Buy this article for $3.95

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here:

When you buy this article you'll get access to the ePub version, a downloadable PDF, and the ability to print the full article.

Source:

Nursing2015

October 2004, Volume 34 Number 10 , p 20 - 20

Authors

  • JANE PERRY MA
  • JANINE JAGGER MPH, PHD

Abstract

Outline

  • Risky practices

  • Safer alternatives



    Graphics

  • Figure. Two safety d...

    SINCE THE NEEDLESTICK Safety and Prevention Act was passed more than 3 years ago, health care facilities in the United States have made substantial progress in implementing safety-engineered devices. But for some specialized procedures, finding a safe alternative to sharp devices can still be challenging. One example is umbilical cord blood collection.

    Figure. Two safety devices Risky practices

    Immediately after a baby is delivered, labor and delivery (L&D) staff typically collect blood from the umbilical cord for blood studies, such as blood typing and antibody testing. Most methods for obtaining cord blood pose a risk of exposing L&D staff to bloodborne diseases such as viral hepatitis. Here are a few of the most common methods, and the risks involved:

    * Using a conventional needle and syringe to draw ...

To continue reading, buy this article for just $3.95.

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here: