leave – have you addressed critical issues to ensure that your patient will be safe when you are gone, as there is no one else there until you get back. Think about the patient with a running infusion of a chemotherapy drug. Does the patient understand what to do and who to call if an alarm occurs or if there is an adverse reaction; is the phone number to call for problems readily available?

On the bigger picture side, the pressures of ensuring positive patient outcomes with reimbursement restraints are challenging. An overarching goal of home care is to keep patients safe in their homes. The hospitalization rate for home health is a publically reported outcome, and hospitals are penalized when patients return back to the hospital within 30 days. As a nurse who has worked in home care for 30 years, the level of patient acuity has certainly increased. I believe the challenge for home care nurses is to become less focused on the tasks to be done, such as wound care or other treatments, and more focused on identifying the nursing diagnoses and managing the outcomes. Keeping patients at home requires that the nurse possess exceptional assessment skills, that risk factors for re-hospitalization are identified and mitigated, that ongoing monitoring identifies and reports  early/subtle changes in condition to allow early intervention, and that there is significant attention paid to medication management.

Q:  Why are you passionate about infusion nursing?
A:
I became a home care nurse during the mid-1980s during that period of great growth in the home care industry. Transitioning patients who required infusion therapy from the hospital to home was a growing trend.  

At that time, I managed many patients who required home infusion therapy from simple IV antibiotics to complex parenteral nutrition. My critical care skills combined with my growing experience in home care issues served me well in that area of practice. However, one of the issues that I identified was that exceptional IV therapy skills are not enough in home care. Because patients and families are involved in various aspects of self-care related to the IV infusion, the home care nurse’s skills in patient education are equally important. Patients are often anxious or may have functional limitations that impact the ability to learn and manage, and these must be addressed. My first published article  in Home Healthcare Nurse in 1987 addressed the patient education issue. I later wrote three books on the topic of home infusion therapy and am in the process of writing another.  

Q:  You served as the president of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) from 2007 to 2008. How did that role impact your profession in nursing?
A:
After being involved in the INS for many years in a variety of local chapter and national positions, it was an honor to serve as president for that year. Subsequently, I continued to serve INS as the chairperson for the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice and am currently serving again in that role for the standards that will be published in 2016. There is a rapidly growing research base for infusion therapy by investigators across the world. Working with my amazing infusion therapy colleagues to search and review the literature and to develop evidence-based recommendations and educate the infusion community has contributed to improved patient outcomes and reduction of preventable complications. My INS involvement has led to so many opportunities. I have had the pleasure of doing many presentations across the country and some international presentations. I regularly talk to or have email discussions with nurses, pharmacists, and physicians regarding infusion related issues and practices. I recently had the opportunity to present in Santiago, Chile and Buenos Aires, Argentina and will be doing presentations in China later this summer. Clearly, nurses not only in the U.S., but across the globe, are striving to provide the best practices for their patients. 
 
Q:  The nursing journal, Home Healthcare Now, was previously titled Home Healthcare Nurse. Why did this publication change its name?
A: Home healthcare nurses have always worked collaboratively with other disciplines, including physical, occupational, and speech therapists, social workers, and pharmacists to name a few. The collaborative relationship has always been strong in homecare – this was evident to me from the minute I became a home care nurse. The focus is on interprofessional care, and I think the new title reflects that. 





Q:  For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?
A:
Nurses today have so many opportunities in many different settings. When you leave a position, you want to feel as if you’ve mastered it. Really learn your first job and develop your skills, especially in working with other healthcare providers. Identify where your strengths lie and use them to determine where you want to go. Also, get involved in nursing organizations relevant to your practice. I am also a member of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists and the American Nurses Association, which have provided me with more information and knowledge and more contact with colleagues who share similar interests and challenges. I recently attended the International Home Care Nurses Organization (IHCNO) where I was inspired by reports of research and home care practices in several countries. Involvement in practice beyond our daily organizational work keeps us fresh and motivated!

Q:  Finally, what do you envision for the future of nursing?
A:
It is really bright! There are so many opportunities for nurses in a variety of settings whether clinical or non-clinical. Nurses are shaping healthcare policy and are increasingly involved in politics. Our critical thinking, expertise, and leadership make an incredible impact in patient care. We are healthcare leaders. 

*Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to
ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 
Posted: 8/4/2015 8:10:59 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Is there an app for that?

Technology – seems many people either love it or hate it. I must admit that I am one of the former.  It amazes me that my children won’t ever have to do a paper by solely researching in textbooks or encyclopedias, or dare I even say it – using a typewriter! 

In the critical care unit where I worked, we often trialed new I.V. pumps, thermometers, telemetry monitors, pulse oximeters, and the like. I never minded the required inservices – I looked forward to learning about new machines that would help us provide better care.

These days, technology goes beyond the excitement (!) of tympanic thermometers. Nurses now carry any number of personal digital assistants, or PDAs, and have information literally at their fingertips. Amazing! Getting drug information right at the bedside? Sure. Lab results delivered by text? Why not?

On our Facebook and Twitter pages, we recently posted a QTc calculation “just for fun” and the lack of response really surprised me. Was it too difficult? Were our fans and followers just not into it? Or perhaps nurses don’t have to calculate a QTc anymore because it is done for them – either directly on the telemetry monitor or 12-lead ECG machine, or perhaps the QT and R-R interval can just be plugged into their (insert device of choice here) and Voila! -  the QTc appears.

All of this talk about technology reminds me of a very helpful tip though – Treat the patient, not the machine! I’ll admit I’ve been guilty of running into a room thinking a patient was in ventricular tachycardia only to find him brushing his teeth. How about you?

Also, I’m curious, when is the last time you calculated a QTc?

By Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Posted: 2/2/2010 10:46:21 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Technology


Nurse On the Move: Lauren Everingham

 
IMG_1484.JPGLauren Everingham RN works on the Pediatric Medicine and Pediatric Short Stay units of All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine in St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Everingham is a second-career nurse. She originally studied writing at Muhlenberg College and worked as an editor for a healthcare magazine. Feeling drawn to a more service-oriented job, she earned her master’s degree in teaching English literature from Western Carolina University and briefly taught English in a North Carolina high school. Everingham quickly realized that she would prefer to serve children and families in a different capacity and went on to earn her BSN from the university’s nursing program. She finally found her home as a pediatric nurse.

Now, equipped with her nursing expertise, Everingham just came back from a week-long medical mission to the Dominican Republic with Team Tampa Bay. There, she used her nursing knowledge to help set up medical clinics and provide care to the people who reside in the bateys, which are small villages in the sugar cane fields of La Romana

Through our email interview, we discussed why Everingham decided to pursue nursing, how it has changed her life, and what her medical mission taught her. 

*After our interview, Hurricane Erika resulted in unforeseen tragedy and disaster in the Dominican Republic. To make a donation, please visit the Caribbean Red Cross

Q: After earning an advanced degree in teaching, what made you decide to switch careers to nursing?
A: I quickly became disenfranchised by the state of education in North Carolina—its teachers are some of the lowest paid in the United States, the state government has eliminated the master’s degree supplement, and when I graduated in mid-2010, teaching positions were being cut left and right due to our struggling economy. For me, the best part about teaching was the kids, so I sought out a career that would allow me to help children while also securing my own future. Turns out, the third career’s the charm! Plus, I use my teaching skills every single day as a nurse.

Q: How has becoming a nurse impacted your life? 
A: Being a nurse in a children’s hospital means I am daily reminded to count my blessings. I am sure all nurses feel this way. It is so easy to take your own health and well-being for granted. My job puts me face to face with children and families coping with heartbreaking traumas, difficult chronic illnesses, terminal disease, abuse and neglect. I am more aware of how fortunate I have been, and I am honored to be able to help these families through a difficult time in their lives.

IMG_1359.JPGQ: What made you choose pediatrics as your specialty? 
A: Above, I mentioned some of the dark things I witness as a pediatric nurse. But, I also experience joy at work every day: seeing mermaids roll down the hallway in wheelchairs to visit patients, watching a child hug his new foster parent for the first time, and helping new parents pose for a picture with their tiny baby who they finally get to bring home after three months in the NICU. Every time I walk into the hospital, through the brightly colored hallways, past the pirate ship playground, and into the elevator where a child’s voice announces, “Going up!,” I think how lucky I am to work in pediatrics. I wish adult hospitals were more like children’s hospitals; I think people would heal faster.


Q: Can you describe why your medical mission to the Dominican Republic was important to you? 
A: I have always wanted to participate in a project like this. My life has been full of opportunity and I’ve been fortunate to have access to education and training. The least I can do is use my skills and education to help people who don’t even have access to basic medical care. Plus, I knew it would be a life-changing experience. It’s one thing to be educated about the struggles of people living in poverty around the world; it’s another thing to see it firsthand. I know I gained more from the people in the bateys of La Romana than I could ever offer to them.

FullSizeRender-(5).jpgQ: What was it like working in nursing outside of the U.S.? 
A: We worked with Dominican physicians and we had very limited resources, so needless to say it was a lot different than nursing here. We navigated language barriers and encountered different practices in dosing medications. It was also eye opening. One of the older patients we saw had a blood pressure of 210/110. Here in the states, we would have done a comprehensive workup for this patient. There, we had to give the gentleman some blood pressure medication and briefly educate him, and that was it. Hopefully there will be some follow up with those types of patients, but we will not be there to see that, so it was pretty unsettling.
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Q: What was your favorite part of your trip? 
A: The kids. They were full of joy and so proud of what little they had. At the first batey we visited, child after child took our hands and led us around to show us their fruit trees. Another day, a group of about 15 kids walked us out into the sugar cane fields, cut down some sugar cane, and showed us how to taste it. The sense of community among the batey children was so beautiful to watch. An older child would give a small child medicine or carry him down a hill when the younger child was afraid. They played in large groups of widely varying ages. They walked around the village holding hands. It was inspiring, and I hope to provide my future children with that sense of community. 
 
Q: You worked with other medical and non-medical volunteers. How did your skills as a nurse fit in interprofessionally on your mission? 
A: The team was made up of 10 American nurses and several Dominican doctors and translators. In previous years, non-medical volunteers (often teenagers) have also accompanied Team Tampa Bay and helped hand out supplies and play with the children. As nurses, our role was to take blood pressures and measure blood sugars, fill prescriptions, administer medications, and hand out supplies. We were able to ensure correct dosing of medications and appropriate antibiotic prescriptions, as well as screen patients for potential surgical needs or other in-depth follow up care. We also helped the translators to educate patients about how to take their medications properly.
FullSizeRender.jpgIMG_0104.JPG
 
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Q: What is the biggest issue that you encountered with healthcare in La Romana? 
A: Access to care. The bateys are often in very remote areas, requiring us to ride 30 to 45 minutes or longer on our school bus from the city. The folks living out there do not have cars, and there is no public transportation. So most of the time, there is no way to get to a doctor’s office or a hospital. This is frequently a problem for women in labor—they often give birth in the batey without any midwife, nurse or medical assistance because they simply cannot get to a hospital. It can be a life-threatening situation for both mom and baby.

