Wolters Kluwer nursing journals sweep ASHPE awards

ashpe-award_2016.jpgIn 2016, Wolters Kluwer’s nursing journals won 24 times in the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE) awards! Our winners were in the Editorial, Graphic and Online categories, and we are especially excited that Lippincott NursingCenter.com won gold for Best Use of Social Media for National Nurses Week 2015.  

The award-winning nursing journals from Wolters Kluwer are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you! For the full list of award-winners, visit ASHPE’s website

Publication of the Year: Emergency Medicine News

GOLD
Best Feature Article: American Journal of Nursing (Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report)
Best Legislative/Government Article: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (Learning From New York City)
Best Use of Social Media: Lippincott NursingCenter.com
Best Cover Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (After the Trenches: Spiritual Care of Veterans)
Best Peer Reviewed Journal: American Journal of Nursing

SILVER
Best Feature Article Series: Nursing2016 (Pregnancy in Crisis)
Best New Department: Nursing Management (Care Transitions)
Best Feature Article: Nursing made Incredibly Easy! (The truth about human trafficking)
Best Profile: Neurology Now (A leader takes on brain disease)
Best Peer-Reviewed Journal: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Best Special Supplement, Annual or Buyer’s Guide: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Soft-Tissue Fillers and Neuromodulators: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives

BRONZE
Best News Coverage: Neurology Today (AAN's Call for Repeal of MOC Part IV Awaits Action from Credentialing Board)
Best Regular Department: Neurology Now (For the Caregiver)
Best Commentary: The Hearing Journal (Do or die for hearing aid industry
Best Legislative/Government Article: The Nurse Practitioner (27th Annual Legislative Update: Advancements continue for APRN practice)
Best Blog: American Journal of Nursing (Off the charts)
Best Cover Photo: American Journal of Nursing (Faces of Caring: Nurses at Work)
Best Feature Article: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Original Research: CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing (Social Media: The Key to Health Information Access for 18- to 30-Year-Old College Students)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Computer-Generated: Journal of Christian Nursing (Nursing for the Kingdom of God)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing (Womb Outsourcing: Commercial Surrogacy in India)
Best Website/Online Presence of a Publication: PRS Global Open

 
Posted: 5/17/2016 8:28:55 AM by Cara Deming | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


For whom do you care – patients or clients?

patients-or-clients.jpgThis topic came up a couple of times recently – once, in a conversation with nurse faculty preparing courses for undergraduate students; the second, during the Keynote Address at the Dermatology Nurses’ Association Convention. The faculty members were questioning which term – patient or client – is appropriate for use in the academic setting. In her Keynote, Everyday Ethics for Nurses in Everyday Practice, Leah Curtin, ScD(h), RN, FAAN touched on this topic and even dug deeper into the roots of each of the words, encouraging the audience to make their own decisions regarding the appropriateness of each term. 

Here’s a closer look at the terms ‘patients’ and ‘clients.’ 

Patient
  • Comes from the Latin word, patior, which means ‘to suffer’
  • Defined as ‘one who suffers’
Client
  • Comes from the Latin word, clinare, which means ‘to lean’
  • Defined as ‘one who is the recipient of a professional service’
Based on the word roots and definitions, some may feel that the term ‘patient’ indicates a hierarchical relationship, where the term ‘client’ signifies a more collaborative relationship. It’s interesting then that many authors, clinician and non-clinician, use the terms interchangeably or even simultaneously. For example, “patient or client self-report measures” or “patient/client safety” is often found in the literature. However, we know that the written word is not how we speak and I’ve yet to hear a colleague ask “Is the patient/client NPO?” or say “The patient/client needs a new IV inserted.” 

I was surprised during a search on this topic, to find that this is not a new discussion. In a 1997 article from the Canadian Medical Association, Peter C. Wing, MB, ChB found that use of the term “client” was documented as early as 1970. He also shares results from his survey of 101 people attending an ambulatory back-pain clinic; almost ¾ of those surveyed stated a preference for ‘patient’ rather than ‘client.’

Personally, I can’t imagine referring to a person in my care as a client. It just sounds unnatural to me. Which do you prefer? 
 
POLL QUESTION

For whom do you care – patients or clients?

 
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References
Farlex, Inc. (2016, April 8). Retrieved from The Free Medical Dictionary: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/
Wing, P. (1997). Patient or client? If in doubt, ask. Canadian Medical Association, 287-289.

