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What are all those letters and how can I get them?

clock September 14, 2014 09:07 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

BSN, RN-C, APHN-BC, PPCNP-BC, DNP… There are so many opportunities for furthering your nursing education. Whether it’s achieving a new academic degree or getting certified in your specialty, we’ve got resources to share with you! Take some time to explore these FREE resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter!

Focus On: Achieving Your BSN
Learn why now is the time to return to school, and gain advice on overcoming barriers that are in your way. 

Focus On: Achieving Your Advanced Nursing Degree
With options such as online programs and employer-based incentives, achieving an advanced degree in nursing is within reach. 

Nursing Certification Boards By Specialty
Certification in a nursing specialty demonstrates a commitment to advancing one’s knowledge and skillset. 

Good luck to you in your future educational endeavors!



Suicide assessment – an important nursing responsibility

clock August 20, 2014 09:09 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

As we continue to mourn the loss of Robin Williams, an iconic entertainer and comedian, it’s important for us to take a step toward learning from his death. As nurses, our responsibilities to our patients are numerous, but we know that safety is a number one priority. Even if we don’t routinely care for patients with mental illness, patients that we encounter may have a mental illness of which we are unaware. Some patients may have an undiagnosed or newly diagnosed disorder that may increase their suicide risk, whether due to its pathophysiology or its impact on quality of life. In nursing school, we learned about suicidal ideation and how to do a suicide assessment. I’d like to share some resources from our journals with you to revisit this important topic.

 

Assessing patients for suicide risk
Nursing2010 

Suicide Prevention in Neurology Patients: Evidence to Guide Practice
Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

All along the watchtower: Suicide risk screening, a pilot study 
Nursing Management

As If the Cancer Wasn't Enough... A Case Study of Depression in Terminal Illness
Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing

Additional Resources
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
National Alliance on Mental Illness
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Directory of support groups



Nurses On the Move: Lorry Schoenly

clock July 31, 2014 03:29 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Nurses work in all types of environments. Whether it is an ER, university, military, consulting firm, or even a prison, the role of the nurse goes far beyond the typical hospital setting.

July’s Nurse On the Move, Lorry Schoenly PhD, RN, CCHP-RN, is a correctional healthcare risk consultant for jail and prison clients. She also currently serves as part of the faculty at the Chamberlain College of Nursing and writes a monthly column on correctional healthcare issues, along with podcasts.

Schoenly previously served as the director of education of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses and assistant vice president of Rancocas Hospital, among other titles. She started her career as a staff nurse. She received her bachelor’s of nursing from Excelsior College and earned both her master’s in burns, emergency, and trauma, and doctorate in nursing from Widener University.

Through our interview, I learned why Schoenly went into correctional nursing and what daily reminder she has for nurses.

Q: Why did you decide to become a nurse?
A:  I never imagined being a nurse while growing up. I come from a family of educators. While in critical care after the difficult delivery of our son, I looked around at the nurses scurrying about and thought, "These folks are doing meaningful work.” I was hooked.

Q: You started as a staff nurse and remained in that role for a little over three years. What motivated you to continue your education and become a staff instructor and, eventually, a director of education?
A:  I guess I have always been an educator at heart. As a staff nurse…I was like a sponge soaking up information from any inservice or continuing education course I could find. I was thrilled to apply and be accepted [to a staff development position]…where I was able to continue in patient care, while managing the orientation of new staff and creating inservices for new treatment and equipment. For me, it was an ideal combination.

Q: As a nurse educator, what advice do you have to inspire others to further their education?
A:  You can almost never go wrong with education. One of the joys of nursing is the wide array of opportunities. If you are unhappy in your current position, research other options and determine what is needed for an entry-level position. Enjoy the journey and seek to apply everything you learn in the classroom into your current work experiences.

Q: How did you become interested in correctional nursing?
A:  Like many in our specialty, I am an accidental correctional nurse. I don't know anyone who announced as a child that they wanted to be a jail nurse when they grew up. In fact, it had never occurred to me that nurses worked in jails and prisons until I answered an advertisement for a nurse educator position in the NJ prison system. However, once I saw the great need for nursing care and nursing caring behind bars, I saw an opportunity to bring my skills and abilities to bear both locally and nationally. Correctional nurses care for a vulnerable, marginalized, and very needy patient population. And, it takes grit and determination to work in that environment day after day. I see firsthand the struggles correctional nurses have in the low resourced and ethically challenging criminal justice system. I do what I can to support their efforts.

