Buy this Article for $7.95

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here:

When you buy this you'll get access to the ePub version, a downloadable PDF, and the ability to print the full article.

Keywords

Communication, Labor stage, Patient safety, Quality improvement, Second stage of labor

 

Authors

  1. Wood, Jessica DNP, WHNP-BC, RNC-OB
  2. Stevenson, Eleanor PhD, RN

Abstract

Background: During labor, effective communication and collaboration among the healthcare team is critical for patient safety; however, there is currently no standard for communication and documentation of the plan of care as agreed upon by healthcare team members and the woman in labor.

 

Objectives: The goal of this project was to increase consistency in communication and collaboration between clinicians and laboring women during second-stage labor.

 

Methods: An hourly "time-out" meeting of all healthcare team members was initiated for all women during second-stage labor. A documentation tool was implemented to ensure regular and clear communication between the clinical team and laboring women. Data were collected via medical review of cases of second-stage labor lasting more than 2 hours (n = 21 in the pre-implementation group; n = 39 for 3 months postimplementation; and n = 468 patients for 2 years post-implementation). Surveys were conducted of the clinical team (n = 40) and patients (n = 28).

 

Results: Following implementation, documented agreement of the plan of care increased from 14.3% before the project to 82.1% 3 months after implementation and remained at 81.6% 2 years after implementation. All nurses who participated in the survey reported a clear understanding of how and when to complete necessary medical record documentation during second-stage labor. The providers viewed the project favorably. Most women (92.9%) reported satisfaction with their experience. This project enhanced collaborative communication between members of the clinical team and laboring women and improved patient satisfaction. The improvements were sustainable over a 2-year period.