Metabolites Linked to Insulin Resistance in Normoglycemia

Metabolites include amino acids, intermediates in glucose synthesis, ketone bodies, and fatty acids

MONDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty metabolites, including amino acids, intermediates in glucose synthesis, ketone bodies, and fatty acids, are associated with insulin resistance, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes.

Peter Würtz, Ph.D., from the University of Oulu in Finland, and colleagues performed metabolic profiling using high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 7,098 Finns (mean age, 31 years; 52 percent women).

The researchers identified 20 metabolites that were significantly associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). These included branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, intermediates in gluconeogenesis, ketone bodies, and fatty acid composition and saturation. Associations for amino acids Leu, Ile, Val, and Tyr were sex- and obesity-dependent, with significant associations only seen in abdominally obese women. Protein energy intake was associated with some amino acids (Val, Phe, Tyr, and Gln) but not with the insulin resistance index. One of 12 genetic determinants of HOMA-IR, a variant in GCKR, was significantly associated with 12 metabolites.

"Metabolic signatures extending beyond obesity and lipid abnormalities reflected the degree of insulin resistance evidenced in young, normoglycemic adults with sex-specific fingerprints," Würtz and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles Recommended Nursing Articles

Dogs as Pets, Visitors, Therapists and Assistants
Home Healthcare Nurse, November/December 2014
Free access will expire on January 5, 2015.


Tracheostomy Care
Nursing2014 Critical Care, November 2014
Free access will expire on December 22, 2014.


Effective management of ARDS
The Nurse Practitioner, 13December 2014
Free access will expire on December 22, 2014.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events