Q: As a correctional healthcare consultant, what is your biggest challenge related to patient care?
A: The greatest challenge I face when helping improve patient care is organizational culture. Pervasive attitudes among team members are hard to eradicate. We want quick fixes, whether it be losing weight, getting dinner on the table, or improving a relationship. It is the same in healthcare. Leaders want to write a policy, inservice staff, and then move on to the next thing on the list. It doesn't work like that in organizations, even though we wish it would!

Q: If you could give nurses a daily reminder, what would it be?
A: The encouragement I use at the end of each of my Correctional Nursing Today podcasts is to "Make today count for good.”  As nurses, we always have an opportunity to make a difference in someone's life, and I try to remind myself of that regularly. A quotation on the whiteboard of my office that encourages me is from Goethe, "Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do,” As an educator, I try to continually encourage others to apply what they are learning, otherwise it is for naught.

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?
A:  The future of nursing is bright as we move forward. There are many opportunities for nurses to make a difference, no matter the position or location. Correctional nursing, in particular, is advancing as a specialty, and I am delighted to be a part of it!



Read these award-winners!

clock July 3, 2014 01:33 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Last month, 21 Apex Awards were presented to journals published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. These awards are based on “excellence in graphic design, editorial content and the ability to achieve overall communications excellence.” The award-winning articles from our nursing journals are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you!

Shining a Light on Hoarding Disorder
Nursing2013

Responding To an Active Shooter and Other Threats of Violence 
Nursing2013

25th Annual Legislative Update: Evidence-Based Practice Reforms Improve Access to APRN Care 
The Nurse Practitioner: The American Journal of Primary Health Care 

The Hard Truth about Human Trafficking 
Nursing Management

IT Extra: Technology Management Strategies for Nurse Leaders  
Nursing Management

Smart Management: Recruitment And Retention: How To Get Them And How To Keep Them
OR Nurse 2013

Smart Management: High reliability Organizations: An Idea Worth Pursuing 
OR Nurse 2013

Smart Management: Build Your Staff's Leadership Skills 
OR Nurse 2013

Managing Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
OR Nurse 2013

Editorial: A Grassroots Movement Sounds the Call 
American Journal of Nursing



Cover Image from January 2014 issue of American Journal of Nursing


January 2013 issue of Nursing2013 Critical Care



Nurses On the Move: Helene Bowen-Brady

clock June 24, 2014 04:33 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

As summer heats up, so do the incredible nurses who focus on the hottest professional topics.

This month’s
Nurse On the Move is Helene Bowen-Brady, M.Ed, BSN, RN-BC, the program manager for professional development at Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital. Not only does she focus on guiding the Department of Nursing on a Magnet Journey, but she also sits on the Steering Committee for the CLCDN (Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing), and recently served as the site coordinator for an international nursing research project.

Bowen-Brady previously served as a nurse educator, lactation consultant, and school nurse, all while raising her four children. She received her BSN from Boston College. She also earned a master’s degree and is currently exploring doctoral programs.

I interviewed Bowen-Brady to discover what drew her to such different roles in nursing and what she sees for the profession in the future.

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?

A: Honestly, I wasn’t sure when I was 16 what I wanted to do. In the early 70’s, the career advice I received was to become either a teacher or a nurse. In the end, the motivation was simply that nurses who went to diploma schools got to live away at school, and if I became a teacher, I would have to commute to college. At 16, it was a very easy decision – I wanted to live away.  In retrospect, it was the best decision for me. As a nurse, I have had an incredible career.

Q: You worked with Canton public schools as a school nurse. How was that working environment and why did you choose to pursue a different venue for nursing?

A: I started working as a substitute nurse because the hours worked for my family. Little did I know what a great career move that would turn out to be and what wonderful clinical and leadership experiences school nursing would provide. In all of the nursing roles that I have had, I think that school nursing was probably the most challenging. School nurses work independently in most settings to manage a variety of complex acute and chronic healthcare needs for students of all ages.

Q: You were previously a lactation consultant. What drew you to that role?

A: Personal need – when my first son was born there was limited, if any, support for breastfeeding mothers in my community. When I worked as a VNA nurse, I was fortunate to work with an innovative nurse director who supported me to expand the services we provided for families with newborns.

Q: What encouraged you to continue your education as a nurse?

A: I believe that lifelong learning is essential for every nurse. The knowledge I gain from reading journal articles, attending classes, listening to webinars, or taking an online class absolutely helps me to be a better practitioner.

