African-Americans Have More Severe Sclerosis Complications

Complications related to the type of autoantibody and severity of interstitial lung disease

FRIDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- African-American patients with systemic sclerosis have more severe complications than Caucasian patients, and these complications are related to the type of autoantibody and severity of lung disease, according to a study published online May 10 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Virginia Steen, M.D., from the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and colleagues examined the demographic and disease features of African-American and Caucasian patients with systemic sclerosis, seen between 1972 and 2007. Severe disease was determined by the Medsger Disease Severity Scale.

The researchers found that the anti-topoisomerase, anti-U1RNP, and anti-U3RNP autoantibodies were more likely to be found among African-American patients. Compared with Caucasian patients with these antibodies, African-American patients had more frequent and more severe pulmonary fibrosis and decreased survival. In African-American patients with anti-U1RNP, pulmonary fibrosis was more severe, but did not correlate with the survival difference between African-Americans and Caucasians. Anti-U3RNP correlated with more severe gastrointestinal involvement in African-Americans.

"African-Americans with systemic sclerosis have more severe disease complications than Caucasians which is associated with both the type of autoantibody and their severity of interstitial lung disease," the authors write. "Hopefully early aggressive intervention in all African-Americans with interstitial lung disease will improve outcomes."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles

Debunking Three Rape Myths
Journal of Forensic Nursing, October/December 2014
Expires: 12/31/2016 CE:2.5 $24.95


Drug updates and approvals: 2014 in review
The Nurse Practitioner, 13December 2014
Expires: 12/31/2016 CE:3 $27.95


Can Food Processing Enhance Cancer Protection?
Nutrition Today, September/October 2014
Expires: 10/31/2016 CE:2 $21.95


More CE Articles

Subscribe to Recommended CE

Recommended Nursing Articles Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events