Source:

Nursing2015

July 2009, Volume 39 Number 7 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • DAWN FRANCESCHINI RN, MSN

Abstract

function set_JnlFullText_Print() { metaTag = document.createElement('meta'); metaTag.setAttribute('name','OvidPageId'); metaTag.setAttribute('content','JnlFullText_Print'); head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; head.appendChild(metaTag); return; } if (window.addEventListener) { // DOM Level 2 Event Module (NS 6+) // Firefox throws an uncaught exception error executing this // code, even though it seems to work. Adding a do nothing // try/catch clause around it for now, since the exection itself // appears to be innocuous try { window.addEventListener('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print(),false); } catch(e) {} } else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE 5+ Event Model window.attachEvent('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print); } // For anything else, just don't add the event Print Close Confidentiality is key to error reporting DOI: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000357254.05475.fa ISSN: 0360-4039 Accession: 00152193-200907000-00003 Author(s):

FRANCESCHINI, DAWN RN, MSN

Issue: Volume 39(7), July ...

 

In "Barriers to Reporting Medication Errors" (Letters, March 2009)* the writer said she stopped reporting a peer's medication errors because of the peer's angry confrontation and threat of a lawsuit. It seems to me that those reviewing variances in the writer's facility don't embrace confidentiality in the variance review process. Why else would the nurse who made the mistake confront her peer?

 

Without a confidential process in place, variances may not be reported, the facility misses out on correcting both individual and systems problems, and the quality of care is compromised: a perfect storm.

 

-DAWN FRANCESCHINI, RN, MSN

 

Smithfield, R.I.

 

*Individual subscribers can also access these articles free online at http://www.nursing2009.com. [Context Link]

In "Barriers to Reporting Medication Errors" (Letters, March 2009)* the writer said she stopped reporting a peer's medication errors because of the peer's angry confrontation and threat of a lawsuit. It seems to me that those reviewing variances in the writer's facility don't embrace confidentiality in the variance review process. Why else would the nurse who made the mistake confront her peer?

Without a confidential process in place, variances may not be reported, the facility misses out on correcting both individual and systems problems, and the quality of care is compromised: a perfect storm.

-DAWN FRANCESCHINI, RN, MSN

Smithfield, R.I.

*Individual subscribers can also access these articles free online at http://www.nursing2009.com. [Context Link]