Q: What will happen to the medical clinics your team set up now that you left the country? 
A: The medical clinics that we set up are temporary—we set them up and take them down all in one day. However, the Good Samaritan Mission is a large organization that is in place year round and hosts more than 60 mission teams throughout the year. Each team visits several bateys and in total the mission reaches approximately 3,000 people in more than 100 bateys each year. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough teams and supplies to reach every batey each month, so many of the people we saw were provided with a 30-day supply of medication but will not have the opportunity to visit another clinic for months. When it comes to cardiac and diabetic medications, for example, it is a really big problem.
 
IMG_0106.JPG
Q: Would you recommend other nurses sign up for a medical mission with Team Tampa Bay, and what are some of the other projects they could get involved in? 
A: I would definitely recommend joining Team Tampa Bay on a medical mission to La Romana. It was an incredible experience. The leaders of our team work hard to organize these trips every year and they are always in need of more volunteers, supplies, and donations. Nurses can also organize their own mission team through Good Samaritan or get involved with some of their other projects, including the clean water, construction, and Sugar Cane Kids programs.


Q: Finally, what do you see for the future of nursing? 
A: As I mentioned above, nurses are uniquely poised to provide solutions for many of the problems we face in our health care system today. Forward-thinking and innovative nurses, whether in bedside care, outpatient, management, or advanced practice, will seize opportunities to lead us toward a more preventative, holistic approach to healthcare.

*Disclaimer: The author of this blog has a personal relationship with the interviewed party. 

Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 
Posted: 9/3/2015 9:10:54 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Never Events and Nursing – Prevention is Key

never.jpgWhen it comes to never events and nursing, “prevention is key,” explains Janet Thomas MS, RN-BC. As our manager of continuing education accreditation and compliance, Thomas recognizes the vital role nurses play against medical errors that should never occur. 

“Never events are costly to the organization you work in and can have a major impact on its reputation,” she says.  In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a non-reimbursement policy for certain medical incidents in an effort to improve patient safety. These occurrences are considered “reasonably preventable,” through the use of evidenced-based principles. When a never event occurs, the event is publicly reported, meaning that the public is made of aware of the preventable, and sometimes fatal, mistake.

As nurses, you are the frontline of defense for your patients. “You really want to learn how to keep these incidents from occurring in the first place,” explains Thomas. Lippincott NursingCenter and CEConnection have created a series of Never Events Collections to help you maximize your patient’s safety and keep these incidents from happening in your workplace.  You will also be able to meet your continuing education needs, as CE is included in these collections.

Never Events: Manifestations of poor glycemic control
8.0 contact hours - $24.99

Never Events: Air embolism
6.7 contact hours - $19.99

Never Events: Foreign objects unintentionally retained after surgery
6.0 contact hours - $19.99

Never Events: Pressure ulcers, stage III & IV
7.2 contact hours - $34.99

Never Events: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)
7.7 contact hours - $19.99

Never Events: DVT & PE associated with knee and hip replacements
8.6 contact hours - $24.99

Never Events: Falls and Trauma
7.0 contact hours - $19.99

Never Events:  Surgical site infections
6.5 contact hours - $19.99

Never Events: Preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI)
6.8 contact hours - $34.95

Never Events: Administration of incompatible blood
6.3 contact hours - $19.99

How have never events affected your care? What steps are you taking to prevent them from happening? Share your story in the comments below.
 
Posted: 9/17/2015 7:52:35 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Patient Safety


First Clinical

It was my sophomore year of college and we were heading into the hospital for the first time. We had been learning about communication and practicing with one another and now it was time to meet a REAL LIVE patient and use our skills. I was so nervous!

I realize now what this first encounter meant to me. I wanted my first official interaction with a patient to be a positive experience. I had already had some doubts about nursing as a career choice and thought that this experience would give me some insight if this path was indeed the right one for me.

Another thing that I realize now, was that I wouldn’t be just talking as a friend, daughter, sister, or student – roles that I was familiar with. This was new territory and this patient would look to me for answers and support. My role as a nurse was beginning and this patient would trust me to say and do the right thing. 

Despite my nerves, I remember wondering (and being a little impatient about) why we weren’t doing real nursing things when we went to the hospital. I know now that communicating with patients is real nursing. Making that human connection is a big part of what makes us different from other disciplines in health care. Think about how you communicate with patients, their family members and caregivers, and other healthcare providers. Think about how others communicate with you? Any differences?

I like to think that since becoming a nurse, I’ve become a better communicator. I try to consistently think before speaking. I work hard to really listen to others rather than thinking about what I’ll say next when someone else is talking to me. When a difficult conversation is taking place, I think back to the communication strategies that I learned during those first years of nursing school. I also try to pay attention to my own nonverbal cues and those of others.

Have your communication skills and strategies changes since becoming a nurse? How so?

Posted: 8/5/2012 2:40:30 PM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Sometimes no words are needed

Sometimes no words are needed 
Just a nod may be all that is necessary 
A look of understanding 
One hand over another 
A friendly smile 
A shrug of the shoulders 
Someone sitting close by 
Not saying anything 
Just being there 
Sometimes that’s all we can do 
Sometimes that’s all that someone needs 
Sometimes that’s all that we need 
Running in circles to find an answer when no answer exists 
Can be frustrating 
We must learn to accept this 
Be there for one another 
Listen 
Feel 
Support 
Care 
Sometimes no words are needed 

Posted: 9/13/2010 8:34:21 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


I've got your back....

What do you really want for Nurses Week?  Is it the pen, the water bottle, the shirt, or food?  Do these things really make you feel appreciated?  While I won't deny I am happy to receive these token gifts; what I really want is for my colleagues to say thank you for having their back.  The last shift I worked was especially busy.  Most of the patients were on ventilators and vasopressors.  Each room seemed to have a more critically ill patient than the last room.  The Emergency Department had several critically ill patients to transfer up to us and the medical/surgical units were backed up with patients, so they couldn't take any transfers.  This scenario is typical for anyone that works in acute care today. 

What made the day a good day, yes that's right I said a ""good day""; was the fact that we all worked together.  When one nurse had a patient in crisis, the other nurses were right there to pick up her other patients or help her handle the crisis.  The day ran like a ""well oiled machine"" because we had each other's backs and we took the time to say ""thank you"" to each other.  Never was the situation out of control, never did chaos reign supreme. 

It doesn't matter whether you're an advanced practice nurse, an RN or an LPN; we're all colleagues working together for one purpose.  So to all my colleagues out there; ""Happy Nurses Week and thank you. I''ve got your back because I know you have mine.

By Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC

Posted: 5/5/2010 8:46:35 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Are you a critical thinker?

Critical thinking is a skill so important for nurses to learn, yet not an easy one to master. Much focus in the literature is on assessing or measuring a student’s or nurse’s critical thinking ability. How, as that student or nurse, can you improve your critical thinking skills?

Scheffer and Rubenfield describe critical thinking in nursing as being comprised of 11 affective components (perseverance, open-mindedness, flexibility, confidence, creativity, inquisitiveness, reflection, intellectual integrity, intuition, contextual, and perspective) and 7 cognitive skills (information seeking, discriminating, analyzing, transforming knowledge, predicting, applying standards, and logical reasoning). Thinking about these components brings to mind the following advice for fine-tuning your own critical thinking:

  • Be assured that critical thinking will come with experience.
  • Be open to new learning situations and seek them out when you are able.
  • Be flexible. Floating to a new unit, changing shifts, or working with a different preceptor might not be all bad!
  • Be confident, but not afraid to admit when there is something you don’t know. Ask questions!
  • Don’t ignore your “inner voice.”  Nursing intuition is a true phenomenon.
  • Learn from your mistakes and those of others.
  • When overwhelmed, take a moment to pause and think through a situation.
  • After a code or any critical event, take some time to think about how the pieces of the puzzle fit together. Was there something else that you could have done or something that you could have done differently?
  • Practice your skills! Your confidence will improve and you’ll be able to recognize problems.
  • Learn your facility’s policies and procedures (and know where to find them!)
  • Talk with other nurses and colleagues from other disciplines. Plan care together and discuss assessments, problems, interventions, and evaluations. Communication is key!
  • Plan ahead and think of potential consequences of your actions. Giving a diuretic? You might want to check your patient’s potassium.

I know there’s more advice to add here - please do so!  Also, Scheffer and Rubenfield’s article was referenced in Nursing Student Stories on Learning How to Think Like a Nurse, a great read (and FREE!) from Nurse Educator.

DiVito-Thomas P. Nursing Student Stories on Learning How to Think Like a Nurse. Nurs Educ. 2005;30(3):133-136.

Scheffer BK, Rubenfield MG. A consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing. J Nurs Educ. 2000;39(8):352-359.

Posted: 8/2/2010 10:41:10 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Nurse On the Move: Annie Lewis O’Connor

nurse on the move annie lewis o'connorNursing “brought out this side of me that I didn’t know I truly had.” Annie Lewis O’Connor PhD, NP-BC, MPH, FAAN never planned on being a nurse. She didn’t even know if she could handle blood. But, after becoming a single mom at a very young age, one social worker gave her the opportunity to experience a new side of herself. O’Connor was able to shadow nurses, and she saw the “human, caring side of what people did when others were sick. I felt it brought out this side of me that I didn’t know I truly had. I think being a new mom brought out this caring side of me as well.”

Today, O’Connor has expanded that side of herself into an influential career. She holds faculty positions at Harvard Medical School and Boston College and received her master’s degree in nursing from Simmons College in Boston, her master’s degree in public health from Boston University, and her PhD from Boston College. She currently serves as the founder and director of the C.A.R.E Clinic (Coordinated Approach to Recovery and Empowerment) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Specializing in forensic nursing, maternal-child care, pediatrics, and women’s health, O’Connor cares for victims of domestic and sexual violence, human trafficking, and gender-based violence. She also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Forensic Nursing, which makes her the perfect Nurse On the Move for Forensic Nurses Week. Read on to discover the vital work O’Connor is doing for these patients and be sure to check our Nursing Deals and Discounts page for ways to celebrate Forensic Nurses Week.

