Clinical Nurse Specialist Week 2017

Posted: 8/29/2017 10:24:19 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Inspired Nurses Calendar 2017: A Better Life

Lippincott NursingCenter.com is partnering with Lippincott Solutions to bring you an inspired nurse’s story every month. Here is August’s nurse story, “A Better Life.”
 
A Better Life
Helene Vossos, DNP, PMHNP-BC, ANP
Stewart Marchman ACT Behavioral Services
 
August-2017.jpgAs nurses, we must recognize how vulnerable mental health patients often feel, which can impact their access to mental health services.
 
As a mental health nurse, I participated in an "Open Access Model" to "walk in" appointments in an outpatient clinic that improved access to mental health services from 54% up to 94%. Many of our inpatient, outpatient, home health care and homeless patients lack communication skills and resources, and all nurses can help make a difference when coordinating their care. As a case study, we talk about Miguel, who is a 32-year-old immigrant from Puerto Rico, homeless in Florida, has a history of schizophrenia and is a new resident. He came to the states by boat, "for a better life." His history includes three previous self-inflicted stabbings to his abdomen and chest when he was out of medication and when "the voices were loud and commanding."
 
Historically Miguel was in contact with emergency department nurses, medical-surgical nurses, OR nurses, case manager nurses, mental health nurses and nurse practitioners for the past three years. All of these nurses are "mental health nurses" by proxy, as they all touched his life, saving him and helping him to maintain stability and get the health care services he needs by providing "walk-in" status during open-access for mental health services, and have provided a translator as well as additional assistance in maintaining appropriate medication and continuing outpatient services. Nurses save lives in all ways of collaboration, caring and research translated into clinical practice!
 
 
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Posted: 8/28/2017 9:31:48 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Inspired Nurses Calendar 2017: Meant to be a Nurse

Lippincott NursingCenter.com is partnering with Lippincott Solutions to bring you an inspired nurse’s story every month. Here is July's nurse story, “Meant to be a Nurse.” 
 
Meant to be a Nurse
Adriana Pirez, BSN, RN
Saint Luke's Cornwall Hospital, Medical/Surgical Unit
 
July-2017.pngAll my life I've wanted to be a nurse. The inspiration was in my family, as my aunt Mercedes was the nurse coordinator for a private hospital in my native country of Uruguay. She married a doctor and one of their sons became a doctor too.

On Sunday's when we would gather at grandma's house, as a little girl, I remember hearing conversations about new drugs in the market to fight illnesses, and many stories my cousin would tell about his experiences as a new doctor doing an internship in a local hospital ED. I was mesmerized by their stories, their intelligence and mostly for their love and dedication to their professions. It took me a long time as a woman, a mother, and a wife, in my forties to realize that that dream of being a vocational nurse could be possible here in the U.S. So, after working for years in different hospitals as a unit secretary and a registrar for the Emergency Department, I enrolled in a nursing program at my local community college.

Finally, after so many struggles, lack of support and discrimination from some professors for me speaking with an accent and being different, I maintained a positive attitude, and transferred to a new nursing program in a prestigious Christian College in Rockland County, NY. In 2013, I graduated with honors. It wasn’t always easy, but I would do it all over again – nine years, three colleges and a huge debt in student loans.
Today, I work in my local hospital, the one where the nurses in that ED inspired me even more. I love the smiles on my patients when they see me coming on my second day of my shifts. Their smiles and their trust in my care is the greatest support I can get, knowing that nursing is in my heart and in my Christian soul, and that I was truly meant to be a nurse.

To see all 2016-2017 stories or to share an inspiring story of your own about being a nurse, or how you were inspired by another, and enter to win prizes, visit http://lippincottsolutions.com/inspirednurses.  Be sure to check our blog every month for a new inspired nurse’s story.
 
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Posted: 7/29/2017 6:01:23 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Summer Reading for Nurses

summer-reading-for-nurses.pngSummer is a great time to catch up on reading - the days are longer, some of us take some time off from work, and things seem to slow down a bit. If you're like me, you've got a list of reading recommendations from friends and colleagues that you've been planning to read "someday." Well, as I prepare for a little beach time, I'm organizing and prioritizing my reading list. Have you read any of these titles? Or are any on your to-read list? 


