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Nursing2015

July 2004, Volume 34 Number 7 , p 35 - 35 [FREE]

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    Blood proteins indicating early artery damage may also warn of Type 2 diabetes. Researchers evaluating records of blood taken from 32,826 women say they found evidence of artery damage as much as 8 years before diabetes was diagnosed.

    Researchers analyzed blood work records from 1989 and 1990 as part of the Nurses' Health Study. They looked for elevated levels of three blood proteins: E-selectin, ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). Elevations in these proteins suggest irritated or damaged cells lining blood vessel walls.

    In the decade following their blood tests, 737 of the women developed Type 2 diabetes. From the records, the researchers made these findings:

    * Women with the highest levels of E-selectin were about five times more likely to develop diabetes than women with the lowest levels.

    * Those with the highest ICAM-1 levels had a risk that was about ...

 

Blood proteins indicating early artery damage may also warn of Type 2 diabetes. Researchers evaluating records of blood taken from 32,826 women say they found evidence of artery damage as much as 8 years before diabetes was diagnosed.

 

Researchers analyzed blood work records from 1989 and 1990 as part of the Nurses' Health Study. They looked for elevated levels of three blood proteins: E-selectin, ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). Elevations in these proteins suggest irritated or damaged cells lining blood vessel walls.

 

In the decade following their blood tests, 737 of the women developed Type 2 diabetes. From the records, the researchers made these findings:

 

* Women with the highest levels of E-selectin were about five times more likely to develop diabetes than women with the lowest levels.

 

* Those with the highest ICAM-1 levels had a risk that was about three times greater than that for women with the lowest levels.

 

* Elevated VCAM-1 levels increased the risk of disease in some, but not all, women.

 

 

Cells that line the blood vessels produce E-selectin, sometimes in response to inflammation. White blood cells and vessel-lining cells produce the other two proteins in response to inflammation.

 

These findings further strengthen the link between diabetes and silent inflammation.

Blood proteins indicating early artery damage may also warn of Type 2 diabetes. Researchers evaluating records of blood taken from 32,826 women say they found evidence of artery damage as much as 8 years before diabetes was diagnosed.

Researchers analyzed blood work records from 1989 and 1990 as part of the Nurses' Health Study. They looked for elevated levels of three blood proteins: E-selectin, ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). Elevations in these proteins suggest irritated or damaged cells lining blood vessel walls.

In the decade following their blood tests, 737 of the women developed Type 2 diabetes. From the records, the researchers made these findings:

* Women with the highest levels of E-selectin were about five times more likely to develop diabetes than women with the lowest levels.

* Those with the highest ICAM-1 levels had a risk that was about three times greater than that for women with the lowest levels.

* Elevated VCAM-1 levels increased the risk of disease in some, but not all, women.

Cells that line the blood vessels produce E-selectin, sometimes in response to inflammation. White blood cells and vessel-lining cells produce the other two proteins in response to inflammation.

These findings further strengthen the link between diabetes and silent inflammation.

Source

 

"Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus," JAMA, J. Meigs, et al., April 28, 2004.