Source:

Nursing2015

May 2007, Volume 37 Number 5 , p 33 - 34 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

 

To the detriment of patient care, direct communication between hospital-based physicians (hospitalists) and primary care physicians occurs "infrequently," according to a recent study. Through a data review and observational studies, researchers evaluated communication and information transfer at hospital discharge based on timeliness, accuracy, completeness, and overall quality. They found that:

 

* direct communication between hospitalists and primary care physicians occurred only between 3% and 20% of the time

 

* the availability of a discharge summary at a patient's first postdischarge visit with his primary care provider was low (12% to 34%)

 

* discharge summaries often lacked important information, such as test results, the patient's treatment or hospital course, discharge medications, and follow-up plans. Notes on patient or family counseling were missing in about 90% of cases.

 

 

A lack of quality discharge information compromised the quality of care in about 25% of follow-up visits, the researchers estimated. They recommended using computerized summaries and standardized formats for better transfer of information between providers.

To the detriment of patient care, direct communication between hospital-based physicians (hospitalists) and primary care physicians occurs "infrequently," according to a recent study. Through a data review and observational studies, researchers evaluated communication and information transfer at hospital discharge based on timeliness, accuracy, completeness, and overall quality. They found that:

* direct communication between hospitalists and primary care physicians occurred only between 3% and 20% of the time

* the availability of a discharge summary at a patient's first postdischarge visit with his primary care provider was low (12% to 34%)

* discharge summaries often lacked important information, such as test results, the patient's treatment or hospital course, discharge medications, and follow-up plans. Notes on patient or family counseling were missing in about 90% of cases.

A lack of quality discharge information compromised the quality of care in about 25% of follow-up visits, the researchers estimated. They recommended using computerized summaries and standardized formats for better transfer of information between providers.

Source

 

Kripalani S, et al., Deficits in communication and information transfer between hospital-based and primary care physicians, Journal of the American Medical Association, February 28, 2007.