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Source:

Nursing2015

September 2006, Volume 36 Number 9 , p 30 - 31

Authors

  • ANNE MARIE FREY RN, CRNI, BSN
  • GREGORY J. SCHEARS MD

Abstract


FREY, ANNE MARIE RN, CRNI, BSN; SCHEARS, GREGORY J. MD

TAPE AND SUTURES HAVE long been used to secure I.V. catheters—but are these the best evidence-based practices or just ingrained habits? We reviewed seven studies comparing catheters secured by tape, sutures, and a catheter securement device (the StatLock by Venetec International, Inc., is the only one that's been studied). All seven studies found the lowest complication rates for patients in the device group; in five of these studies, the reduction in complications was statistically significant. Using a catheter securement device appears not only to keep the catheter in place, but also to reduce trauma to blood vessels and lower rates of phlebitis and vessel occlusion. The device also did as well or better than suturing at reducing catheter-associated bloodstream infections. In addition, it prolonged catheter dwell times and reduced the need for restarting an I.V. line.

So why don't more clinicians use this device? Most ...

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