Chronic Kidney Disease
An American Journal of Nursing (AJN)  article series

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. More than 400,000 Americans have end-stage renal disease--a number that is projected to reach 2.24 million people by 2030 if we don't do more to prevent it from occurring and manage CKD better once it does occur. Every nurse can play a significant role in the early detection of CKD and its treatment to prevent it from progressing to kidney failure. The American Journal of Nursing (AJN) is publishing a series of articles designed to provide nurses in all settings and specialties with evidence-based information on this important health problem Supported in part by a grant from the National Kidney Foundation, the bimonthly continuing education series consists of six articles written by experts in the field and includes practical information to demonstrates the critical role nurses can play in helping to improve outcomes for patients at increased risk for kidney disease.

Topics addressed in the series include risk factors for CKD, techniques for screening, complications, pharmacological considerations, cardiovascular risk factors and complications, adherence and self-management of prevention and treatment, and best practices for patients beginning replacement therapy.

Links:

Articles

  Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, September 2006

  Self-Management of Chronic Kidney Disease
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, October 2005

  Pharmacology and CKD
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, September 2005

  Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, June 2005

  Editorial: The Tragedy of Chronic Kidney Disease: It's time to admit our inadequacies
AJN, American Journal of Nursing, February 2005