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Source:

Nursing2015

July 2004, Volume 34 Number 7 , p 68 - 68

Author

  • CONNIE SARVIS RN, CON,C, MN

Abstract

Outline

  • What to use?

  • What about the toxins?

  • Healing interventions

  • SELECTED REFERENCES



    Graphics

  • Figure. This infecte...

    SUPPOSE YOU'RE caring for an elderly patient with a large, infected Stage III pressure ulcer on his coccyx. The ulcer, which measures 10 x 12 cm (4 × 44/5 inches), consists primarily of beefy red granulation and is covered with foul-smelling, stringy gray-green drainage. At least 3 cm (11/5 inches) of erythema, edema, and induration surround the wound. A preliminary culture of the wound reveals Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli.

    When you're developing your plan of care, consider the role the two types of bacterial toxins play in wound infection and healing.

    * Exotoxins are proteins produced and released into the body by bacteria. These toxins can cause specific diseases, such as diphtheria or tetanus, or act more ...

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