Q: How has nursing changed since you began your career?
A:
Careers are very much about a journey. I believe back in the day when I ended up in nursing school, it was sort of a calling. Today, it’s a great job, profession, and it’s a business. It didn’t feel like a business when I first started out, and that’s not good or bad. What I hope I bring to it is that people never lose sight of the honor and privilege it is to take care of people at the most vulnerable time in their life, and that’s when they are lying in a hospital bed. I get to do this every day with young nurses in the clinic where I work. I love that I am at the stage in my career where I really am feeling that “pay it forward.” I don’t want anyone to feel that nursing is just a good job. It’s much deeper than that, and I try to model that for the next generation of nurses.

Q: You founded C.A.R.E. (Coordinated Approach Recovery & Empowerment), which assists victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking, and gender-related violence. Why is this approach important to you?
A:
Brigham and Women’s Hospital gave me the opportunity to grow and develop this clinic; I couldn’t have done it without the support of that administration. This was done through dialogue and gathering statistics on my concerns around victims of intentional violence. These patients are unique in so many ways. My research, which is published in Journal of Forensic Nursing, shows a lot of these patients who come into the emergency department (ED) just experienced a traumatic event, and they get handed a packet of information they are expected to navigate through. It’s a mess; they don’t know who to call first.

I wanted to create a follow up with these patients through C.A.R.E. that will become a national model. Within 48 hours, a victim, with their consent, will receive a text message from us. We provide phones if they don’t have one. About 98% of the victims we see agree to the follow up, and our numbers around being able to contact patients have gone from 27% up to 91%.

We also do consultations with in-patients. For example, they are admitted for a non-related issue and during their stay disclose violence and trauma. This week alone, I’ve done six in-patient consults. I have two victims of human trafficking who came in for asthma and diabetes, and we are educating the nurses on how to provide trauma informed-care for these other issues they are experiencing.

I would also like to mention that I invited 14 survivors to become my patient advisors and to name our clinic. When suggestions come from the actual survivors, the policies and procedures we develop have much more relevant and significant meaning.

Q: When a patient comes in with suspect injuries, what should nurses keep an eye out for?
A:
People want a domestic violence screening tool, which we’ve had for three decades now. But, this has not transformed well into actual health care. I think we need to have an actual conversation with these patients about their relationships and pay attention. As I’m taking the history, I am looking for the red flags, such as a partner who won’t separate or the young girl who comes in with an older man. You need to educate yourself around what those flags are and then talk to the patient. You don’t want to go in and say off the bat, “Have you been hit, kicked, or punched? Has your partner forced you to have sex when you didn’t want to?” The correct way to ask is after you’ve established a rapport with the patient to say, “What do you like about your partner or your work? What don’t you like about it? Tell me three things you would change if you could.” The next thing you know, they are telling you their whole story. Really recognize that this affects one in four women. People are always surprised by this, but the statistics are pretty solid.

Q: What is the biggest challenge related to caring for these victims and how do you combat it?
A:
The biggest challenge is really when there are mental health issues or substance abuse involved. If you look at homeless women, women with mental health problems or substance abuse, you think of it as an onion. You start peeling that onion back to get to the core, where you find that there’s a lifelong history of exposure to trauma and violence. You may be treating them for this one incident they came into the ED for, but you are really treating their whole history.

Q: Has there been a particular patient whose story has stayed with you?
A:
The real hard one recently was we had a woman whose boyfriend strangled and beat her pretty bad. The neighbors called and the police came and brought her in. He choked her so bad we could see the strangle marks. As we are working her up and getting her ready for discharge, she was calling the boyfriend to come pick her up. She just looked at me and said, “I know you must think I’m crazy. I don’t even know if I love him, but I just don’t want to be alone.” That was a “Wow” moment for me. I told her, “How about we try to work on the loneliness? So, you aren’t alone.” She left and two weeks later he beat the living day lights out of her again. She wound up in a different hospital, but called and asked for us. I was able to get her transferred and care for her and that was it. She finally left him, and now she’s soaring. If we didn’t have this follow up program, she would have walked out of there and never come back.

Q: Why is every nurse a forensic nurse?
A:
When you look at ED nurses, they see themselves as ED nurses. But, when they see an injury, like someone looks like there were whipped with a belt, they don’t see that as forensic science, they see that as the emergency care. I think that forensic nursing is not a term they are familiar with, and the more we define and share what it means, the more nurses will recognize that’s what they are doing. Nurses in all aspects of delivering health care will see that.

Q: Why is Forensic Nurses Week important to you?
A:
We get to recognize our colleagues in forensic nursing and that there’s a body of knowledge and expertise we’ve built. During this week, I also think it’s important for every nurse to reflect on their own practice and see what is in their own job that is forensic nursing. Working with the elderly or children, for example, there’s a lot of forensic nursing that goes on there.

Q: How has serving on the editorial board of the Journal of Forensic Nursing affected your career as a nurse?
A:
It’s been really wonderful. It takes me to a different level, where I can grow and develop. Reading manuscripts, providing feedback, and encouraging others to write has been great. It makes me very proud of our profession, and I’m honored to be on the editiorial board. I know that whatever winds up in print is very good quality. I’m very proud of the high standard we set in this journal. I see this journal as the flagship for forensic nursing.

Q: You are traveling to Haiti in November. What work will you be doing there?
A:
I travel to Haiti frequently, where I have two roles. One is that I work with local Haitian nurse leaders to develop nursing leadership in Haiti along with my organization, EqualHealth.org. We host a conference there and our work is very interdisciplinary. There teams need to work in harmony, so we focus on that. Second, I’ve done research on gender-related violence in Haiti.

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?
A:
Nurses will be allowed to practice in the full extent of their license. I would love to see all nurses continue their education in some way, shape, or form. I also think that nurses need to be at those tables where policies are being made. Nurses can play a vital role in education, practice, research, and policy, and I want nurses to recognize that.

*Do you know an inspiring nurse to be featured for the next Nurse On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com
Posted: 11/9/2015 9:53:48 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Leadership


Cyber Monday Deals for Nurses 2015

cyber monday deals for nursesCyber Monday Deals for nurses are right around the corner! This year, NursingCenter has a number of special offerings for their members to celebrate the hard work you’ve put in so far in 2015. As a leading provider of Lippincott content, including peer-reviewed nursing resources based on the best evidence available, we strive to provide you with discounted ways to stay current in your practice.

From CE, journal articles, eBooks, and more, there’s so much NursingCenter is ready to offer you on Cyber Monday. Make sure to bookmark our Nursing Deals and Discounts page and check back on November 30th for all of our Cyber Monday deals for nurses. BONUS! We are celebrating for a whole week! From November 30th through December 6th, visit our deals page for all of our offerings. Invite your colleagues to join Lippincott NursingCenter now so that they can also benefit from these deals.

As a special addition, we’re compiling a list of other sites offering deals on Cyber Monday. Keep checking the list below this month for new deals as we find them and remember to check back with NursingCenter on the 30th.
  • Amazon (lots of different deals, check back often for their daily promotions)
  • CyberMonday.com (discounts on shoes for nurses)
  • Target  (deals for nurses, including textbooks, fiction books, and reference books)
Posted: 11/16/2015 10:53:17 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Consider Writing an Article for Nutrition Today

write for nutrition todayNutrition is a huge component of health and well-being. Our bodies are amazing machines that need fuel – the correct types in the correct amounts – to function, grow, and heal. My colleagues in dietetics and I have been working for decades to ensure that nutrition is recognized as a vital sign in assessing patient health and well-being and that it is incorporated into providing care, yet we haven't gotten very far. Why? Until recently, the dietetics perspective and the nursing perspective were not collaboratively integrated into day-to-day practice.
 
A goal of our editorial team at Nutrition Today is to encourage registered dieticians and nutritionists (RDNs) and nurses to co-author articles that will integrate clinical perspectives and treatment into the coordinated patient care model. This collaboration can provide effective, interdisciplinary means of resolving care issues, thereby improving patient outcomes.
 
To do this, first I encourage you to get to know our journal: 

•    Nutrition Today is a peer-reviewed journal focused on translating the latest developments in nutrition science and policy to health care providers.
•    Nutrition Today reaches key opinion leaders in the health professions and nutrition sciences.
•    Nutrition Today features authoritative articles on topics such as educating patients on conflicted science around butter, saturated fat, sugars, and meat
•    Continuing education credit is available in each issue. 
•    Our associate editor, Dr. Rebecca Couris, is both a clinical pharmacist and a nutrition scientist. Along with another colleague, she has developed a series in the past year on the management of Type 2 Diabetes and hypoglycemia, with pros and cons of medications and their nutritional implications. 
•    We enlist some of the world’s experts to write authoritative columns on hot-topic and timely items, for example, drinking raw milk, and how to explain the pros and cons to patients.
•    We cover a variety of specialties, such as gerontology, where a strong collaboration between nursing and dietetics professionals is essential. Nurses understand the importance of ensuring smooth transitions from acute care to chronic care, and the importance of avoiding or minimizing readmissions. 

Nutrition Today hopes to launch a series of articles where nursing professionals and RDNs collaborate to share their knowledge with one another and our readers. Examples include: 

•    Caring for older adults whose diseases or treatments have nutritional implications
•    Managing the nutritional needs of certain populations, especially older adults, pregnant patients, and children.
•    Transitioning patients with serious gastrointestinal or neurological problems to home care .
•    Decision-making with regards to tube feeding at the end-of-life.
•    Delivering care to pregnant women and infants at high nutritional risk.
•    Managing interprofessional approaches to care delivery. 
•    Treating individuals with chronic degenerative diseases that have dietary or nutritional implications.

We invite you to work with an RDN from your hospital, home health agency, hospice, clinic or nursing home to co-author a paper on one of the suggestions above or a topic of your choice. Feel free to send me an email at nutritiontoday@cox.net so I can answer your query or help you develop your topic.  

We welcome your comments or suggestions on how to make our journal more helpful to nurses and the readers of our sister publications in nursing. 
 
Bon appetite!
 
Johanna Dwyer, D.Sc,RD
Editor, Nutrition Today
 
More Reading & Resources
How to Write for Our Nursing Journals
 
 
Posted: 11/20/2015 9:29:37 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Education & Career


How to Write for Our Nursing Journals

writing-and-nursing.jpgWriting for a nursing journal is a great way to advance your nursing career, get your voice heard, and share your particular nursing perspective on topics important to you. Lippincott NursingCenter hosts more than 50 nursing journals and we want to hear from you! 

As a digital editor for NursingCenter, I’ve really enjoyed learning more about the nursing profession and sharing my thoughts and ideas with our members. I frequently get asked by nurses how they can share their writing with NursingCenter. Getting published in an established, authoritative, peer-reviewed nursing journal is a great way to get involved.
 
Many of our journals are looking for talented nurses to write for their publication. Some of these journals include:

•    American Journal of Nursing
•    Computers Informatics Nursing
•    Home Healthcare Now
•    Journal of Christian Nursing
•    Journal of Forensic Nursing
•    Journal of Pediatric Surgical Nursing
•    Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association
•    Journal of Trauma Nursing
•    Nursing2016 Critical Care
•    Nursing Research
•    Nutrition Today
(See specific instructions for this journal in our blog, Consider Writing an Article for Nutrition Today)

You can see all of our nursing journals on our Journals page. Follow their Information for Authors instructions, and you will be well on your way to getting published. With our Editorial Manager system, the online submission and electronic peer review process is a breeze. There’s always assistance available for those who need it; most journals have production editors and managing editors who are very helpful. 

As a bonus, I’ve compiled some resources for getting published in a nursing journal from us and around the Web:

•    How to Get an Article Published in a Nursing Journal
•    Tips for Getting Published in a Nursing Journal
•    Author Guidelines: Writing for the American Journal of Nursing
•    Writing in the Digital Age
•    The Editor’s Handbook, 2nd Edition

•    Writing for Nursing Publication

Establish yourself as an expert in the nursing community and spread that nursing knowledge around by writing for our nursing journals.  
 
More Reading & Resources
Consider Writing an Article for Nutrition Today

 
Posted: 1/8/2016 10:34:34 AM by Cara Gavin | with 3 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Nurse On the Move: Donna White

Nurse On the Move Donna WhiteDonna J. White, CRNA, MS is an accomplished nurse anesthetist working and living in Rhode Island. She started her nursing career in the 1980’s with a nursing diploma degree from the Shadyside Hospital school of nursing in Pittsburgh, Pa. After testing her skills in a number of settings, White determined she wanted to challenge herself more, both in her professional and personal life. 

White earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh. She also decided to spend six months hiking the Appalachian Trail with her husband, where she went back to basics and discovered what she really needed to survive in the wild and to thrive in her nursing career. On that trip, she decided to earn her degree as a nurse anesthetist from Southern Connecticut State University, and now, she makes her career work with her active and involved lifestyle as a mom.
 
For January’s Nurse On the Move, White talks about her experiences as a busy nurse and how she makes time for herself in between her family members’ schedules. Learn what her New Year’s resolution is for 2016 and her number one piece of advice for nurses looking for a balance between work and home.

Q: What made you interested in becoming a nurse and what was it like starting out with a nursing diploma degree?
A:  I was 17 when I graduated high school, and I spent a few years fumbling. I was earning college credits, and my mother kept saying, “You should be a nurse.” I did always love the sciences, so finally, I decided to go into nursing because I knew I would always have a job. My motivation was to get a job right away – I needed to work. I was in a hospital-based diploma program, which was excellent. It was a 24-month program that was year-round. At that time when I got my first job, I was better prepared than the baccalaureate nurses to care for patients. In the 80’s, BSNs went through a period where they were very book oriented and you could tell the difference between us, but I believe that has changed. 

Q: Why did you decide to go back to school and earn your bachelor’s degree and eventual master’s degree to become a nurse anesthetist?
A: As I was working, I found myself moving around a lot. I think it was because I needed more of a challenge. Changing setting brought a challenge, but after six to nine months, I was already getting bored. I knew that the only way I was going to advance was to continue my education. I preferred clinical care rather than management, so I knew I wanted to work with patients and not manage other nurses.

Q: You’ve held a number of different roles, such as staff nurse, advice nurse, home care nurse, and emergency nurse. Which setting did you enjoy working in the most and why?
A: As part of being a staff nurse, I worked in the ICU. Definitely, working in the ICU or in my position now as a nurse anesthetist in the OR I’ve enjoyed the most. You have more independence and make more critical decisions in a collaborative way. As an anesthetist, it gives me satisfaction to have the patient feel better by easing their pain.

Q: You’ve also accomplished many things in your person life. In 1990, you hiked the Appalachian Trail for six months with your husband. What was that experience like and did your skills as a nurse come in handy?
A: The experience was phenomenal. I’m not an extreme sports person, but I’ve always enjoyed being outside and hiking. What hit home the most about being out there is it came down to what you need in life to survive. The basic necessities for survival are water, shelter, and food. Being a nurse, I took hygiene seriously. We filtered all of our water; we never drank directly from a stream. We were very healthy. I had been a nurse for about six years at the time and while on that trip, I thought about going to anesthesia school. I worked with my husband on how we could make this work.
 
Q: You now also hold the role of a busy wife and mother. For other nurses trying to find a balance between work and their home life, what would be your number one piece of advice?
A: You need to take care of yourself so you can take care of others. For me, sleeping well and exercising every day for at least an hour keeps me sane. If you’re not well, nobody is well. 

Q: Nurses are caregivers and many often put the needs of others before their own. With your busy schedule, how do you factor in time for yourself?
A: The main thing is whenever you find a gap in your day, use it wisely.  Do not wait until you feel like exercising or the day will be done as you fulfill other priorities.

Q: How has nursing changed since you began your career? Do you find the expectations and technologies of today help you or hinder you when trying to manage your time?
A: Technology has definitely helped in the care of the patients in terms of diagnosing and the speed of treatment. Today, the expectations related to payment, reimbursement, and the expectations from management and the hospital to turn over things quickly can leave room for error at times. They may say you have 15 minutes to turn over, but they want it in five minutes. Patients are still people and they are not going to behave the way the statistics say they should every time. Mistakes happen because of the pressure to produce. 

Q: You currently work part-time as a nurse anesthetist at Guardian Brockton PC, Good Samaritan Medical Center, where you are scheduled for a 24-hour shift every Friday. What is the most challenging part of this job and how do you work through it?
A: I’ve always been a worker bee. If I can go in and continue to work throughout the shift, that’s fine. The challenge becomes when the cases are done, your mind tells you to relax and then suddenly another emergency requires you to be focused and do your best for the patient.

Q: Do you have any New Year’s resolutions for 2016?
A: I would like to start working more this year. The trick is finding the day that I can do that without affecting my girls. I really enjoy my part-time schedule, and being home in the mornings and the afternoons with them. I do hope to work more as my kids get older. I feel very fortunate for my schedule now.

 
Posted: 1/21/2016 8:00:35 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


The National Conference for Nurse Practitioners 2016: What NPs Need to Know

NCNP2016-early-reg.pngThe National Conference for Nurse Practitioners (NCNP) 2016 is being held at Disney's Coronado Springs Resort from May 11th through May 14th. I spoke with the conference chairperson, Margaret Fitzgerald, 
DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC on what makes this year’s conference so exciting, what attendees can expect, and what special highlights are planned. 

Be sure to take advantage of early registration through March 31st! Enter discount ID “SPECIAL” for $50 off the main conference. For other nursing conferences and events, check out our Nursing Events Calendar
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Q: How did you first get involved in the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners (NCNP)?
A: Originally, I was one of the often invited faculty at NCNP. I greatly enjoyed speaking at this high quality meeting that presented a variety of truly cutting edge presentations to nurse practitioners. Because of my work speaking at the meeting and the favorable feedback I would receive, I was invited to be part of the planning committee. After serving on that committee for a few years, I was invited to take the helm as the chair of the committee, which has been a real honor and privilege to do. 

Q: What is so special about NCNP?
A: The highlights of NCNP are information building, skill building, and clinical decision making sessions for nurse practitioners. 

Attendees will find an update of some of the most important topics in primary care, including the latest information on Hypertension, Menopause Management, Diabetes, and the like. 

NCNP has a wide variety of skill-building presentations from which to choose. Most sessions will have four to six choices of topics, like conducting an orthopedic exam, splinting, casting, reading an electrocardiogram, or improving your prescribing skills. 

Another great thing about this conference is that we also have session offerings for clinicians that are more specialized in their practice. We do a good deal of urgent, emergency and acute  care sessions as well, including electrolyte management, pain management, intracerebral hemorrhage, mechanical ventilation, managing respiratory failure, and more.
 
What it gets down to is this… at the meeting we help meet the needs of a wide variety of nurse practitioners. They can cut across different areas of concentration and explore a variety of different topics all in one location.

As a bonus, one of the true value-added parts of this meeting is that their breakfast and lunch are included in your tuition. This allows the nurse practitioner to have time to socialize and network with people from all over the country.
 
Q: How will this year’s conference surpass past years?
A: The location is simply superb. This year, NCNP is being held at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. This is a beautiful facility with lots to do on premises, plus of course all that Orlando and Disney have to offer right outside the door. The way the meeting area is set up is really conducive to socializing with one another. The topic content is also top notch. The planning committee has really worked to put together an exciting program to help move the nurse practitioner along in the profession.

Q: For the keynote address, I see you are interviewing Loretta C. Ford, RN, PNP, EdD, FAAN, FAANP. What can attendees expect?
A: More than  50 years ago, Loretta Ford helped create the concept of the nurse practitioner profession. She is 95-years-old, and we are incredibly fortunate to have someone who started the profession around today to educate all the 210,000 plus nurse practitioners out there. She has become a dear friend and mentor to me over the years, and my interview with her at NCNP will be a little different than talks she has done in the past. I’m going to interview her to get up close and personal. I want to know what she was thinking when she first conceived the profession; I want to know who her mentors were at the time. She was born the same year women in this country received the constitutional right to vote. I want to know how that time period influenced her decisions. 

Q: NCNP is a great way to earn CE and pharmacology credit. Why is earning pharmacology credit important for attendees?
A: Pharmacology credit is very important. As nurse practitioners, we want the latest information about a variety of medications, including new ones to market and repurposes of older medications. As prescribers, continuing education in pharmacology is a necessity; virtually all NPs have a pharmacology requirement to maintain their licenses.  

Q: You will be speaking on emerging infectious disease threats, including dengue fever, the avian flu, chikungunya, and enterovirus D65. Can you tell me some highlights about this talk?
A: I greatly enjoy doing this presentation. Historically, infectious diseases have mostly been spread outside of the United States. But, the growing rate of international travel is changing this. We need to be able to recognize these diseases and treat patients accordingly. I have a number of patients who travel to and from the Caribbean, and I need to be aware of these issues. For this talk, I will also be including the latest information around Zika virus as we learn more about this frightening disease.
 
Q: NCNP will also host a number of exhibit hours, where nurses can learn more about new products, trends in the industry, and information sources such as Lippincott NursingCenter.com. Why should your attendees take a stroll through the exhibit hall?
A: Strolling through the exhibit hall is a great way to learn new information around a variety of nursing products, from educational websites to new pharmaceuticals and nutritional supplements. Your eyes will be open to resources of which you were previously unaware. 

