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Authors

  1. McCain, Nancy L.
  2. Zeller, Janice M.
  3. Cella, David F.
  4. Urbanski, Pamela A.
  5. Novak, Richard M.

Abstract

A pretest-posttest design (with a 6-week wait-list control and a 6-month comparison group) was used to compare the effectiveness of a 6-week stress management training program with standard outpatient care for 45 men with HIV disease. Outcomes included stress levels, coping patterns, quality of life, psychological distress, illness-related uncertainly, and CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels. At 6 weeks, intervention was associated with increases in the emotional well-being dimension of quality of life. After 6 months, the intervention group had a relative decline in HIV-related intrusive thinking, indicating that stress management training may have buffered illness-related psychological distress over time.