Source:

AJN, American Journal of Nursing

July 2005, Volume 105 Number 7 , p 15 - 15 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 105(7)             July 2005             p 15 HOSPITAL ERROR: Diana J. Mason, editor-in-chief, responds [DEPARTMENTS: Letters] AJN welcomes letters to the editor regarding recently published articles, although critiques of original research may be submitted at any time. Submissions must be typed, contain fewer than 300 words, and list the correspondent’s name, address, and phone number or e-mail address; include no more than three references for any statistics or studies cited. Letters will be edited for length, clarity, and accuracy. Submission of a letter will constitute the author’s permission to publish it, although it doesn’t guarantee publication. Letters become the property of AJN and may be published in all media. Send letters to AJN, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 333 Seventh Avenue, 19th Floor New York, NY 10001 ajn@lww.com; ...

 

I received two letters, including this one, suggesting that because I expressed reservations about receiving ED care for fear of being the victim of an error, my editorial somehow accused nurses of killing patients. It did not. My point was that too many hospitals have not created cultures of safety or systems of care that would prevent errors, as other industries have done, and that nurses should lead the way in forcing institutions to put patient safety first. Nurses and physicians in EDs are human-they make mistakes if institutions don't implement strategies that have been proved to prevent them.

I received two letters, including this one, suggesting that because I expressed reservations about receiving ED care for fear of being the victim of an error, my editorial somehow accused nurses of killing patients. It did not. My point was that too many hospitals have not created cultures of safety or systems of care that would prevent errors, as other industries have done, and that nurses should lead the way in forcing institutions to put patient safety first. Nurses and physicians in EDs are human-they make mistakes if institutions don't implement strategies that have been proved to prevent them.