For students and new nurses transitioning to practice...

Anatomy of a Super Nurse: The Ultimate Guide to Becoming Nursey
Kati Kleber, BSN, RN, CCRN
This is a revised version of Becoming Nursey: From Code Blues to Code Browns, How to Care for Your Patients and Yourself, which I’ve read several times. I look forward to catching up on the new additions that Kleber added to this must-read for students and new nurses. 

Intensive Care; The Story of a Nurse
Echo Heron
As a new RN in the ICU, I can remember reading this book and its sequel, Condition Critical; The Story of a Nurse Continues, many times! These true stories that are recounted in this book shed a light on what is happening every day in the lives of nurses and the patients we care for. 
 

For inspiration...

Reflections on Nursing
American Journal of Nursing
These personal accounts from actual nurses are inspiring and demonstrate the true work that nurses do every day. Reading these stories will help you remember why you became a nurse. 

Nightingale's Vision: Advancing the Nursing Profession Beyond 2020
Sue Johnson, PhD, RN, NE-BC
Just released, this book features a look at the status of each recommendation from the 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Future of Nursing report. As “an essential reference to guide nurses in the advancement of their profession in the next decade and beyond,” it sounds like a must-read for all of us. 

 

Strictly for pleasure...

My Sister’s Keeper
Jodi Picoult
This one is recommended by a nurse friend, and while I remember being interested when this movie was released, I never did see it. Picoult is the author of 28 novels, and I am planning on picking up this one, and maybe a few others, soon.

Firefly Lane
Kristin Hannah
This is my favorite book and I’ve read it several times – and I will be bringing it along on my vacation again! A tale of friendship – and its ups and downs – that may remind you of some relationships in your own life. There is a sequel, Fly Away, that you’ll want to check out too!

What other books do you recommend? 
 
Posted: 7/23/2017 11:44:02 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Inspired Nurses Calendar 2017: Hair and Hospice

Lippincott NursingCenter.com is partnering with Lippincott Solutions to bring you an inspired nurse’s story every month. Here is June’s nurse story, “Hair and Hospice.” Enjoy!
 
Hair and Hospice
Marcy Hof, RN
Hilton Head Hospital

hair-and-hospice.pngThirty-two years ago when I was 21, I got my cosmetology license and began working in a salon. My father had been diagnosed with malignant melanoma and went from hospital to hospital for different treatments and a clinical trial. It was at that time that I realized how valuable nurses are to the world, and how many different aspects of nursing there are. When my dad got to the point where he needed hospice care, I was the only one who could lift him or clean him up. He would tell people to go away and let me help them because I was stronger than my mom and sister. It was only after he passed away that I went to nursing school. I have been an RN for 24 years and today my daughter is in nursing school too! My father would have been so proud!! It is a very rewarding, frustrating, sad, and interesting career that I am glad I pursued!
 
To see all 2016-2017 stories or to share an inspiring story of your own about being a nurse, or how you were inspired by another, and enter to win prizes, visit http://lippincottsolutions.com/inspirednurses.  Be sure to check our blog every month for a new inspired nurse’s story.
 
 
 

 

Posted: 6/22/2017 8:02:15 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


20 Years of Lippincott NursingCenter [Video]

LNC-20th-Ann-logoThis month, we celebrate the 20th anniversary of Lippincott NursingCenter! In June of 1997, the website formerly known as AJNOnline became Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com. This look back at our evolution has been eye-opening [credit to the Internet Archive, Wayback Machine]. As a clinical editor on the NursingCenter team since 2002, there is much that I’d forgotten, as well as some previous features that are now inspiring me with new ideas!

Originally launched in 1993 with grant funding from the Department of Health & Human Services, Division of Nursing, NursingCenter.com was one of the very first Internet sites devoted exclusively to nursing. The site began as AJNNet, an electronic bulletin board system (BBS) for delivering continuing education to nurses in medically under-served areas. In January 1995, the BBS evolved into a full website called AJNOnline, the first website to deliver full-text nursing journals (including full-text versions of the American Journal of Nursing and The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing.)