Q: Finally, what is your favorite part about attending a conference? 
A: My favorite part is knowledge building; we have so much to learn in this profession. I also enjoy meeting nurse practitioners from all over the country and all over the world. 
 
Posted: 2/3/2016 8:19:15 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Nurse On the Move: Carolyn Ackerman (podcast)

nurse-on-the-move-carolyn-ackerman.jpgCarolyn Ackerman Ed.D MS RN CHPN, is from Arvada, Colo., and has almost 40 years of experience in home health and hospice. She actually discovered our Nurse On the Move feature in a recent Home Healthcare Now journal article, Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski, and thought to herself, “Well…why not [me]?” 

I had the opportunity to speak to her over the phone to discover why she thought she would make a good candidate, and I am so glad she reached out to us at NursingCenter. Not only is Ackerman a registered nurse, but she is also an assistant professor at Regis University in Denver, and she is very involved in end-of-life interdisciplinary simulation. 

Ackerman recently graduated from Creighton University with her Ed.D in interdisciplinary education. She created an end-of-life board game called The Path of Life: The Journey of Living at the End-of-Life © game, where participants assume the role of the patient as they make decisions related to their terminal disease. 

Listen for the whole interview…
Podcast-(1).jpg

For inquiries around Ackerman’s board game and other work, email cackerman@regis.edu.

*Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

 
Posted: 3/9/2016 7:51:01 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership


Nurse Who Moved: Margretta "Gretta" Madden Styles

NursingCenter is celebrating Certified Nurses Day, which happens every year on March 19th. Why March 19th? It happens to be the birthday of the pioneer and inspiration behind nurse certification, Margretta "Gretta" Madden Styles, RN, EdD, FAAN.

While we would have been beyond thrilled and honored to interview this innovator in the nursing profession, sadly, Styles passed in 2005 after a long, successful life and career. We thought we would adjust our ‘Nurse on the Move’ blog to feature one of the top ‘Nurses Who Moved’ and truly shaped the profession.
 
Life and Education 

Styles was born in Pennsylvania in 1930. She was married to her husband for 47 years, Reverend Douglas Styles, and the couple had three children.

Styles attended Juanita College and earned undergraduate degrees in biology and chemistry. She went on to Yale University to earn her master’s degree in nursing and then on to the University of Florida, where she earned her doctorate in education.

Nurse educator, author, and innovator

Styles started teaching as an associate professor in 1967 at Duke University and then moved on to become the dean of nursing at various universities, including University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Wayne State University in Detroit, and the University of California, San Francisco. 

Styles campaigned and advocated for stricter certification requirements and credentialing standards for nurses. She wrote at great length on this topic and later helped to create the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). Her influence on refining the nursing profession in the U.S., extended internationally, and, for a time, Styles also served as president of the Internal Council of Nurses.

While her legacy will always be tied to her role in the creation of the ANCC, her impact on the nursing profession is still widely prevalent. She is often quoted and referenced in medical publications and has had many awards and grants named in her honor. Styles was also inducted into the American Nurses Association hall of fame.  

And, of course, the profession will continue to honor Styles’ work and accomplishments on her birthday every March 19th for Certified Nurses Day.
 
Happy Birthday, Gretta and Happy Certified Nurses Day! Be sure to check our Certified Nurses Day page on March 19th for lots of great resources and deals to honor this special day.

By Kim Fryling-Resare

References:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margretta_Styles
http://www.nursecredentialing.org/Certification/Certified-Nurses-Day/Overview/Meet-Greta-Styles
Posted: 3/14/2016 8:07:11 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Leadership


My time at the 2016 NSNA Annual Convention

nsna-annual-convention.jpgThis March, I traveled to the 2016 NSNA Annual Convention at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando from March 30 – April 3. This was the first time NursingCenter attended this event, and I was really looking forward to all that the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) had in store.
 
On the first day of the exhibit hall opening, I could see a line of eager and excited nursing students around the convention center hall. With over 3,000 students in attendance, I knew this was going to be an exhilarating day. 

As the doors to the hall opened, a flood of nurses entered the room and started making their way to the different booths. The NursingCenter team was ready with tons of free nursing tip cards, black notebooks, pens, and flyers. Wolters Kluwer also hosted interactive events, including video interviews and their very own WKNurseEd Instagram fun cutout. 

I loved getting to know the nursing students and discover how they use our site and our other Wolters Kluwer products, like Lippincott CoursePoint, PrepU, and our LWW nursing textbooks

nsna-booth-(4).jpg             5_Y927_NC_nursing_tips_ONLINE_pdf_126396_Page_01.jpg             snan-intagram.jpg

disney.jpgAfter the exhibit hall closed, I was able to enjoy the Coronado resort, which hosts a 22-acre lake (and even small alligators!), a giant pool with a 50-foot replica of a Mayan temple, and a number of hammocks to kick back in after a long day. I can’t wait to be back at this resort when I attend the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners in May!

Are you attending any nursing conferences this year? Check out our Nursing Events Calendar for an entire conference listing. Don't forget about NursingCenter's Tips & Timesavers for Conference Attendees!

 
More Reading & Resources
Nursing Events Calendar
Nursing2016 Symposium and NCNP: Conference Highlights


 
Posted: 4/8/2016 8:25:40 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Advance your Nursing Career with Wolters Kluwer

wk-logo.bmpAre you looking to advance your nursing career by either writing for a nursing journal or reviewing the work of other nurses? Medical publishing is a vast and growing industry, and we need experienced nurses who are looking to advance their own career and the nursing profession as a whole by creating content and evaluating the content of others. 

Right now, Wolters Kluwer is seeking freelance clinical editors for Lippincott Procedures and Lippincott Advisor. Lippincott Procedures hosts over 1,600 evidence-based procedures used by nurses and other health care personnel caring for patients in acute, long-term, and ambulatory care settings worldwide. Lippincott Advisor houses a variety of entries in categories, such diseases, signs and symptoms, diagnostic tests, healthcare acquired conditions, sentinel events, and more. We need clinical editors to ensure that assigned product entries are current, accurate, and evidence based. Learn more about this opportunity and the application process. 

Wolters Kluwer also publishes over 50 Lippincott nursing journals seeking credible nurses to submit journal articles to be published. These journals, including American Journal of Nursing, Computers Informatics Nursing, and  Nursing2016 Critical Care, are interested in hearing from you and learning more about your ideas for upcoming journal issues. Read more about How to Write for Our Nursing Journals

 
Posted: 4/11/2016 2:24:53 PM by Cara Gavin | with 3 comments

Categories: Education & Career


Nursing Informatics Day: Celebrate with NursingCenter and CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing

mollie-cummins.jpg“The most important thing for nurses to understand about informatics is that it’s not technology. Informatics is not about hard drives, and it’s not even necessarily about programming, and we certainly cannot fix someone’s problems with Outlook. Informatics is about how we’re managing data, information from both a process perspective and a technical perspective to advance health care.” Mollie R. Cummins, PhD, RN, FAAN has been a practicing nurse since 1994 and has made waves in the nursing informatics specialty throughout her career. She holds a doctorate in nursing science and information science from Indiana University, serves as an associate professor of nursing and adjunct professor of biomedical informatics at the University of Utah, and currently serves as the president of the Utah Nursing Informatics Network. Cummins also recently served as editor the ANI Connection and CIN Plus columns of the journal, CIN: Computers, Informatics, and Nursing.

CIN.pngNursing Informatics Day is May 12th and takes place during National Nurses Week. She says, “It’s important that nursing informatics celebrate its profession in conjunction with nurses week, especially this year because this year the focus is on safety. IT has been identified as one of the most promising approaches for improving safety in the clinical setting. IT-based strategies, such as barcode medication administration, can really reduce safety inefficiencies and vulnerability in the clinical setting, so it’s very important that nursing informatics be a part of this.” 




I had the chance to speak with Cummins over the phone about ways to celebrate Nursing Informatics Day and why nurses in all specialties should pay attention to technology in the workplace. 

Listen for the whole interview…
Podcast-(1).jpg
   
Be sure to stop by our National Nurses Week page for more ways to celebrate, including discounts and giveaways for nurses week! BONUS: Read the current issue of CIN on NursingCenter for free as our featured journal until May 15th. 
 
More Resources
CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing
CE Collection: Nursing Informatics
CE for Informatics specialty
Nursing Informatics




 
Posted: 5/2/2016 2:49:50 PM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Technology


Wolters Kluwer nursing journals sweep ASHPE awards

ashpe-award_2016.jpgIn 2016, Wolters Kluwer’s nursing journals won 24 times in the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE) awards! Our winners were in the Editorial, Graphic and Online categories, and we are especially excited that Lippincott NursingCenter.com won gold for Best Use of Social Media for National Nurses Week 2015.  

The award-winning nursing journals from Wolters Kluwer are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you! For the full list of award-winners, visit ASHPE’s website

Publication of the Year: Emergency Medicine News

GOLD
Best Feature Article: American Journal of Nursing (Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report)
Best Legislative/Government Article: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (Learning From New York City)
Best Use of Social Media: Lippincott NursingCenter.com
Best Cover Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (After the Trenches: Spiritual Care of Veterans)
Best Peer Reviewed Journal: American Journal of Nursing

SILVER
Best Feature Article Series: Nursing2016 (Pregnancy in Crisis)
Best New Department: Nursing Management (Care Transitions)
Best Feature Article: Nursing made Incredibly Easy! (The truth about human trafficking)
Best Profile: Neurology Now (A leader takes on brain disease)
Best Peer-Reviewed Journal: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Best Special Supplement, Annual or Buyer’s Guide: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Soft-Tissue Fillers and Neuromodulators: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives

BRONZE
Best News Coverage: Neurology Today (AAN's Call for Repeal of MOC Part IV Awaits Action from Credentialing Board)
Best Regular Department: Neurology Now (For the Caregiver)
Best Commentary: The Hearing Journal (Do or die for hearing aid industry
Best Legislative/Government Article: The Nurse Practitioner (27th Annual Legislative Update: Advancements continue for APRN practice)
Best Blog: American Journal of Nursing (Off the charts)
Best Cover Photo: American Journal of Nursing (Faces of Caring: Nurses at Work)
Best Feature Article: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Original Research: CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing (Social Media: The Key to Health Information Access for 18- to 30-Year-Old College Students)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Computer-Generated: Journal of Christian Nursing (Nursing for the Kingdom of God)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing (Womb Outsourcing: Commercial Surrogacy in India)
Best Website/Online Presence of a Publication: PRS Global Open

 
Posted: 5/17/2016 8:28:55 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Video]

Nursing is a fluid and dynamic profession that is constantly changing for the better. In 2016, there are six key trends happening in nursing around the world that every nurse needs to know.