 
Posted: 4/13/2016 9:18:24 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 9 comments

Categories: Inspiration


For me, every month is Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Awareness Month – a patient’s perspective

By Kim Fryling-Resare

I was going to put together a collection of information and statistics to share about multiple sclerosis, but as I started to write, it became more about what I personally do to raise MS awareness. My hope is that my story will give insight and shed some light onto a patient’s perspective. I feel like understanding is one of the keys to better support and care for patients living with a chronic illness.   

multiple-sclerosis-awareness-month.pngMarch is MS Awareness Month – a topic near and dear to my heart. I’ve been living with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis since 2003 and I try to live my life every day as if it is “MS Awareness Day.” 

Unfortunately, I’m not a scientist who will discover a cure. I’m not a neurologist or a nurse who will treat patients. And lastly, I’m not fortunate enough to be rolling in money that I could fund clinical trials or research studies. So what can I do to raise awareness about MS? 

I can SUPPORT.
Whenever I hear about someone who is newly-diagnosed, or someone who may be struggling with the disease, I’m always ready to hand out my phone number or email address. I know all too well that it can be a continuous struggle, but I want them to know they are not alone. There is hope, and they will get through this battle learning strategies to improve life and ultimately discovering how truly strong they are.

I can stay POSITIVE.
I went through all of the typical emotions after my MS diagnosis, and I had to go through the grieving process and let go of my life, or at least my perceived life, before MS. Now, I’m actually thankful for MS. I have let go of a lot of toxic people and negativity, and I try not to sweat the small stuff. I have chosen to take the path where I value life and take little to nothing for granted. 

I can EDUCATE.
I have always been very open about living with multiple sclerosis. I love shocking people with the fact that I have MS. I encourage questions and enjoy sharing my experiences and knowledge. There is a lot of misinformation out there and people tend to have such misconceptions about what MS looks like, and what it means to live with MS. It is such a varying disease that presents so differently and affects people in so many different ways. 

I can LIVE fully.
I live the best life that I can with MS, and along the way, I try to educate others on what MS is and what it means to people battling it every day, every month, every year. Raising awareness for MS and living fully is my way of advocating and giving back to the MS community. 

kim-fryling-resare.pngI will never give up HOPE.
I have this silly personal belief that if I say something, or believe something long enough, it will manifest and become reality. So…There will be a cure for MS. There will be a cure for MS. There will be a cure for MS…

To continue raising awareness, I’m marking my 13th year living with MS by participating in my first half marathon this summer. 13 years, 13.1 miles! Never give up!
 
Please use these free resources on NursingCenter to learn more about MS and to help spread awareness by sharing with your colleagues, patients, and the public.
 

The Journal of Neuroscience Nursing and the Journal of Infusion Nursing are both honoring MS Awareness Month by offering subscription discounts in March. Enter promotion code, WFS115GN, and take 40% off the subscription price for either journal.


 
Posted: 3/8/2016 8:30:26 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Diseases & Conditions Inspiration


Time management tips for busy nurses

During these busy days, time management is a challenge for many people. If you have a career where your schedule is frequently changing, the challenge becomes even more pronounced. Maybe you even flip-flop your nights and days sometimes or juggle teaching or taking classes on top of your already busy schedule. The point is, time management skills are essential to keep us rested, healthy, and productive!

Here are some top tips to help you manage your time effectively. time management tips for nurses
  • Write it down. Use a calendar – paper or electronic – to keep track of all your appointments and responsibilities in one place.
  • Stay focused. When at work, focus on work. When at home, focus on home.
  • Break it down. Divide large tasks into smaller items that are more manageable.
  • Declutter. Clear your work area. Whether it’s a desk, medication cart, or bedside table, don’t let excess clutter take your attention away from what you are doing.
  • Delegate. Proper delegation and teamwork are time management wins for you and your colleagues.
  • Set aside time to answer messages. Answer phone calls, texts, and emails at convenient times, rather than allowing those rings and beeps to distract from your current task.
 What other time management tips would you add to this list?
 

Related Reading


 

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Posted: 2/29/2016 8:44:39 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Maintaining Work-Life Balance [Infographic]

It can get complicated to juggle our personal and professional lives. This infographic will help you take a closer look at what you need to do to keep yourself healthy – physically, mentally, and emotionally. 
 

Maintaining Work-Life Balance in Nursing

Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead!  

More Resources:
Meeting My Professional Requirements [Infographic]
Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing [Infographic]

 

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:

Posted: 2/11/2016 10:18:12 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 9 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


Setting and meeting goals

The secret to getting ahead is getting started ~ Mark Twain

setting and meeting goals in nursingAs nurses, there are many different roads we take on our journey to where we are now professionally. We all have different starting points and are currently at different places on this professional road. Similarly, there is immense variation in how we set and achieve our goals. There are volumes of literature on goal setting and achievement and the methods are not a one-size-fits-all formula. The key to successful goal management is figuring out what works for you, being honest with yourself about what your current and future goals are and coming up with a plan to achieve what you set out to do. Personality, life circumstances, and family-work balance all play roles in how we set and achieve goals, as well as our motivation to accomplish them.