In June of 1997, the site was renamed Lippincott's NursingCenter with more journals and continuing education offerings than any other nursing site. As more even more nursing resources and references were added, the site was completely redesigned and relaunched several times, always with the goal to be the most comprehensive online nursing portal. In April 2000, NursingCenter merged with SpringNet, Springhouse Corporation's award-winning website.

After several more iterations and redesigns, we’ve come to be known as Lippincott NursingCenter. Today, NursingCenter.com continues to expand, offering a growing library of cutting-edge original content to help nurses and students on their professional journeys.

Please join me on a little video journey through our history!
 
 

Twenty years ago, when the web was just in its infancy, Lippincott NursingCenter emerged as a premier online resource for nurses. Our authoritative content, created by nurses for nurses, continues to set us apart as an online nursing resource. We are proud of our exclusive content – enewsletters, nursing tip cards and mnemonics, infographics, and blog – that keeps nurses up-to-date clinically and professionally. And our portfolio of resources has grown to include over 6,000 peer reviewed articles from over 70 trusted Lippincott journals and more than 1,900 continuing education activities. Thank you for being a valuable member of our nursing community. 
 
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Posted: 6/9/2017 7:20:31 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Inspired Nurses Calendar 2017: Through the Stomach to the Heart

Lippincott NursingCenter.com is partnering with Lippincott Solutions to bring you an inspired nurse’s story every month. These stories are filled with heroic tales created by nurses, for nurses, and were chosen from hundreds of submissions from nurses around the United States. These nurse storytellers are compassionate, informative, and inspiring – we hope you enjoy them!

To kick this off, we are beginning with May’s nurse story, “Through the Stomach to the Heart.” Read the full story below.

Through the Stomach to the Heart
Simone Cheong, Magnet Project Coordinator
West Kendall Baptist Hospital

In a previous role working on an inpatient medical-surgical unit, I had an extraordinary opportunity to make a difference in the life of one patient. We had been caring for a patient who had worked for a cruise line and had become very ill, requiring prolonged hospitalization and medical therapy before being released to return home. He was from India and had no family or friends.

through-the-stomach-to-the-heart.pngThe staff explained that the patient was not eating and was losing weight. His mood was also depressed. The physical ailment included wound healing, and with insufficient nutrients, the body is slowed in its healing process. Although the dieticians tried their best to make accommodations, he was still not eating well, so I took it upon myself to go to a local Indian grocery store and buy some Indian food items. With the physician's permission, I proceeded to cook and provide him with Indian meals and snacks. The patient was thankful and overwhelmed with emotion, and over the course of his hospitalization, he began eating better, improving his nutritional intake along with his mood as well. He was subsequently released after several weeks. 

Over the years, the patient has called back to the nursing unit asking to thank me again and give me updates on his health status. That is what nursing is all about. Going above and beyond to meet the needs of the patient.

Through your strength, courage, and compassion, these stories will help to illustrate just how crucial nursing is to optimal patient care and the art of healing. Help pay it forward and inspire others on just what it means to be a nurse.

To see all 2016-2017 stories or to share an inspiring story of your own about being a nurse, or how you were inspired by another, and enter to win prizes, visit http://lippincottsolutions.com/inspirednurses. Be sure to check our blog every month for a new inspired nurse’s story.
 
Posted: 5/26/2017 11:28:47 AM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


ASHPE Awards 2017: Wolters Kluwer wins big!

 
ashpe-award_2017.bmpWolters Kluwer continues to shine in the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE) awards! In 2016, Wolters Kluwer won 24 times, and this year, we exceeded that amount and won 27 awards across 20 categories.

We are particularly excited to announce that Lippincott NursingCenter.com won three awards this year. NursingCenter is a proud part of Wolters Kluwer’s Lippincott journal portfolio. The award-winning nursing journals from Wolters Kluwer are listed below. For the full list of award-winners, please visit ASHPE’s website.

GOLD SILVER BRONZE
 
Posted: 5/17/2017 1:35:22 PM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


If only I had said something…

empty-bench.pngI walk into the room and look at the figure of a 20-year-old college student lying in the bed after a deliberate overdose, intubated and on a ventilator, the steady rhythm of the machine making her chest rise and fall and the steady beeping of the heart monitor somewhat reassuring that my patient was still alive. The parents sitting by her bedside with tears streaming down their faces. The mother speaks to me, “If only I had said something. I thought it was only stress of being in college and having to take final exams; if only I had said something…”.

