Source:

Nursing2015

August 2007, Volume 37 Number 8 , p 30 - 30 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

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Acute ...

 

Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Administering indomethacin rectally before the procedure may lower the incidence and severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis, new research suggests.

 

The study involved 245 patients who received 100 mg of indomethacin in a rectal suppository and 245 who received an inert suppository immediately before a scheduled ERCP. Of the 442 who subsequently underwent ERCP, 22 (5%) developed pancreatitis. Of those 22 patients, 15 had received the placebo and 7 had received indomethacin. Those in the placebo group had a significantly higher incidence of pancreatitis that was moderate to severe.

 

Pancreatic duct injection is a known risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis. Among the 44 patients who underwent this procedure, only 1 from the indomethacin group developed pancreatitis, compared with 8 patients in the placebo group.

 

Researchers recommend using "this simple, cheap, and safe medication" to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis or lessen its severity.

Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Administering indomethacin rectally before the procedure may lower the incidence and severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis, new research suggests.

The study involved 245 patients who received 100 mg of indomethacin in a rectal suppository and 245 who received an inert suppository immediately before a scheduled ERCP. Of the 442 who subsequently underwent ERCP, 22 (5%) developed pancreatitis. Of those 22 patients, 15 had received the placebo and 7 had received indomethacin. Those in the placebo group had a significantly higher incidence of pancreatitis that was moderate to severe.

Pancreatic duct injection is a known risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis. Among the 44 patients who underwent this procedure, only 1 from the indomethacin group developed pancreatitis, compared with 8 patients in the placebo group.

Researchers recommend using "this simple, cheap, and safe medication" to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis or lessen its severity.

Source

 

Sotoudehmanesh R, et al., Indomethacin may reduce the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis after ERCP, American Journal of Gastroenterology, May 2007.