Personally, I began my professional career in medical research with a degree in the sciences. I quickly determined that I wanted to interact with patients rather than study them from inside a room (my project involved taking measurements on carotid arteries [recorded loops on VHS] – in a dark room – as part of a cardiovascular research project). When I came to this realization, I organized my first five-year plan with a goal of becoming a nurse. I applied to and was accepted to a nursing program. I went on to receive my BSN and subsequently my MSN, which I completed in 2001 with the help of a National Health Service Corp Scholarship. I began working at a Federally Qualified Healthcare Center as a Family Nurse Practitioner. and after fulfilling my commitment to the scholarship, I was able to do a loan repayment program at the same health center. Within five years, I had all of my undergraduate and nursing loans payed off. Using the five-year framework allows for short and long-term goal setting with some flexibility factored in for the unexpected. While I personally work better with this flexibility, others may find more success with a stricter plan; this is where we need to be honest with ourselves and come up with a method that works best.

Fast forward eight years. Following a job transition, I was offered a position working in an ICU as a nurse practitioner. Although this was not in my original plans, and well out of my comfort zone, the opportunity was one that I could not pass up and presented an exciting new challenge. Around this same time, the Consensus model for APRN regulation: Licensure, accreditation, certification, and education (APRN Consensus Work Group, 2008) was released. This landmark publication for NP practice essentially recommended that NPs practice in the discipline/setting for which they were educated and certified. Although this seems straight forward, NP history is one whose roots began in primary care with evolution to the acute care setting. Educational programs for acute care NPs were introduced later in the historical timeline, and the fact is that there are many primary care NPs practicing in hospitals. So now, with no plans to leave the ICU, my current five-year plan includes completion of a post-master’s program to become certified as an adult-gerontological acute care nurse practitioner. This was an adjustment I needed to make, but it is a great opportunity to improve my skills and my job performance.
reach for the stars in nursing
I mentioned the flexibility to my plans earlier. There was an approximately five-year period in my life (i.e. when my children were infants) when I struggled to keep up with my plan, or rather, I had no plan! Memories of these years include crunching to find online CME and overnight expressing my license applications and sometimes struggles to just get through the day. For me, despite being a competent nurse at work, I found it overwhelming trying to figure out parenting and how to be a working mom. The learning curve of parenting and navigating the work-life balance was steep. Eventually, I was able to get back on track. Moving forward, I have reset my five-year plan once again (it’s a moving target). I hope to complete the acute care NP program in December 2016 then take and pass (fingers crossed) the exam in the spring of 2017. After that, I may try to teach, or possibly consider a DNP or PhD program.

I have not done extensive research from an academic or literature perspective on goal setting, but I do know that there are many successful methods for those that have difficulty with a flexible plan or prefer a more established format. For myself, it has been immensely helpful to take time, every so often, to reflect on where I am and where I would like to be. NursingCenter’s blog post, My Nursing Care Plan for 2016, provides an excellent resource for some of our requirements to keep up our professional obligations. Because in addition to our professional goal, there are tasks that we need to complete to stay current and licensed.

How do you like to set and achieve your goals? Has anyone found a more standard goal setting process that works for you? Please share your experiences with us!
 
Megan Doble, MSN, RN, CRNP
 
Reference:
APRN Consensus Work Group & the National Council of State Board of Nursing APRN Advisory Group. (July 7, 2008). Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, & Education. 
Posted: 2/9/2016 9:35:45 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 6 comments

Categories: InspirationEducation & Career


Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing [Infographic]

Lifelong learning is essential for your professional development and to ensure evidence-based patient care and improve outcomes. Use this infographic to help you stay on track and meet your goals!
 
lifelong learning in nursing 
 
Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead!  
 

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Posted: 2/6/2016 5:44:19 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 4 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


Meeting My Professional Requirements [Infographic]

It can be overwhelming to keep track of license and certification expiration dates and continuing education requirements for renewal. This infographic will help you stay on track to meet your professional requirements. 
 
meeting my professional nursing requirements

Use My Nursing Care Plan for 2016 for a full look at assessing, planning, and implementing your goals for the year ahead! 
 
 

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:

Posted: 1/31/2016 7:07:57 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 1 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


My Nursing Care Plan

I know, I know, another care plan…but this one is for YOU! Use this quick care plan to make sure you are on the right track to meet your goals!
 