If only I had said something…these are words none of us wants to say or hear, but too often this is exactly what happens. Frankly, I’ve heard those words too many times in my professional practice. How many times have you wondered if someone you know has a mental health disorder? Maybe, you wonder if you have a disorder? When we look at the statistics, the impact of mental health issues —which is defined as any mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder, excluding developmental and substance use disorders — is sobering. Mental health issues affect 21.2% of adult females and 24.3% of adult males, per the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH, 2016).  None of us are immune to being touched by someone who has a mental health disorder. From generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and so on, we have all known someone or taken care of someone who has a mental health issue. Perhaps the greatest issue we face is being able to recognize when someone needs professional help or when we need professional help.

Although we, as health care professionals, recognize that managing mental health disorders is as important as managing any other disorder, the stigma in the community that mental health issues are a sign of weakness or that the person can snap out of it, still exist. We must take an active role in educating the community on when a person may have a mental health issue and not just feeling anxious or feeling down about something that happened in their life. People who entertain risky behaviors, such as prescription drug misuse, exercise extremes, compulsive buying, and risky sex may have an underlying mental illness (http://mentalhealthamerica.net).

The theme of Nurses Week is Nursing: The Balance of Mind, Body, and Spirit and mental health is certainly a part of that initiative. May is also Mental Health Month. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is leading the initiative on mental health awareness and management by outlining objectives to define mechanisms of complex behaviors, recognizing those who have mental health issues, and when intervention is necessary, and striving for mental health illness prevention.

As nurses, we must speak up when we suspect someone may have a mental health issue and encourage that person to seek professional help.  We must have the courage to speak up even if that person is our colleague, in our family, or even ourselves.  No more should we hear, “If I had only said something…”.
 
Anne Dabrow Woods, DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC, FAAN
Chief Nurse
Health Learning, Research & Practice
Wolters Kluwer


 
Posted: 5/12/2017 8:06:27 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Are You Soaring Spiritually?

bird-soaring.jpgSpirituality is a vague concept for many nurses—especially when our primary focus is implementing physical, scientific interventions. As holistic caregivers, we believe nursing care should be for body, mind, and spirit. Our personal spirituality, however, is easy to ignore. Some of us don’t think about our spirituality until we are turned upside down by a life crisis. But over time, even without crisis, if we don’t care for our spirits we will suffer consequences.
 
Paying attention to personal spirituality is especially important for nurses. Researchers and spiritual care experts have found that offering good spiritual care requires the nurse to attend to his or her own spirituality (makes sense, right?) (Baldacchino, 2011; Taylor, 2009; 2011). Furthermore, we regularly experience spiritual distress in our work, which leads to weariness, depression, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Moreover, being spiritually healthy – soaring spiritually – feels better than spiritual malnourishment. In fact, it feels great!
 
What is spiritual health? Our spirit is the core of our being, a characteristic of all humanity. While our spirit is accessed through our mind, spiritual health is more than mental health. Spirituality involves the ultimate search for meaning and understanding of the sacred or transcendent. It expresses a universal human capacity to transcend ourselves and connect with God, other people, and the world around us. It is through spirituality that we find self-fulfillment, peace, and meaning in life and suffering (Lepherd, 2015). A frequently used assessment of spiritual health is the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS), a general indicator of perceived well-being and spiritual quality of life, with subscales that assess Religious Well-Being (one's relationship with God or “higher power”), and Existential Well-Being (one's sense of life purpose and life satisfaction) (Bufford, Paloutzian, & Ellison, 1991).
 
