Isomaltulose Doesn't Improve Glycemic Control in Diabetes

Substitution of sucrose with isomaltulose linked to lower triglyceride levels in type 2 diabetes

FRIDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, substitution of sucrose with isomaltulose is not associated with improved glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) at 12 weeks, according to a study published online April 9 in Diabetes Care.

Stefanie Brunner, from the Technische Universität München in Munich, Germany, and colleagues investigated whether replacement of sucrose with isomaltulose in sweet foods and drinks would improve metabolic control in type 2 diabetes. A total of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to receive sweet foods containing 50 g per day of isomaltulose or sucrose for 12 weeks as part of their habitual diet. The primary outcome parameter was HbA1c at 12 weeks.

In the final analysis of 101 patients, the researchers found that isomaltulose had no significant effect on HbA1c at 12 weeks. Compared with the sucrose group, in the isomaltulose group, triglycerides were significantly lower at 12 weeks. There was no difference in any other secondary parameters.

"Substitution of 50 g/day sucrose by isomaltulose in sweet food and beverages over 12 weeks did not significantly affect HbA1c and most other metabolic and cardiovascular risk parameters," the authors write. "Although the principle of isomaltulose action is unquestionable, a more marked modification of the dietary glycemic index may be required to achieve a clinically significant improvement in glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients."

Several of the authors disclosed financial ties to Suedzucker AG, which funded the study.

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