Low-Glucose Suspend Function in Insulin Pumps Deemed Safe

Findings based on overnight events with two-hour suspension with no adverse outcomes

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Sensor-augmented pump therapy with a low-glucose suspend (LGS) function appears to be safe for patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online May 14 in Diabetes Care.

Trang T. Ly, M.B.B.S., from the University of Western Australia in Perth, and colleagues analyzed data from a cohort of participants with type 1 diabetes using the Veo sensor-augmented pump therapy system for up to six months. The pattern of sensor glucose values with no patient intervention during and after the period of insulin suspension was determined from overnight suspend events with no patient response occurring prior to 3 a.m.

The researchers found that there were 3,128 LGS events with a median duration of 11.2 minutes, 36 percent of which occurred overnight. One hundred twenty-six events were full two-hour suspend events that occurred overnight, before 3 a.m., with no patient response. At the end of the two-hour suspend period the mean sensor glucose was 99 ± 6 mg/dL for these events. Two hours after insulin delivery resumed, the mean sensor glucose was 155 ± 10 mg/dL. The investigators noted no episodes of severe hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis.

"Analyses of sensor glucose patterns following insulin suspension activated by LGS suggest that this technology is safe and unlikely to be associated with adverse outcomes," the authors conclude.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry and Medtronic, which provided the insulin pumps and glucose sensors.

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