Source:

Nursing2015

October 2004, Volume 34 Number 10 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • JEANNE HELD-WARMKESSEL RN, AOCN®, APRN, BC, MSN

Abstract

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 34(10)             October 2004             p 8 Advancing a catheter: How far? [LETTERS]

HELD-WARMKESSEL, JEANNE RN, AOCN®, APRN, BC, MSN

Philadelphia, Pa.

The comments appearing in this column are excerpted from readers' correspondence. Send your letter, complete mailing address, and credentials to: Letters Editor, Nursing2004 , 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002, or e-mail to nursing@lww.com. Please include your e-mail address and daytime telephone number .

In your article on “Inserting an Indwelling Urinary Catheter in a Male Patient” (Clinical Do's and Don'ts, July 2004), you say “Advance [the catheter] 7 to 9 inches or until urine starts draining, then advance it another inch.” This isn't far enough. In a male patient, you should always insert an indwelling catheter ...

 

In your article on "Inserting an Indwelling Urinary Catheter in a Male Patient" (Clinical Do's and Don'ts, July 2004), you say "Advance [the catheter] 7 to 9 inches or until urine starts draining, then advance it another inch." This isn't far enough. In a male patient, you should always insert an indwelling catheter up to the catheter's Y bifurcation before you inflate the balloon. This ensures that the balloon isn't inflated while in the prostatic urethra, which would cause pain and bleeding.

 

JEANNE HELD-WARMKESSEL, RN, AOCN(R), APRN,BC, MSN

 

Philadelphia, Pa.

 

Richard L. Pullen, Jr., RN, EdD, responds: Your point is well taken, but I think the literature is still split on this issue. Both methods seem to meet the standard of practice. Perhaps it would have been better to say, "Advance the catheter 7 to 9 inches or until urine starts draining, then advance it another inch, or advance it to the Y bifurcation, depending on your institution's policies and procedures."

In your article on "Inserting an Indwelling Urinary Catheter in a Male Patient" (Clinical Do's and Don'ts, July 2004), you say "Advance [the catheter] 7 to 9 inches or until urine starts draining, then advance it another inch." This isn't far enough. In a male patient, you should always insert an indwelling catheter up to the catheter's Y bifurcation before you inflate the balloon. This ensures that the balloon isn't inflated while in the prostatic urethra, which would cause pain and bleeding.

JEANNE HELD-WARMKESSEL, RN, AOCN(R), APRN,BC, MSN

Philadelphia, Pa.

Richard L. Pullen, Jr., RN, EdD, responds: Your point is well taken, but I think the literature is still split on this issue. Both methods seem to meet the standard of practice. Perhaps it would have been better to say, "Advance the catheter 7 to 9 inches or until urine starts draining, then advance it another inch, or advance it to the Y bifurcation, depending on your institution's policies and procedures."