Source:

Nursing2015

December 2007, Volume 37 Number 12 , p 33 - 33 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

function openWeblink(url,target,width) { if (!width) width = '100%'; var newWindow; newWindow = window.open(url,target,'width='+width+',height=480,status,resizable,titlebar,toolbar,scrollbars'); newWindow.focus(); } function set_JnlFullText_Print() { metaTag = document.createElement('meta'); metaTag.setAttribute('name','OvidPageId'); metaTag.setAttribute('content','JnlFullText_Print'); head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; head.appendChild(metaTag); return; } if (window.addEventListener) { // DOM Level 2 Event Module (NS 6+) window.addEventListener('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print(),false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE 5+ Event Model window.attachEvent('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print); } // For anything else, just don't add the event Full Text   #header-block { display: none; } © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 37(12), December 2007, p 33 Standardizing HbA1C reporting [Feature: CLINICAL ROUNDS: NEWS, UPDATES, RESEARCH: DIABETES ...

 

An international effort is under way to standardize hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test reporting for patients with diabetes. Experts say expressing the value in mg/dL, the same unit of measure used to express standard glucose self-monitoring values, will make more sense to patients. The HbA1C value is currently expressed as a percentage.

 

Results of a major study, the HbA1C-derived Average Glucose trial, demonstrate a close correlation between HbA1C and average glucose measurements obtained over 3 months. This allows the HbA1C value to be accurately translated into an estimated average glucose value, researchers say. They emphasize that the test itself doesn't change; rather, results are determined using different algorithms. Using the new reference method, an HbA1C result of 7.5% would be equivalent to an estimated average blood glucose of 188 mg/dL. Researchers presented their findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 43rd Annual Meeting in September.

An international effort is under way to standardize hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test reporting for patients with diabetes. Experts say expressing the value in mg/dL, the same unit of measure used to express standard glucose self-monitoring values, will make more sense to patients. The HbA1C value is currently expressed as a percentage.

Results of a major study, the HbA1C-derived Average Glucose trial, demonstrate a close correlation between HbA1C and average glucose measurements obtained over 3 months. This allows the HbA1C value to be accurately translated into an estimated average glucose value, researchers say. They emphasize that the test itself doesn't change; rather, results are determined using different algorithms. Using the new reference method, an HbA1C result of 7.5% would be equivalent to an estimated average blood glucose of 188 mg/dL. Researchers presented their findings at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 43rd Annual Meeting in September.