Source:

Nursing2015

September 2008, Volume 38 Number 9 , p 24 - 25 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

 

Death rates declined significantly in the United States between 2005 and 2006, based on new data from the CDC. The age-adjusted rate fell to 776 deaths per 100,000 people in 2006, compared with 799 per 100,000 in 2005. In the same period, life expectancy at birth hit an all-time high: 78 years.

 

Death rates for 8 out of the 10 leading causes of death declined significantly in 2006-most notably, a sharp drop of 12.8% in deaths from influenza and pneumonia.

 

The data are based on 95% of death certificates collected in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

 

Source: Heron MP, et al., Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2006, National Vital Statistics Reports, June 11, 2008.

Death rates declined significantly in the United States between 2005 and 2006, based on new data from the CDC. The age-adjusted rate fell to 776 deaths per 100,000 people in 2006, compared with 799 per 100,000 in 2005. In the same period, life expectancy at birth hit an all-time high: 78 years.

Death rates for 8 out of the 10 leading causes of death declined significantly in 2006-most notably, a sharp drop of 12.8% in deaths from influenza and pneumonia.

The data are based on 95% of death certificates collected in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Source: Heron MP, et al., Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2006, National Vital Statistics Reports, June 11, 2008.