Sex Influences Survival in Esophageal Cancer

Better esophageal cancer-specific survival for women with locoregional, metastatic cancer

WEDNESDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Sex is an independent prognostic factor for patients with locoregional esophageal cancer (LEC) and metastatic esophageal cancer (MEC), according to a study published online May 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Pierre Bohanes, M.D., of the Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles, and colleagues utilized Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data from 1973 to 2007 to identify 13,603 patients with MEC and 26,848 patients with LEC to investigate the association between sex and survival in patients with esophageal cancer.

The researchers found that, in multivariate analysis, women with MEC and LEC had significantly longer esophageal cancer-specific survival (ECSS) than men (hazard ratio [HR], 0.949 [P = 0.029] and 0.920 [P < 0.001], respectively). There was no difference seen in ECSS for women and men with adenocarcinomas, after accounting for age and histology. Compared with men, women younger than 55 and aged 55 years or older with squamous LEC had longer ESCC (HR, 0.896 [P = 0.081] and 0.905 [P < 0.001]). Compared with men, women younger than age 55 years with squamous cell MEC also had longer ECSS (HR, 0.823; P = 0.011).

"Sex is an independent prognostic factor for patients with LEC or MEC," the authors write. "As secondary hypotheses, in comparison with men, women age 55 years or older with squamous cell LEC and women younger than age 55 years with squamous cell MEC have a significantly better outcome. These last two findings need further validation."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles

Blunt Chest Trauma
Journal of Trauma Nursing, November/December 2014
Expires: 12/31/2016 CE:2 $21.95


The School Age Child with Congenital Heart Disease
MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, January/February 2015
Expires: 2/28/2017 CE:2.5 $24.95


Understanding multiple myeloma
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, January/February 2015
Expires: 2/28/2017 CE:2 $21.95


More CE Articles

Subscribe to Recommended CE

Recommended Nursing Articles

Comprehensive Care: Looking Beyond the Presenting Problem
Journal of Christian Nursing, January/March 2015
Free access will expire on March 2, 2015.


Pain and Alzheimer dementia: A largely unrecognized problem
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, January/February 2015
Free access will expire on February 16, 2015.


Glycemic control in hospitalized patients
Nursing2015 Critical Care, January 2015
Free access will expire on February 16, 2015.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events