Source:

Nursing2015

August 2012, Volume 42 Number 8 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Authors

  • Diana Bitritto RN
  • Gail Reiner DNP, MS, FNP-c
  • Jan Panyard-Davis RN
  • Jan Auerbach MSN, RN, LP

Abstract

I wanted to give my 2 cents on "Nurses and Body Art: What's your Perception?" (June, 2012).* One topic the article didn't touch on was the type and size of the tattoo. I have two very pretty tattoos on my right forearm, vines with cherries, and I've received plenty of compliments from patients about them. They've become conversation starters to help break the ice. I also have a few more that are covered by clothing.Something small and innocuous, like flowers or stars, should be okay to show. It might be kind of dicey to have a Yankees emblem tattoo if your patient roots for the Mets or the Boston Red Sox, but it would sure get the conversation flowing!Thank you for publishing our article, "Mitochondrial Diseases: Problems in the Power Plant" (June, 2012).* We think that readers will benefit from learning about this group of genetic disorders that can cause serious disabilities.We'd like readers to know, however, that the article contains an error that was inadvertently introduced in your

 

I wanted to give my 2 cents on "Nurses and Body Art: What's your Perception?" (June, 2012).* One topic the article didn't touch on was the type and size of the tattoo. I have two very pretty tattoos on my right forearm, vines with cherries, and I've received plenty of compliments from patients about them. They've become conversation starters to help break the ice. I also have a few more that are covered by clothing.

 

Something small and innocuous, like flowers or stars, should be okay to show. It might be kind of dicey to have a Yankees emblem tattoo if your patient roots for the Mets or the Boston Red Sox, but it would sure get the conversation flowing!

 

Thank you for publishing our article, "Mitochondrial Diseases: Problems in the Power Plant" (June, 2012).* We think that readers will benefit from learning about this group of genetic disorders that can cause serious disabilities.

 

We'd like readers to know, however, that the article contains an error that was inadvertently introduced in your editing. In the discussion of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the article says that mothers of patients with LHON become blind in their teens. That isn't correct. The mothers don't have vision problems themselves and usually don't know they carry the mutation. It's their sons with LHON who become blind in their teens or early 20s. Thank you for allowing us to correct this error.

 

Editor's note: The corrected version of this article is available at http://www.nursing2012.com.

 

I wanted to thank you again for the fantastic honor of being named your Nurse of the Year, which included the opportunity to attend the Nursing2012 Symposium in April. I'm truly humbled that I received recognition for simply doing my job, something I still love after 35 years. If my story motivates other nurses to get involved in humanitarian work in some capacity, then that makes this recognition even more special!

 

Nursing2012 Symposium was one of the best conferences I've attended in years. Most appealing to me was that the content was generic, and therefore appropriate for nurses across all specialties. I not only look forward to attending in the future, but will most certainly recommend this conference to my colleagues.

 

-DIANA BITRITTO, RN

 

Cliffside Park, NJ

 

-GAIL REINER, DNP, MS, FNP-c

 

JAN PANYARD-DAVIS, RN

 

San Diego, Calif

 

.

 

-JAN AUERBACH, MSN, RN, LP

 

Dallas, Tex

 

* Individual subscribers can access articles free online at http://www.nursing2012.com. [Context Link]

Tattoo acceptance

I wanted to give my 2 cents on "Nurses and Body Art: What's your Perception?" (June, 2012).* One topic the article didn't touch on was the type and size of the tattoo. I have two very pretty tattoos on my right forearm, vines with cherries, and I've received plenty of compliments from patients about them. They've become conversation starters to help break the ice. I also have a few more that are covered by clothing.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

Something small and innocuous, like flowers or stars, should be okay to show. It might be kind of dicey to have a Yankees emblem tattoo if your patient roots for the Mets or the Boston Red Sox, but it would sure get the conversation flowing!

Correcting an error

Thank you for publishing our article, "Mitochondrial Diseases: Problems in the Power Plant" (June, 2012).* We think that readers will benefit from learning about this group of genetic disorders that can cause serious disabilities.

We'd like readers to know, however, that the article contains an error that was inadvertently introduced in your editing. In the discussion of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the article says that mothers of patients with LHON become blind in their teens. That isn't correct. The mothers don't have vision problems themselves and usually don't know they carry the mutation. It's their sons with LHON who become blind in their teens or early 20s. Thank you for allowing us to correct this error.

Editor's note: The corrected version of this article is available at http://www.nursing2012.com.

Kudos from our Nurse of the Year

I wanted to thank you again for the fantastic honor of being named your Nurse of the Year, which included the opportunity to attend the Nursing2012 Symposium in April. I'm truly humbled that I received recognition for simply doing my job, something I still love after 35 years. If my story motivates other nurses to get involved in humanitarian work in some capacity, then that makes this recognition even more special!

Nursing2012 Symposium was one of the best conferences I've attended in years. Most appealing to me was that the content was generic, and therefore appropriate for nurses across all specialties. I not only look forward to attending in the future, but will most certainly recommend this conference to my colleagues.

-DIANA BITRITTO, RN

Cliffside Park, NJ

-GAIL REINER, DNP, MS, FNP-c

JAN PANYARD-DAVIS, RN

San Diego, Calif

.

-JAN AUERBACH, MSN, RN, LP

Dallas, Tex

* Individual subscribers can access articles free online at http://www.nursing2012.com. [Context Link]