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Keywords

adults, cognitive deficits, prevalence, traumatic brain injury

 

Authors

  1. Tsai, Ying-Chieh
  2. Liu, Chin-Jung
  3. Huang, Hui-Chuan
  4. Lin, Jiann-Her
  5. Chen, Pin-Yuan
  6. Su, Yu-Kai
  7. Chen, Chun-Ting
  8. Chiu, Hsiao-Yean

Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reports regarding prevalence of post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) cognitive deficits were inconsistent. We aimed to synthesize the prevalence of cognitive deficits after TBI in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses A&I databases were searched from the inception to April 27, 2020. Studies with prospective, retrospective, and cross-sectional designs reporting the prevalence of cognitive deficits after TBI in adults were included. RESULTS: A total of 15 articles were included for prevalence estimation. The pooled prevalence of memory and attention deficits after mild TBI was 31% and 20% in the acute phase and 26% and 18% in the subacute phase, respectively, and 49% and 54% in the subacute phase and 21% and 50% in the chronic phase after moderate-to-severe TBI. The overall prevalence of information processing speed deficits after mild TBI in the acute and subacute phases was 21% and 17%, respectively, and 57% in the chronic phase after moderate-to-severe TBI. The overall prevalence of executive dysfunction in the subacute and chronic phases was 48% and 38%, respectively, after moderate-to-severe TBI. CONCLUSION: Cognitive deficits are prevalent in the acute to chronic phases after TBI. Healthcare providers should design effective intervention targeting cognitive impairment after TBI as early as possible.