Anergia Prevalent in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

Anergia linked with being female, being white, bodily pain, exercise participation, comorbidities

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Anergia, or the lack of energy, is highly prevalent in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and correlates independently with several factors, including bodily pain and exercise participation, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Jonathan A. Shaffer, Ph.D., of Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues conducted a study involving 472 hospitalized patients with ACS enrolled in a prospective cohort study to evaluate the prevalence and clinical and demographic characteristics of anergia.

At least one instance of anergia was reported by 79.9 percent of patients, and 32 percent of patients met the established criteria for anergia. The researchers found that anergia correlated independently with being a woman, being white versus black, having bodily pain, participating in exercise, having current depressive disorder, and having elevated values on the Charlson Comorbidity Index, in a multivariable model.

"In conclusion, anergia is a highly prevalent syndrome in patients with ACS," the authors write. "It is distinct from depression and is associated with modifiable clinical factors such as participation in exercise and bodily pain that may be appropriate targets for intervention."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles Recommended Nursing Articles

Abdominal Pain: An Approach to a Challenging Diagnosis
AACN Advanced Critical Care, July/September 2014
Free access will expire on October 13, 2014.


HIPAA Compliance Practice Tips
Professional Case Management, July/August 2014
Free access will expire on September 29, 2014.


Follow the leader: How does “followership” influence nurse burnout?
Nursing Management, August 2014
Free access will expire on September 29, 2014.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events