Source:

Nursing2015

May 2009, Volume 39 Number 5 , p 9 - 9 [FREE]

Author

  • VERONICA T. FRAZIER RN, MA

Abstract

function set_JnlFullText_Print() { metaTag = document.createElement('meta'); metaTag.setAttribute('name','OvidPageId'); metaTag.setAttribute('content','JnlFullText_Print'); head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; head.appendChild(metaTag); return; } if (window.addEventListener) { // DOM Level 2 Event Module (NS 6+) // Firefox throws an uncaught exception error executing this // code, even though it seems to work. Adding a do nothing // try/catch clause around it for now, since the exection itself // appears to be innocuous try { window.addEventListener('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print(),false); } catch(e) {} } else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE 5+ Event Model window.attachEvent('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print); } // For anything else, just don't add the event Print Close Debating the ethics of organ donation DOI: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000350744.88292.b4 ISSN: 0360-4039 Accession: 00152193-200905000-00007 Author(s):

FRAZIER, VERONICA T. RN, MA

Issue: Volume 39(5), May ...

 

I believe that organ donation is a gift one can offer to others. The issue has deep personal meaning for me and should be addressed in basic nursing education programs and in continuing education.

 

While acknowledging that your article was designed to encourage discussion, I believe that it further complicates an already emotionally charged issue calling for clear-headed reasoning. A heart may continue to beat with the assistance of mechanical ventilatory support even after brain function has completely ceased. In such cases, this artificial support may cause the victim to appear alive. That's why it's vital for healthcare professionals to know the three cardinal findings in adult brain death-coma or unresponsiveness, absence of brainstem reflexes, and apnea.1

 

Organ and tissue donation is a tough subject. As with all issues in the realm of life and death, it must be approached with both compassion and rationality.

 

VERONICA T. FRAZIER, RN, MA

 

Mt. Pleasant, S.C.

 

1. American Academy of Neurology. Practice Parameters: Determining Brain Death in Adults. http://www.aan.com/practice/guideline/uploads/118.pdf. [Context Link]

I believe that organ donation is a gift one can offer to others. The issue has deep personal meaning for me and should be addressed in basic nursing education programs and in continuing education.

While acknowledging that your article was designed to encourage discussion, I believe that it further complicates an already emotionally charged issue calling for clear-headed reasoning. A heart may continue to beat with the assistance of mechanical ventilatory support even after brain function has completely ceased. In such cases, this artificial support may cause the victim to appear alive. That's why it's vital for healthcare professionals to know the three cardinal findings in adult brain death-coma or unresponsiveness, absence of brainstem reflexes, and apnea.1

Organ and tissue donation is a tough subject. As with all issues in the realm of life and death, it must be approached with both compassion and rationality.

VERONICA T. FRAZIER, RN, MA

Mt. Pleasant, S.C.

1. American Academy of Neurology. Practice Parameters: Determining Brain Death in Adults. http://www.aan.com/practice/guideline/uploads/118.pdf. [Context Link]