AHA: Aspirin Doesn't Reduce Recurrence After First VTE

But results in significant reduction in rate of major vascular events, with improved net clinical benefit

MONDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism who complete initial anticoagulant therapy, aspirin does not reduce the recurrence of venous thromboembolism, but does correlate with a reduction in the rate of major vascular events, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2012, held from Nov. 3 to 7 in Los Angeles.

Timothy A. Brighton, M.B., B.S., from the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues conducted a randomized study involving 822 patients who had completed initial anticoagulant therapy after a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Participants were allocated to receive 100 mg daily aspirin or placebo for up to four years.

During a median of 37.2 months of follow-up, the researchers found that the annual rate of recurrence was 6.5 percent in patients assigned to placebo versus 4.8 percent among those assigned to aspirin (hazard ratio for aspirin, 0.74; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.52 to 1.05; P = 0.09). Aspirin correlated with a reduction in the rate of two prespecified secondary composite outcomes: a 34 percent reduction in the rate of venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death (P = 0.01), and a 33 percent reduction in the rate of venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, major bleeding, or death from any cause (P = 0.01). The rates of major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding episodes or serious adverse events were not significantly different between the groups.

"These results substantiate earlier evidence of a therapeutic benefit of aspirin when it is given to patients after initial anticoagulant therapy for a first episode of unprovoked venous thromboembolism," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Powered by

jQuery UI Accordion - Default functionality

For life-long learning and continuing professional development, come to Lippincott's NursingCenter.

Nursing Jobs Plus
Featured Jobs
Recommended CE Articles Recommended Nursing Articles

Dogs as Pets, Visitors, Therapists and Assistants
Home Healthcare Nurse, November/December 2014
Free access will expire on January 5, 2015.


Tracheostomy Care
Nursing2014 Critical Care, November 2014
Free access will expire on December 22, 2014.


Effective management of ARDS
The Nurse Practitioner, 13December 2014
Free access will expire on December 22, 2014.


More Recommended Articles

Subscribe to Recommended Articles

Evidence Based Practice Skin Care Network NursingCenter Quick Links What’s Trending Events