Stent Thrombosis Most Likely to Occur in Early Morning

Coronary artery stent thrombosis happens mainly around 7:00 a.m., and during the summer

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery stent thrombosis tends to follow circadian and seasonal fluctuations, occurring most frequently in the early morning and during the summer, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Karim D. Mahmoud, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues investigated the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. They used the Mayo Clinic Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry to identify patients with thrombosis in a previously stented coronary artery, and used the medical records to verify the date and time of the onset of symptoms.

The researchers found that, in the 124 patients identified as having definite stent thrombosis, there was a significant association between the onset of stent thrombosis and time of day, peaking at 7:00 a.m. However, when the patients were subdivided based on how long after stenting the thrombosis occurred, only early stent thrombosis (zero to 30 days) was significantly tied to time of day. No weekly pattern was seen; however, a seasonal pattern emerged, with stent thrombosis peaking in the summer months.

"Several physiological processes might contribute to the increased incidence of stent thrombosis in the morning," the authors write.

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