Hormonal Changes at Menopause Up Abdominal Obesity

Changes account for increase in total body and abdominal fat; can be improved by estrogen

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The increase in total body fat and abdominal fat seen at menopause is due to the hormonal changes taking place, which can be improved by estrogen treatment, according to a study published in the October issue of Climacteric.

Susan R. Davis, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues reviewed the scientific and medical literature for studies examining the association between menopause and body weight and body composition.

The researchers found that changes in the hormonal environment at menopause were associated with an increase in total body fat and particularly abdominal fat. This increased weight was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease as well as reduced health-related quality of life and sexual function. The accumulation of abdominal fat could be reduced by estrogen therapy, according to animal and human studies, which correlated with reductions in overall fat mass, improvements in insulin sensitivity, and reductions in the rate of developing type 2 diabetes.

"The hormonal changes across the perimenopause substantially contribute to increased abdominal obesity which leads to additional physical and psychological morbidity," Davis and colleagues conclude. "There is strong evidence that estrogen therapy may partly prevent this menopause-related change in body composition and the associated metabolic sequelae."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles Recommended Nursing Articles

Medical Marijuana: A Hazy State of Affairs for Nurses
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, August 2014
Free access will expire on October 27, 2014.


Understanding nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nursing Made Incredibly Easy!, September/October 2014
Free access will expire on October 13, 2014.


Assessing pain in critically ill adults
Nursing2014 Critical Care, July 2014
Free access will expire on October 13, 2014.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events