Source:

MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing

December 2005, Volume 30 Number 6 , p 414 - 414 [FREE]

Author

  • Shannon Perry PhD, RN, FAAN

Abstract

 

The article "Using Medications in Pregnancy and Lactation" (MCN 30[1], January 2005) is a very good integration of the physiology of pregnancy and lactation and the use of medications.

 

I do have one question: there is a statement that "Only unbound drugs are capable of crossing the placenta; because of this, protein-bound drugs (such as digoxin or ampicillin) can reach higher concentrations in the fetus (Loebstein et al., 1997)." I don't understand this; if digoxin or ampicillin are protein-bound, they should not be able to cross the placenta to create higher concentrations in the fetus. Could you please clarify this for me?

 

Shannon Perry, PhD, RN, FAAN

The article "Using Medications in Pregnancy and Lactation" (MCN 30[1], January 2005) is a very good integration of the physiology of pregnancy and lactation and the use of medications.

I do have one question: there is a statement that "Only unbound drugs are capable of crossing the placenta; because of this, protein-bound drugs (such as digoxin or ampicillin) can reach higher concentrations in the fetus (Loebstein et al., 1997)." I don't understand this; if digoxin or ampicillin are protein-bound, they should not be able to cross the placenta to create higher concentrations in the fetus. Could you please clarify this for me?

Shannon Perry, PhD, RN, FAAN