What helps nurses’ spirituality? Recently, researchers in Iran found a positive correlation between nurses’ clinical competence and spiritual health, and professional ethics and spiritual health (Tabriz, Orooji, Bikverdi, & Taghiabad, 2017). A U.S. chaplaincy department conducted a randomized controlled study of a spiritual retreat for nurses. Nurses who did the spiritual retreat scored higher at 1 and 6 months on the SWBS and Daily Spiritual Experience Scale than nurses with no retreat (Bay, Ivy, & Terry, 2010). The ancient text of Proverbs in the Tanach (Hebrew Bible) and Christian Holy Bible speak about what makes for spiritual health (kind words, trustworthy words, humility, relationship with God, clean heart), versus a crushed, broken, or weighed down spirit (i.e., Psalm 51; Proverbs 15:4, 16:19-24, 17:22, 18:14, 29:23). Wise king Solomon wrote, “Keep your heart, for from it flow the springs of life” (Proverbs 4:23, ESV).
 
How are you caring for your spirit? Do you engage in spiritual renewal? A renewal experience is doing something you enjoy like a walk in nature or a hobby. I find renewal exercising with friends and playing the piano. For nurses of faith, attending a gathering in your worship tradition can be (should be!) a renewal experience.
 
Meet regularly with friends who will listen to and support you. Two months ago, I reluctantly joined a small group from my church to share time, meals, and service projects. I expected this to be work. To my surprise, even though I can’t attend regularly, the group is renewing me. This week, a young man shared his struggles with me, and I shared mine. He texted me today saying he was praying for me, and that “your absence is felt and we cherish when you are able to attend.” I felt spiritually connected, that someone of like mind cares for me. That is spiritual renewal in the struggle of life.
 
Below are ideas for spiritual self-care. As we think about balancing body, mind, and spirit during this year’s 2017 National Nurses Week, take time to care for your spirit.
 

Ideas to Help Your Spirit Soar

  1. Daily quiet time with personal reflection or meditation on spiritual readings.
  2. Read enlightening materials—spiritual readings (i.e., Bible) or devotional books.
  3. Plan for times of rest and take your mind off work, off problems, and relax (Sabbath). Consider a one-day or longer “guided spiritual retreat” at a retreat center near you.
  4. Attend gatherings of your faith tradition.
  5. Spend time in prayer, talking with the Mystery many call God.
  6. Join a “share group” of people with whom you have a common interest.
  7. Do special things you enjoygo to a greenhouse, art gallery, antique mall, camping or on a picnic, take in a movie with a friend. Be creative!
  8. Engage in regular physical exercise (walk/run alone or with a friend; join an exercise group).
  9. Conduct a spiritual self-assessment; heighten awareness of your spirituality (Beckman, Boxley-Harges, Bruick-Sorge, & Salmon, 2007).
  10. Engage in spiritual direction with a spiritual director or companion consistent with your beliefs (http://www.sdiworld.org).

References:
Baldacchino, D. R. (2011). Teaching on spiritual care: The perceived impact on qualified nurses. Nurse Education in Practice, 11(1), 47–53. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2010.06.008
Bay, P. S., Ivy, S. S., & Terry, C. L. (2010). The effect of spiritual retreat on nurses’ spirituality: A randomized controlled study. Holistic Nursing Practice, 24(3), 125-133.
Beckman, S., Boxley-Harges, S., Bruick-Sorge, C., & Salmon, B. (2007). Five strategies that heighten nurses’ awareness of spirituality to impact client care. Holistic Nursing Practice, 21(3), 135-139.
Bufford, R. K., Paloutzian, R. F., & Ellison, C. W. (1991). Norms for the Spiritual Well-Being Scale. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 19(1), 56-70.
Lepherd, L. (2015). Spirituality: Everyone has it, but what is it? International Journal of Nursing Practice, 21(5), 566–574. doi: 10.1111/ijn.12285
Tabriz, E. R.., Orooji, A. Bikverdi, M. & Taghiabadl, B. A. (2017). Investigation of clinical competence and its relationship with professional ethics and spiritual health in nurses.   Health, Spirituality and Medical Ethics, 4(1), 2-9.
Taylor, E. J. (2009). What do I say? Talking with patients about spirituality. West Conshohocken, PA: Templeton.
Taylor, E. J. (2011). Spiritual care: Evangelism at the bedside? Journal of Christian Nursing, 28(4), 194-202. doi: 10.1097/CNJ.0b013e31822b494d
 
Kathy Schoonover-Shoffner, PhD, RN
National Director, Nurses Christian Fellowship USA
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Christian Nursing
 
Posted: 5/11/2017 7:56:52 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Inspiration


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