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Source:

Nursing2015

February 2006, Volume 36 Number 2 , p 68 - 68

Authors

  • JANE PERRY MA
  • JANINE JAGGER MPH, PHD

Abstract


PERRY, JANE MA; JAGGER, JANINE MPH, PHD

INJURIES TO NURSES from conventional I.V. catheters declined by 55% from 1993 to 2001. The most recent data from the Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet) show an even bigger drop: From 2001 to 2004, injuries decreased by another 63%. This can be directly correlated to the implementation of I.V. safety catheters, which had captured 94% of the U.S. I.V. catheter acute care market as of 2004. Implementation of safety I.V. catheters has become a priority in most U.S. health care facilities—especially since the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act mandated the use of safety devices in 2000.

Anesthesiologists hold out

This success story has one less-than-bright spot, however: Anesthesiologists, for various reasons, have resisted adopting safety I.V. catheters. In an article in the newsletter of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), the authors state, “Many anesthesiologists have expressed concern ...

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