Source:

Nursing2015

November 2007, Volume 37 Number 11 , p 34 - 34 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

function openWeblink(url,target,width) { if (!width) width = '100%'; var newWindow; newWindow = window.open(url,target,'width='+width+',height=480,status,resizable,titlebar,toolbar,scrollbars'); newWindow.focus(); } function set_JnlFullText_Print() { metaTag = document.createElement('meta'); metaTag.setAttribute('name','OvidPageId'); metaTag.setAttribute('content','JnlFullText_Print'); head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; head.appendChild(metaTag); return; } if (window.addEventListener) { // DOM Level 2 Event Module (NS 6+) window.addEventListener('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print(),false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE 5+ Event Model window.attachEvent('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print); } // For anything else, just don't add the event Full Text   #header-block { display: none; } © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 37(11), November 2007, p 34 Watch out for kids with hypertension [Feature: CLINICAL ROUNDS: NEWS, UPDATES, RESEARCH: PEDIATRICS] ...

 

Many children and adolescents with hypertension are undiagnosed and untreated, researchers report. Detecting hypertension in children is more difficult than in adults, and many practitioners don't watch for it because they consider hypertension to be an adult condition.

 

Researchers reviewed medical records of 14,187 patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who had three or more well-child care visits between 1999 and 2006. In all, 507 children and adolescents (3.6%) had hypertension, but only 26% of them were diagnosed with the condition-even though their medical records contained enough information to make the diagnosis. Among 485 other patients with prehypertension, practitioners documented an appropriate diagnosis for only 55 patients (11%).

 

Researchers recommend building a program into electronic medical records that would automatically review current and prior blood pressures, age, height and weight, and sex and alert the practitioner about abnormal blood pressure criteria. If hypertension isn't managed early, it can do serious damage to vital organs by the time it's detected.

Many children and adolescents with hypertension are undiagnosed and untreated, researchers report. Detecting hypertension in children is more difficult than in adults, and many practitioners don't watch for it because they consider hypertension to be an adult condition.

 
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Researchers reviewed medical records of 14,187 patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who had three or more well-child care visits between 1999 and 2006. In all, 507 children and adolescents (3.6%) had hypertension, but only 26% of them were diagnosed with the condition-even though their medical records contained enough information to make the diagnosis. Among 485 other patients with prehypertension, practitioners documented an appropriate diagnosis for only 55 patients (11%).

Researchers recommend building a program into electronic medical records that would automatically review current and prior blood pressures, age, height and weight, and sex and alert the practitioner about abnormal blood pressure criteria. If hypertension isn't managed early, it can do serious damage to vital organs by the time it's detected.

Source

 

Hansen ML, et al., Underdiagnosis of hypertension in children and adolescents, JAMA, August 22/29, 2007.