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Keywords

Adaptation/psychological, Anxiety, Conflict/psychological, Fathers, Pregnancy, Social support

 

Authors

  1. Hyer, Suzanne PhD, RN
  2. Hu, Wenfang PhD
  3. Hu, Mengtong BS
  4. Davis, Jean W. PhD, DNP, EdD, APRN, FNP-BC, PHCNS-BC
  5. Xie, Rui PhD
  6. Giurgescu, Carmen PhD, RN, WHNP, FAAN

Abstract

Purpose: Pregnancy-related anxiety may increase the risk of preterm birth. Effective coping strategies and social support may help minimize pregnancy-related anxiety.

 

Study Design: Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data.

 

Methods: A sample of 408 pregnant non-Hispanic Black women completed questionnaires between 19 and 31 weeks gestation. Mediation analysis with structural equation modeling was used to explore effects of the relationship with the father of the baby on pregnancy-related anxiety.

 

Results: Support from the father of the baby was negatively associated with avoidance coping (r = -.22, p < .001) and pregnancy-related anxiety (r = - .17, p < .001), whereas conflict with the father of the baby was positively associated with avoidance coping (r = .37, p < .001) and pregnancy-related anxiety (r = .29, p < .001). Avoidance coping was positively associated with pregnancy-related anxiety (r = .34, p < .001). After adjustment, avoidance coping partially mediated the effect of conflict with the father of the baby on pregnancy-related anxiety.

 

Clinical Implications: Discussions with women about management of pregnancy-related anxiety should consider her current social support and coping mechanisms. Providers should offer support and resources on adaptive coping strategies.