Worse Outcomes for Stroke Patients With Delirium

Including higher mortality, longer hospitalizations, and greater post-discharge care

THURSDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients who develop delirium have worse outcomes, including higher mortality and longer hospitalizations, and are more likely to be discharged to a care facility, according to a review published online Jan. 19 in Stroke.

Qiyun Shi, M.D., from the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, and colleagues investigated the outcomes of stroke patients with delirium by systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. Ten studies including 2,004 patients met the inclusion criteria.

The researchers found that, compared with stroke patients without delirium, stroke patients with delirium had higher inpatient mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.71) and mortality at 12 months (OR, 4.91). Longer hospital stays were seen in patients with delirium compared to those who did not have delirium (mean difference, 9.39 days). The likelihood of discharge to a nursing home or other institution was increased for patients with delirium (OR, 3.39).

"Delirium is observed in up to one-third of patients admitted with an acute stroke. It is usually associated with higher mortality, longer hospitalization, and dependency after discharge. Early recognition and prevention of delirium in stroke patients may improve clinical outcomes and facilitate discharge planning," the authors write.

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