QCOR: Decrease in Hospital Admissions From 1998 to 2008

Greater decline in the proportion and number of hospitalizations for cardiac conditions

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The number and proportion of leading causes of hospital admissions decreased between 1998 and 2008, except for cardiac arrhythmias and chronic bronchitis, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke 2011 Scientific Sessions, held from May 12 to 14 in Washington, D.C.

Amit H. Sachdev, Ph.D., from Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues investigated the change in the proportion and total number of cardiac hospitalizations relative to other leading causes. Data from Medicare Provider Analysis and Review files from 1998 to 2008 were analyzed to identify the leading causes of hospitalization among 11 million Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized during 1998. For each condition, they determined the annual proportion and total number of hospital admissions.

The investigators identified eight leading causes of hospitalization in 1998. By 2008, the proportion and number of admissions decreased in six of these, and increased in two. The proportion and absolute number of hospitalizations for cardiac causes decreased by 16.8 and 7.27 percent for heart failure, 31.7 and 23.9 percent for ischemic heart disease, and 22.2 and 13.1 percent for acute myocardial infarction, but increased by 10.5 and 28.2 percent, respectively, for cardiac arrhythmia. The proportion and number of admissions for noncardiac causes decreased by 18.9 and 9.5 percent for pneumonia, 11.6 and 1.3 percent for femur neck fracture, and 14.5 and 4.4 percent for fluid and electrolyte disorders, but increased by 8.5 and 21.1 percent, respectively, for chronic bronchitis.

"From 1998 to 2008, the eight leading causes of hospitalization decreased as a proportion and total number of hospitalizations, except for cardiac arrhythmias and chronic bronchitis. In general, the rate of decline was greater for cardiac than noncardiac conditions," the authors write.

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles

Blunt Chest Trauma
Journal of Trauma Nursing, November/December 2014
Expires: 12/31/2016 CE:2 $21.95


The School Age Child with Congenital Heart Disease
MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, January/February 2015
Expires: 2/28/2017 CE:2.5 $24.95


Understanding multiple myeloma
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, January/February 2015
Expires: 2/28/2017 CE:2 $21.95


More CE Articles

Subscribe to Recommended CE

Recommended Nursing Articles

Comprehensive Care: Looking Beyond the Presenting Problem
Journal of Christian Nursing, January/March 2015
Free access will expire on March 2, 2015.


Pain and Alzheimer dementia: A largely unrecognized problem
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, January/February 2015
Free access will expire on February 16, 2015.


Glycemic control in hospitalized patients
Nursing2015 Critical Care, January 2015
Free access will expire on February 16, 2015.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events