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Keywords

aged, hypertension, self-management, social ecological model

 

Authors

  1. Zhang, Xiao-Nan BD
  2. Qiu, Chen BD
  3. Zheng, Yu-Zhi MD
  4. Zang, Xiao-Ying PhD
  5. Zhao, Yue PhD

Abstract

Background: The hypertension control rate in China is much lower than that in developed countries. Self-management among elderly patients with hypertension can improve blood pressure control; thus, it is necessary to explore its association with individual and social environmental factors.

 

Objective: Our objective was to investigate self-management among elderly patients with hypertension in China and its association with individual and social environmental factors based on the social ecological model.

 

Methods: A total of 301 elderly patients with hypertension were recruited to do a questionnaire survey based on the social ecological model, which included the General Demographic Information Questionnaire, Hypertension Patients Self-Management Behavior Rating Scale, World Health Organization Well-Being Index, Family APGAR Index, and Social Support Rating Scale.

 

Results: The lowest level of self-management behaviors was in exercise management, and the highest was in medication management. The results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that well-being, family function, sex, education level, and age were pivotal individual and social environmental factors influencing self-management behaviors among elderly patients with hypertension.

 

Conclusions: There is a need to develop and test interventions that improve self-management in elderly patients with hypertension. Specifically, individualized interventions to promote exercise among elderly persons with hypertension who are single and living alone are needed. Male patients with a lower education level, poor well-being, poor family function, and the lowest self-management levels are a key population to target.