In the video below, Wolters Kluwer, Health, Learning, Research and Practice Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC presents these trends and offers three learning objectives:

Learning Objectives
•    Identify the factors that are influencing nursing and health care
•    Identify macro trends in nursing from a U.S. and global level
•    Identify ways to meet the changing paradigms of health care on a national and international level

The six key trends that are happing in nursing around the globe in 2016 include:

Macro Trends in Nursing 2016
•    Learning from nursing’s past
•    Global growth in nursing
•    Life-long learning
•    A changing nursing workforce
•    Evidenced-based practice
•    Using technology to improve global health

Watch the video below and be on the lookout for specially-created infographics around each macro trend in nursing coming soon to our blog! 

 
Posted: 5/24/2016 8:36:23 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Learning from Nursing’s Past: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

Wolters Kluwer Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC surveyed the six key trends that are driving the nursing profession around the globe in 2016. The first macro trend in nursing this year is “Learning from Nursing’s Past.” From Florence Nightingale’s time to present day, nurses have shaped their professional skills around what works and what doesn’t. With a high emphasis on evidenced-based practice, learning from the past couldn’t be more applicable today. 

                                          learn-from-nursing-s-past-inforgraphic.jpg

Use this Learning from Nursing’s Past infographic to promote this trend in the profession and be on the lookout for the next five trends! 

To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi "><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/37d222c3-9129-4194-9966-d8f8dda0d1b0/learn-from-nursing-s-past-inforgraphic.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi"> Learn from Nursing’s Past </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>


 
Posted: 5/26/2016 9:22:56 AM by Cara Gavin | with 4 comments

Categories: Inspiration


The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and Lippincott NursingCenter – what a pair!


joanna-briggs-institute.jpgIf you haven’t noticed already, Lippincott NursingCenter hosts a wide variety of content from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). JBI is a leading international research and development organization based within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. It promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to health care professionals to support clinical decision-making. As a leading provider of nursing resources based on the best evidence available, it only makes sense that NursingCenter would partner with JBI to provide the most up-to-date and authoritative nursing content. 

jbi-database-of-systematic-reviews-and-implementation-reports.jpegMost recently, Wolters Kluwer became the publisher of the 
JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and 
Implementation Reports (JBISRIR)
, an online journal that publishes systematic 
review protocols and systematic reviews of health care research on a monthly basis. I’m actually the digital editor for this journal, and I am proud to say the editorial team behind this content is incredibly dedicated to providing reports that are based on JBI methodology and present the findings of projects that seek to implement the best available evidence into practice. You can find JBISRIR on NursingCenter. For all of the past issues and information for authors, please visit the journal website

There’s also a new JBI CE course hosted on NursingCenter, the Experiences of Heart Failure Patients Following Their Participation in Self-Management Patient Education. Learn how to recognize the components of a self-management education program for patients with heart failure and earn one contact hour. In fact, there’s over 50 JBI CE courses hosted on NursingCenter, including JBI Best Practice, JBI Long Courses, and JBI Evidenced-Based Practice Series

If that isn’t enough, NursingCenter also hosts the JBI tools on our Evidenced-Based Practice Network. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. The JBI tools include JOURNAL CLUB*, where you can gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty; SUMARI* a premier review software package helping health professionals conduct systematic reviews, TAP*; which allows you to analyze small qualitative datasets; and CAN-IMPLEMENT*, which tailors your clinical practice guidelines for local use.

NursingCenter is your one-stop shop for all things JBI. Be sure to check back regularly for new JBI content. 

More Reading & Resources
Evidenced-Based Practice Network
JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
JBI Continuing Education

 
Posted: 6/13/2016 10:49:54 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationEvidence-Based Practice


Global Growth in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

It’s time for the second key macro trend driving the nursing profession in 2016 – “Global Growth in Nursing.” There are over 21.6 million nurses in the world and this number continues to rise, with most nurses residing in Europe and the Western Pacific. As the profession continues to grow globally, a number of challenges are presented both for nurses around the world and for nurses at home.

Use these Global Growth in Nursing infographics to understand how this macro trend affects you and your international partners. 

                                          global-growth-in-nursing.jpg

                                          2.jpg

Bookmark our blog and be sure to watch out for the next four trends! Our Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC gave a presentation on the upcoming six key trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel.

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/1-(1).jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

Add this second infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/2.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

 

Posted: 7/6/2016 10:11:19 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


World Suicide Prevention Day

world-suicide-prevention-day.pngSeptember 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day, hosted by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP). According to IASP, “the World Health Organization estimates that over 800,000 people die by suicide each year – that’s one person every 40 seconds. Up to 25 times as many again make a suicide attempt.”

As nurses, you face these statistics every day and do your best to decrease these overwhelming numbers. Whether its screening suicide risks in teens, patients with traumatic brain injuries, elderly patients, or cancer patients, you consider the dangers and assess the situations. 

But, what about assessing yourself and your colleagues for these same risks? As health care providers, nurses face stressful days and nights, confront poor patient outcomes, and combat the negative feelings they face to push through and carry on with the work at hand. At times, you may feel you are so busy caring for others that you forget to take a moment and to consider what’s going on inside yourself. 

On NurseTogether.com, there is a sobering blog, Are Your Nursing Colleagues Suffering from Depression?, that outlines some of the signs that indicate clinical depression and suicidal thoughts in nurses. According to the blog, “A study by Welsh found that 35% of a sample of medical surgical nurses had clinical depression. Another study from HealthLeaders Media revealed that one out of five nurses is depressed.” Nurses tend to have larger workloads than other professions, which can lead to both mental and physical stress. “Nurses perform 160 tasks in an eight hour shift with no task lasting longer than 2:45 seconds….Musculo-skeletal disorders are reported in more than 60% of the nursing workforce.” In the Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice article, Depression in Hospital-Employed Nurses, “Direct healthcare workers, including nurses, may be more vulnerable to depression as research has shown that work stress precipitates depression in working women and men. Indeed, healthcare workers were ranked third for depressive episodes of all occupations between 2004 and 2006.” Stress on the mind and the body are factors to consider when thinking about clinical depression. 

According to Nightingalechronicles.com, another reason nurses may be more prone to depression and suicidal thoughts than other professions is that when a nurse makes a mistake, it may result in the loss of a patient. “The pressure to ‘Do no harm’ sits heavy on the shoulders of all who take that oath. But what comes after ‘if harm is done’? How do we counsel the person who may have made the mistake?”  Nightingalechronicles.com urges, “When a nurse or medical professional makes a mistake, immediate counseling and crisis intervention should be provided. Nurses should not have to bury themselves in grief, fear, and shame.” 

Other ways to support nurses in trying times are to connect, communicate, and care. IASP promotes these three actions as tools to support those who have encountered suicidal thoughts. You can connect by keeping an eye on yourself and your colleagues and by checking on how they are feeling. If a colleague or yourself is experiencing suicidal thoughts, communication is key. Nurses need to feel it is safe to discuss this topic without fear of being judged or reprimanded. Fellow nurses, policy makers, and managers then need to “care enough about suicide prevention to make it a priority.” Suicidal thoughts should not be swept under the rug or treated as something that can be dealt with later. The risks for nurses are just as real as the risks for the patients they are taking care of.
Posted: 9/8/2016 11:20:37 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Nurse On the Move: Ann Marie Marks

nurse-on-the-move-ann-marie-marksIn honor of National Case Management Week, which takes place October 9th – 15th, we are featuring a stellar Nurse On the Move, Ann Marie Marks RN, BSN, CCM. Marks has over 36 years of nursing experience. She started in the critical care field and eventually segued into case management at a time when this field was being developed.

Marks helped pave the way for the role of the case manager, including creating content for the first Certified Case Manager (CCM) exam in 1990. She’s helped define what case management entails and continues to serve as an advocate for patients by coordinating care across a large, interdisciplinary health care system.

Today, she serves as an RN case manager consultant and speaker; she presents at the Thomas Jefferson College of Health Population Health Academy, and was the #1 ranked speaker at NAHQ’s 2016 National Quality Summit. She recently served as the Director of Care Coordination at the Delaware Valley Accountable Care Organization where she continues to consult on post-acute services.  She was previously Director of Commercial Case Management for Humana, Inc., in Louisville, Ky., and as the National Director of Integrated Care Management for Aetna’s Medicaid division. In 1999, Marks was appointed by the governor of Kentucky to serve as Deputy Secretary of Health, with oversight of Commonwealth’s Primary Care Case Management Program (KenPAC), and programs within the Department of Medicaid Services, CCSHCN, and Office of Aging.

I was fortunate enough to sit down with Marks in our Philadelphia office to discuss what case management is, what it was, and how it’s evolved, including why it’s so important in today’s world of health care.

Read on to discover the vital role that case managers play and for more case management news:
  • Subscribe to Professional Case Management , the Official journal of the Case Management Society of America (CMSA).  Marks is a CMSA member and a long-time subscriber to the journal and says, “Over the years, this journal has been the source for evidenced-based studies and peer-reviewed literature for case management. It’s the most often cited and is often a source of reading materials for classes on case management. For me, this journal is one of my go-to spots when I’m attesting to the value of case management or saying a program hasn’t proved valuable.”
 
Professional Case Management

  • Check out these books on case management from Wolters Kluwer.
 CMSA Core Curriculum for Case Management, COLLABORATE® for Professional Case Management, Case Management

CMSA Core Curriculum for Case ManagementCOLLABORATE(R) for Professional Case ManagementCase Management












The interview:

Q: You’ve been a registered nurse for nearly 40 years and specialized in critical care. What made you decide to become a nurse?
A:
When I was 15 my father was in a horrible auto accident. He was taken to a larger city hospital about 70 miles from our small town.  His jaw was wired and he had a chest tube, a feeding tube, and many injuries.  He could not be left alone, and my mother needed to return to her position as a teacher.  Somehow I was nominated to “stay” with him. I slept on a cot in his room and within a day the nurses and doctors started teaching me to care for him. I learned so well that they allowed me to take him home three weeks earlier than anticipated! Three years later, I was awarded a college scholarship to a college that had a Bachelor's in Nursing and knew I wanted that. But having the experience of living in a hospital for eight weeks and caring for a complex patient, my dad, certainly influenced my choice to be a nurse. It was the confidence those nurses instilled in a teenage girl.

