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Source:

Nursing2015

December 2006, Volume 36 Number 12 , p 80 - 80

Author

  • ROSE SHAFFER RN, CRNP, BC, CCRN, MSN

Abstract



SHAFFER, ROSE RN, CRNP, BC, CCRN, MSN

Cardiology Nurse Practitioner, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. Figure. No caption available.

RESPONDING TO THE call bell, you find Jerri Gruber, 45, lying supine in bed after cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). She tells you that she tried to shift her weight and felt a “pop” in her right groin, followed by warm fluid running down her leg. When you check her femoral access site, you find the dressing saturated with blood and swelling around the right groin.

Her vital signs are pulse, 80; BP, 126/76; and respirations, 24. Her skin is warm and dry, and she's in normal sinus rhythm. She's alert and oriented to time, place, and person, but concerned about what happened.

What's the situation?

Earlier today, Ms. Gruber underwent placement of a drug-eluting stent to treat a 90% stenosis of her right coronary artery. Before the procedure, she ...

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