Assessment

meeting my professional nursing requirementsWhat do I need to do this year to meet my professional requirements?

  • When is my nursing license(s) due for renewal?
  • Am I on track to meet my CE requirements for license renewal?
  • Do I need to obtain CE to maintain my current certification(s)?

be a lifelong learner in nursingHow can I be a lifelong learner in nursing?

  • Is it time for me to go back to school?
  • Should I get certified in a specialty?
  • Which professional nursing organization(s) should I join?

work-life balance in nursingDo I have good work-life balance?

  • When’s the last time I had a physical exam?
  • Am I due for any immunizations or screenings?
  • Am I seeing my family and friends?
  • Do I have time to do things that bring me joy?
  • How is my stress level?

Nursing Diagnoses

  • Knowledge deficit related to meeting my professional requirements.
  • Readiness for enhanced knowledge related to striving to provide evidence-based nursing care.
  • Readiness for enhanced self-health management related to identifying my own health care needs.
  • Readiness for enhanced self-care related to maintaining personal relationships and managing stress.

Planning

Meeting my professional requirements
  • Look at my current nursing license(s) and certification(s) and check the expiration dates.
  • Visit the website of my state board of nursing for information on license renewal and CE requirements.
  • Contact my certification organization for information related to renewal and CE requirements.
  • Consider my options for meeting my CE requirements.
                   *Online CE activities.
                   *Live events, such as national or local conferences.
                   *Check for opportunities to earn CE through my employer.
Lifelong learning
  • Explore BSN and advanced degree programs.
  • Investigate specialty certification opportunities.
  • Consider which professional organizations would be a good fit for me.
Balancing work and life
  • Look back at my own medical records and make a list of what screenings and immunizations are recommended based on my age and medical and family history.
  • Update my calendar with my work schedule and upcoming social events. Schedule “me-time” too!
  • Think about how I best deal with stress. Is it a yoga class? Reading? Being outdoors? Find activities to meet my stress-relief needs.

Implementation

Meeting my professional requirements
  • Mark expiration dates on my calendar.
  • Develop a file (actual or online) to store my CE documents.
  • Use My Planner on Lippincott NursingCenter’s CEConnection to plan my CE activities and store my certificates.
  • Register for conferences and make travel plans. Inquire if my employer will contribute to covering costs.
Lifelong learning
  • Apply to a nursing program that meets my educational needs and goals.
  • Get certified!
  • Join and get involved with a professional nursing organization. Take advantage of related benefits and consider joining a committee or leadership position.
Balancing work and life
  • Schedule appointments and screenings.
  • Stick to my schedule, as best as I am able.
  • Sign up for a class, gym, or other activities that help me manage stress. Remain committed to these endeavors.

Evaluation

Revisit this care plan throughout the year and fill this in. Ongoing evaluation and revisions are key components to meeting my goals.

Leave a comment here – writing down your goals and plans is a good first step! Good luck!
join-LNC.JPG
 

 

Posted: 1/28/2016 11:57:26 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 4 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


No snow day for nurses

There is about a foot of snow outside already this morning. The blizzard of 2016, #blizzard2016, or Jonas – they are calling it. I am reminded of being snowed in at the hospital back in 1996, during a similar storm. We had packed our bags and headed in for what looked to be a few days spent at the hospital, doing what we always did – putting patients first. All essential hospital staff were expected to report to work and to remain there until the storm passed. Rooms were set up for us to rest, when it was our turn, and food was being prepared. We were going to be taken care of too.

There are no snow days for nurses. I know many of my friends and colleagues are hunkered down in the hospital again today. Thank you all!

Here are some past journal articles that might be comforting or helpful to you during these next few days…

snow days and nursesThe Snowtacular
Home Healthcare Nurse
"Not nurses, we are essential personnel. I have to go," I responded. As I donned my sweater, coat, knee-high boots, and gloves, I felt prepared for the challenges of the day. Little did I know...?
 
snow and nurses
Reflections: What One Thing Will Make Today Better for You?

AJN, American Journal of Nursing
It's been at least 10 years, but I still remember that it was a difficult morning getting to work. The snow was piled high and the roads weren't yet plowed. Nevertheless, all staff showed up-the usual when you worked on a busy oncology unit.



surviving winter storms
Surviving Winter Storms

Nursing2005
On the road this winter? If winter storms are a possibility in your area, keep this advice in mind.
 




 Stay warm, be safe, and keep up the good work!
 
Posted: 1/23/2016 8:22:23 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


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