Q: How did you enter into the case management field?
A:
It seemed like years before what I did was called case management. When I entered in the early 1980’s, we were referred to as rehabilitation nurses.  It was my encounter of a “rehab nurse” when I was working in ICU that inspired me to explore the field. A nurse arrived in our hospital to discuss a patient who had been in a catastrophic industrial accident. She was very business-like and wore a suit! I found it intriguing that she was a nurse, not providing direct medical care (treatments, medications, etc.,) but was coordinating the care. I came to learn that she was working for a company that provided services to large self-insured employers and insurance carriers. Eventually, I was able to get my foot in the door there. The president, Mary Gambosh, hired me part-time, and challenged me with expanding her business in Kentucky.

But more importantly she trained me about the principles of good case management, and shared everything she knew. Mary assigned me to a large account in the coal fields of eastern Kentucky. That was the beginning of a great career in case management and the expansion of nursing for me and a mentorship under one of the legends in this field, Mary Gambosh, RN.

Q: Can you define what a case manager is and speak to why the name, “case manager,” has changed over time from patient navigators to care coordinators, etc.?
A:
I think the word “case” was always there because the insurance companies would “refer you a case;” I first started to hear the term “case manager” in various states’ Departments of Insurance.  As long as I have known about case management, I have associated it with advocacy, care coordination, and resource management. Even when I entered the field as a ‘rehab nurse,’ I knew that the profession of case manager was evolving, and there was a need to distinguish the education and experience of the professional who did this work. In the late 1980’s, talk started to ensue among the rehabilitation nurses, the certifying agencies, and other professions with great debate about who would qualify to sit for an exam to be a ‘case manager.’ Simultaneously to this, we started to see case manager roles expand inside the hospitals, among payers, and self-insured employers themselves. Components of utilization management, hospital bill auditing, and care coordination became requests of those in this field.  I have seen the new titles of care coordinators and navigators, and I am pleased when I see the job descriptions that often state, “CCM preferred.” The certification attests that you meet a certain competency and experience level to sit for the exam. We do help patients and families navigate complex systems. We do coordinate care. Case management is about making things happen!

Q: How are case managers patient advocates? What is vital about this role in the health care system?
A:
In addition to their clinical experience, the case managers have training in the benefit systems and reimbursement systems that pay for the services. Helping patients access their benefits and manage those benefits effectively is often critical to the outcome. Advocating for quality care, access to care, and even evidence-based care, is part of the advocacy. Sometimes it’s as simple as getting people involved in the patient’s care to listen—to take a pause and think about what the patient is trying to say or wants.  In a world that is stressing value-based care and quality performance measures, the case manager role becomes more vital. We are vital to driving quality health care, helping manage benefits at the right place, right time, etc., and ultimately to the cost management of large populations.

Q: Can you describe an important case you’ve worked on?
A:
One that always stands out in my mind was a victim of a mass shooting known as the Standard Gravure Shooting in Louisville, Ky., in 1989.  It’s important to me because gun violence and violence in the work place has become a weekly headline.  But this event drew national publicity.  Within hours of the shooting, I was being called to be the case manager for some of the victims. One was a gentleman who had worked in the plant over 40 years. This wasn’t just a patient with serious physical wounds, but one with emotional trauma. I remained a part of his case until the day he returned to work, which was his personal goal. I followed him the first year in his new job.  But this patient, this case, changed my awareness of the importance of integrating physical and behavioral health into care planning. 

Q: What is the biggest challenge related to case management?
A:
Establishing trust with patients.  Today we talk about “patient experience” and “patient engagement” and this applies to case managers as well. Many patients or families initially see you as the person who is coming to take something away. It takes skill to help a patient with complex issues to understand that you are there to assess the situation and can actually help. There are also challenges in health reform itself and the demand for quality case managers. 

Q: I understand you helped write t sample test questions to become a certified case manager in the 1980’s. How has this specialty evolved since then?
A:
Back when case management started, it was very episodic. Up until the early 1990’s, you would take one case, then another, and we thought that receiving a case referral six months after a diagnosis or three months after an injury was “early.” It used to be based on the idea that something had to have already happened. Now, I’m looking out across the population with predictive analytics information on a subset of that people in a community and trying to identify where I could best place a case manager.

An additional change is the growing numbers of certified case managers. The recognition of case managers in the continuum of health care has been part of the evolution. They are valued as key members of the team, in whatever setting. Case managers have started to be identified as part of the preventive services, not just a referral after a catastrophic event.

Q: Why should nurses in other practice areas pay attention to National Case Management Week and what are some ways nurses can celebrate?
A:
National Case Management Week, like other specialty recognition weeks, affords an opportunity to learn about nurses and other professionals who are part of an integrated care team. Gaining insight into the training, the various job roles, and what a case manager can “make happen” could help other nurses collaborate with this key person on the team.  It might even help nurses who are interested in the specialty of case management find an open door.

Q: What do you see for the future of nurses and case managers?
I see that the role of nurses in general has really come back to that primary care model. We want to coordinate end-to-end care for the patient, and I think the future holds more case managers taking the lead coordinating for the patient across the entire continuum of care. I see unlimited possibilities, but I certainly see an increased demand not just for nurses, but for case managers. Technology will also continue to play a big role. The skill sets have changed and over the years I’ve hired 2,000 case managers in a variety of settings, and I can tell you that the skill sets to do this work require so much knowledge about the software for the documentation and for the reporting. Plus, many of our case managers are virtual, so the settings will continue to change. A person needs to survive in a virtual workforce.
 
More Reading & Resources
Professional Case Management
Nurse On the Move: Carolyn Ackerman (podcast)
Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski
 
Posted: 9/23/2016 9:47:00 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Leadership Nurse On the Move


10 Ways to Make the Most of Your Holiday Nursing Shift

 
10 Ways to make the most of the holiday nursing shift.pngAs October comes to a close, we can feel the excitement and, at times, stress of the holidays approaching. While many people are out buying their last-minute Halloween costumes or planning their Thanksgiving menu, or even setting up their Christmas decorations (we know, early!), nurses are preparing for working their holiday shifts. 

Working over the holidays is a reality check for nurses. While other professionals get this time off to be with their loved ones, nurses are caring for their patients and working to ensure the safety of other people’s friends and family members. While it is an honor at any time to care for the sick or injured, we understand it can be especially difficult at the celebratory times of the year. 

To make these occurrences a tad easier, and even fun, here are 10 ways to make the most of your holiday nursing shift. 

1. Plan ahead
Start planning your holiday shifts way ahead of time. Coordinate with your loved ones on days to celebrate that work around your schedule. For instance, if you are working over Thanksgiving, plan to celebrate a day or two later. Speak with your manager about the best way to ensure you are there to cover your shift, but that you also have time built in for those holidays that are important to you. 

2. Ask for help
Do you normally do the bulk of the Christmas or Hanukkah cooking? Ask your family members to pitch in or organize a pot luck so everyone shares the labor. If you know you are scheduled to work over a holiday, know your limits and time constraints and ask those around you to assist in the holiday preparations.

3. Be prepared
If you are scheduled to work over certain holidays, be prepared to meet any holiday-related needs of patients. Be on the lookout for complications of diabetes and dehydration over Halloween and be sensitive to how costumes may interfere with your ability to care for a patient or how they may affect a patient, especially those with a mental illness. Be ready for cooking-related injuries, such as burns or cuts, around Thanksgiving. Pay extra attention to patients suffering from depression around Christmas and New Year’s Eve. If you know what to look for, you will feel more prepared when encountering these situations. 

4. Make your work space feel like home
With permission from your manager, decorate your work station over the holidays. Put up paper pumpkins and turkeys. String twinkle lights and set up a holiday tree or bush. Just be sure to be sensitive and inclusive of everyone’s holidays, not just your own. 

5. Organize a work party
Many times, your co-workers can feel like family. Take some time during a shift to celebrate with your team. Have everyone bring in their favorite holiday treat or consider exchanging small gifts. You may also consider planning a holiday party outside of your work setting. It’s nice to take the time out to blow off steam and enjoy your co-workers’ company. 

6. Celebrate when you can
Working over New Year’s Eve? Celebrate at a time that works for you. Start the countdown at 5am with the other nurses working alongside you. If you want to celebrate with family and friends, you can do the same – pick another day and/or time, adjust your clocks and watches and ring in the New Year accordingly. 

7. Be resourceful 
Make the most of your breaks during your shift. If able, Skype with friends and family, follow their photos on Facebook or Instagram, or ask someone to share videos of the holiday gatherings with you. Utilize available technology to stay as connected as possible. 

8. Be mindful
Be mindful that the patients are there for the holidays too. Try to lift their spirits by asking if they would like their room decorated or try speaking with them about happy holiday memories. You may be able to help accommodate visitors or help patients get in touch with family and friends. 

9. Know your limits
Too busy to decorate for your favorite holiday? Not enough time to go to the mall to buy gifts? Too stressed to cook your traditional holiday meals? Cut corners where you can; shop online, skip the decorating all together, order take-out or pick up prepared food from a local store. Determine what you can do without and compromise where you can. 

10. Focus on the positive
Depending on your work place, there may be benefits to working a holiday shift, such as extra pay or the next holiday off. During the holidays, you may also get to enjoy a slower work pace and a shorter commute. On top of that, you are in it together with your fellow nurses and your patients, who all are there to share the holiday with you. 

How do you make your nursing holiday shift work for you? For other ideas, check out this blog from Lippincott Solutions, Holiday Nursing Shift Work
 
More Reading & Resources
Time management tips for busy nurses
Maintaining Work-Life Balance [Infographic]
Celebrate Nursing in 2016

 
Posted: 10/25/2016 8:27:56 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

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Lifelong Learning in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

 With the end of 2016 quickly approaching, it’s important to look ahead to the future trends happening in the nursing profession. More and more, nurses are going back to school to earn higher degrees, but why? "Life-long learning keeps nurses up-to-date on the advances in practice and can help them critically think more thoroughly because they have more evidence and information to inform their practice decisions,” explains our Chief Nurse, Anne Dabrow Woods DNP RN CRNP ANP-BC AGACNP-BC FAAN.

Whether you’re a nurse with a diploma or associate’s degree contemplating achieving your BSN, or you’re looking to pursue an advanced degree in nursing, you’re not alone. According to a 2014 survey by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), there’s been a “4.2% increase in students in entry-level baccalaureate programs (BSN) and a 10.4% increase in ‘RN-to-BSN’ programs for registered nurses looking to build on their initial education at the associate degree or diploma level. In graduate schools, student enrollment increased by 6.6% in master’s programs and by 3.2% and 26.2% in research-focused and practice-focused doctoral programs, respectively.”

With this new shift to lifelong learning in nursing, educators are adapting the way to they teach their students. “When we were [originally] taught how to educate students,” Woods says, “we were taught to sit them in a classroom and to lecture to them. That is not reality anymore today. What we’ve seen is a whole flip of the classroom so that the students or nurses…read, learn, and then come together and they discuss how to actually apply the principles that they’ve learned. That’s called the ‘flipped classroom,’ and that is what we are going to be using from now on.” 

To discover more about the flipped classroom and other changes in lifelong learning in nursing, utilize this handy infographic. 
macro trend in nursing 3: lifelong learning in nursing
 
Remember to bookmark our blog and look out for the next three trends in nursing. Our Chief Nurse also gave a presentation on the six key trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/november-2016/lifelong-learning-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursi"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/November-2016/lifelong-learning-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursi/macrotrend-3-infographic_lifelong-learning-in-nursing.png.aspx?width=300&height=750></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/november-2016/lifelong-learning-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursi"> Lifelong Learning in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

More Reading & Resources
Focus On: The Future of Nursing 
Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing [Infographic]
Nursing education: Flipping the classroom
Quantitative Outcomes for Nursing Students in a Flipped Classroom 

 

Posted: 11/28/2016 8:34:54 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


​Nursing Conferences and Events in 2017

nursing conferences and events 2017It’s hard to believe that 2016 is coming to a close. We’ve had some amazing experiences at nursing conferences and events this year. 

Our senior publisher, Bob Maroldo, and I attended the NSNA Annual Convention in the spring in Orlando, where I met many excited and eager nursing students about to start their careers. I also had the chance to go to Nursing2016 Symposium and National Conference for Nurse Practitioners (NCNP) in Orlando with our clinical editor, Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP. You can see a highlights video of all the fun we had on our Lippincott YouTube Channel.

 
ncnp conference 2016Lisa also attended the NCNP’s fall conference in Chicago with our senior editor, Kim Fryling-Resare, as well as Nursing Management Congress (NMC) 2016 in Las Vegas. 

Our team had a blast meeting and greeting nurses from all different practice areas and specialties -- we can’t wait for the upcoming nursing events in 2017! We compiled a variety of nursing conferences and events happening next year and here are a few to look out for.

Nursing Events 2017
• National Conference for Nurse Practitioners: The Conference for Primary and Acute Care Clinicians, April 19-22nd, Nashville, TN. 
• Nursing Management Congress 2017, October 2-6th, Las Vegas, NV.
National Conference for Nurse Practitioners: The Conference for Primary and Acute Care Clinicians, October 9-12th, Las Vegas, NV.

To see all the nursing conferences in 2017, visit our Nursing Events Calendar.

Which conferences are you planning to attend? 

 
Posted: 12/8/2016 8:02:11 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Let’s celebrate! The Textbook of Basic Nursing reaches its 50th anniversary.

 
textbook-blog-wordcloud-(2).pngWith its 11th edition, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Textbook of Basic Nursing, a step-by-step 
comprehensive text that walks LPN/LVN nursing students through basic skills, procedures, concepts, and clinical applications. Based on the NCLEX-PN framework, this engaging text introduced critical thinking to nursing students for the past 50 years thanks to its two authors, Caroline Rosdahl RN, BSN, MA and Mary Kowalski RN, BA, BSN, MSN . Both Rosdahl and Kowalski have been major contributors to the nursing industry since the beginning of their careers. They’ve witnessed first-hand how nursing education has grown and evolved, and they’ve been able to translate these changes into meaningful educational tools for their readers.
 
During Rosdahl’s time in graduate school, she was approached by someone looking to set up a nursing school and began to write behavioral objectives for them. Rosdahl encountered some push-back from her colleagues, who considered nursing to be “too emotional and too psychological” to have objectives, but she wrote them anyway. After people saw her objectives, she got requests for her syllabi, which led Lippincott to approach her in 1967 to join the textbook’s 2nd edition, which now includes behavioral objectives in every chapter. “I felt I had something unique to offer that hadn’t been done in nursing before,” says Rosdahl. Kowalski joined the textbook as a consultant for its 6th edition, and then became co-author on its 8th edition, which published in 2002. She graduated from nursing school in 1975 and started as a nurse’s aide. When she returned to nursing school, she really enjoyed writing and reading, which translated to her work on the textbook. “I got to learn all of the updated materials, and I’ve enjoyed making sure the students have the information they need. I was an instructor for 25 years, and I really enjoy working with the nursing students,” Kowalski says.

“It’s amazing how many things have changed,” since she started writing for the textbook states Rosdahl. “From government regulations to procedures to equipment,” it’s been a challenge to ensure the textbook stays current she says, but “it is rewarding to see it in print and to see people use it in practice. To think I’ve been around so long is quite amazing.” Over the past 50 years, both Rosdahl and Kowalski have seen the role of the nurse and the technology they use evolve and become more complicated to manage. Rosdahl explains a new challenge today that nurses face is that “patients are sicker and there’s so much more equipment, there’s so many medications and treatments, that it’s not like nursing used to be.” If a patient is in a hospital today, “they have to be really critical, otherwise, they get sent home, and the nurse is expected to be able to do all of this, while also being expect to specialize. If you want to work in an ICU, you need extra training. Back in the day, I could float and work everywhere in a hospital, now a nurse can hardly go from one department to another. It’s so much more complicated.” Kowalski remembers when she started “we didn’t have I.V. pumps that could count the drips for you automatically and have an alarm go off. You had to actually count your drips from the intravenous line so you’d know you had it at the right speed. Otherwise, you’d overflow your patient or give them too much fluid or too little.” When she started in 1975, emergency rooms were just starting to use CPR and triage. “If you go to an ER now, these [nurses] are actually trained to work in an emergency room as a specialty. Now, there’s a whole training shift for acute care nursing.” 

textbook of basic nursing 11th edition coverWith all of the new training initiatives that have occurred, along with new technology being utilized to educate nurses, Kowalski urges that “machines go wrong and students don’t remember to check the machines. You have to calibrate your machines.” For instance, to put the wrong size tubing in the machine could result in the death of a patient. “We depend on the machines and not on the actual human being, but [patients] don’t push the call button because they want their machine adjusted. They push the call button because they want a person.” Rosdahl explains that when she started, nurses learned by clinical experience. They would be in the hospital, taking care of patients and learning on the job, “which was admittedly a little haphazard,” but they were getting experience with patients. “Now, so much of the education is in the laboratory with simulation. There are actually programs without any clinical experience, and that to me, is really scary because the kids get out without any idea on how to relate to a patient.” Today, students enter the workforce and experience a “culture shock,” where they are not used to working weekends, long shift hours, and interacting with patients.
 
A good change that has occurred, however, is that “there are lots of resources on the internet, which is great and helpful to the students. But sometimes, they are not accurate and you have to really be careful” of your sources, explains Rosdahl. We need to “remind the kids that the internet is not the bible,” she stresses. Kowalski agrees and is concerned about “how much time students are using to look things up” online. “When we were doing the book and editors told us ‘let’s take this part out and put it online,’ there are still a lot of students that actually need it in the book, I think. But, everything is going online, so [the editors and publishers] need to define where students will get their information, whether it’s an online chapter or in the actual book.” Regardless of where they do decide to find their information, however, the source of the information is still the most important thing. Students can value authoritative, credible resources, like the Textbook of Basic Nursing. 

For their 50th anniversary edition, Rosdahl and Kowalski have put special attention and time into the textbook. Kowalski really enjoys chapter 13 on “Older Adults and Aging,” which goes over the concept of the aging process and the concept of the paradigm shift in aging. “I had to research the definition of aging, and I discovered there is no real definition,” she says. “Aging used to be 65, but now 85 is really considered ‘older.’” With nurses now working past 65 and a new generation of nurses coming in, chapter 13 goes over the special considerations of an aging nursing workforce. Rosdahl’s favorite section of the textbook is on psychiatry, which is her specialty. She also is happy that two to three editions ago, the textbook began to include colored illustrations, “which really make a difference,” along with the teaching ancillaries. And to top it all off, Rosdahl is excited that there is now an Indonesian translation of the textbook. 

For new nurses starting out, the authors have some advice. Rosdahl advises that “all education is aimed at teaching how to learn. You can’t teach [students] all of the material, so nurses need to know that they don’t know everything, and they have to use references, other nurses, and find out what they don’t know about an individual patient. They need to know what they don’t know.” Kowalski stresses that the first year of their career is the most critical. “They need to know they will be scared to death. They don’t know what to do and they will say they didn’t learn anything in nursing school…but in the next three months things will become calmer for them in the real world. Then by the sixth month after they graduated, they will think ‘oh, I can do this,” but then will become cocky. They start taking shortcuts, which is when the most errors occur – it’s between the sixth month post-graduation to the ninth month.” The last three months of that first year, she says, are where you really understand what they’re doing as a nurse. 

As Rosdahl and Kowalski turn their attention to the next 50 years to come, they see a bright future for nursing. “We are going to have more men in nursing,” predicts Rosdahl, and “with that, comes a difference in salaries, which will increase.” She also believes that nursing will continue to grow more complicated over time, and “we’re going to need more nurses, we are going to need more specialized nurses, and we are going to need more nurses in the community. People are sent home early and they will need to be cared for.” Kowalski predicts there will be more machines and computers in nursing than there are today. The information will be more automated, she explains, and that it is “both good and bad. The information is numbers, which doesn’t tell you if your patient is crashing.” Nurses will continue to need to learn how to interpret these numbers and the machines to benefit their patients. 

To learn more from these authors, visit the Textbook of Basic Nursing

 
Posted: 1/6/2017 9:20:02 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

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The Nursing Workforce is Changing: Macro Trends in Nursing [Infographic]

“The workforce is changing…We know that just by going into work every day.” For our fourth macro trend in nursing, our Chief Nurse, Anne Dabrow Woods DNP RN CRNP ANP-BC AGACNP-BC FAAN, surveys the ways in which the nursing workforce is evolving and adapting. From more men entering the profession, to more nurses with a wider range of specialties, to nurses staying in practice longer, the nursing population is not what is used to be. 

Review our handy infographic below to discover the six ways the nursing workforce is changing.
 
  the nursing workforce is changing infographic

Don’t forget to bookmark our blog and to keep an eye out for the final two trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel.

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/january-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/January-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-infographic.png.aspx?width=300&height=750></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/january-2017/the-nursing-workforce-is-changing-macro-trends-in"> The Nursing Workforce is Changing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>
 
More Reading & Resources
Emotional Intelligence in Nurse: Male vs. Female
Men in Nursing: Emphasis on the Results of a Grounded Theory Study
73 is the New 65: Educating and Retaining the Aging Nursing Workforce
Lifelong Learning in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

 
Posted: 1/13/2017 9:36:37 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

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