Q: You’ve spent a good amount of your career working in staff development and education. How has professional development changed over the years, if at all?

A: The biggest change is the technology. When I first became an educator in 1980, I had to handwrite every lecture, which was then typed by the department secretary since she was the only person with a typewriter. Finding relevant journal articles meant a trip to a hospital library or a local college. Today, I have countless electronic folders stored on my computer. Search engines make it easy to find reliable and current information about any topic. There are so many new and innovative technological strategies and tools that educators can use to engage adult learners in order to positively enhance learning activities to make them more meaningful for staff.

Q: What do you envision for the future of nursing?

A: When I entered nursing school in the early 70’s, healthcare was primarily provided in the acute care hospital. Over the past 40 years, healthcare has changed dramatically. Nurses have an opportunity to play key roles in the future of healthcare and most of these expanded roles will be outside of the inpatient setting. I truly believe that the changes ahead will prove to be in the best interest of our patients and families.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?

A: It would be to encourage nurses to get involved. Step outside the comfort zone of the unit or area you work in – join a committee at work or the professional organization that represents your practice area’s local chapter. There are so many incredibly talented and innovative nurses within the profession that each one of us can learn from. 



Nurses On the Move: Karlene Kerfoot

clock May 19, 2014 09:22 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

National Nurses Week ended May 12th. It was a great opportunity to reflect on the important nurses who changed the course of the profession.

Today, nurses are still serving as role models to those around them. In recognition, we honor a NursingCenter member, Karlene Kerfoot PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, as this month’s Nurse On the Move. Currently the Chief Clinical Integration Officer at API, Kerfoot also worked in patient care administration, clinical practice, and healthcare consulting. She served in adjunct academic positions and was the Corporate Chief Nursing and Patient Care Officer at three of the largest healthcare systems in the U.S. She earned a doctorate in nursing from the University of Illinois and a master’s and BSN from the University of Iowa.

I spoke with her to learn a little more about her outstanding work and to discover what she sees for the future of nursing.

Q: Why did you choose nursing as a profession?
A: Well, it wasn’t my first choice. I wanted to go into political science, but there were limited jobs there. I know I wanted to make a difference. With nursing, it’s a great opportunity. You can travel and do different things. I forgot about political science and never looked back.

Q: What encouraged you to continue your education as a nurse?
A: I wanted to be able to have a choice of options as I got older. With a master’s or a PhD, you have more choices. I know I wanted to work in a complex setting where I could combine research and so on. I thought, “20 years from now, what will people want? They’ll want advanced degrees. I better get busy!”

Q: In your current role, what is the biggest challenge you face?
A: My biggest challenge is that many technology firms have technology people developing applications, but on the client side, the applications lack client input. I need to make sure they fit and that they are what’s needed out there and are relevant to the frontline clinical person.

Q: Nurses Week was celebrated May 6-12th. Why do you believe this week is important?
A: It’s important to understand your history and future. There are so many people who have changed the course of history, for instance Florence Nightingale. They are fabulous role models for people to look at and think, “I can change history too.”

Q: What are the top four ways nurses can avoid holding back their careers?
A: The first way to avoid holding back your career is to learn positive discontentment. Florence Nightingale said, “If you’re not moving forward, you’re moving backward.” We need to value innovative people, especially those who take a positive outlook on things and who can offer solutions, not just complaints.

Second, practice “No Excuse” career development. Florence Nightingale was discontent, and it pushed her to make changes [not just give up].

Third, talk about your work in measurable outcomes. Saying “I did good work” isn’t good enough anymore. In the last 10-15 years, there’s been a push for measurement. Give examples that show things happened because of you.

Fourth, become agile with technology. Technology is everywhere. Look for what’s coming in the future and what it will mean to patients. It’s like a language you need to understand.

Q: For a nurse starting out, what would be your number one piece of advice?
A: Look ahead and think about what people will need in the future and how you can provide it. You are your own company, so you need to prepare for the future. Every three to five months, practice strategic thinking, “What have I learned and what do I need to learn?”

Q: Finally, what do you envision for the future of nursing?
A: I wish, as time goes on, nurses will be more empowered. The public says nurses are the most trusted workers and they should be involved in healthcare policy and reform. I would hope nurses become more prepared to sit at those tables and to a make a difference because nurses are the spokesperson for the patient.

Do you know the perfect nurse to be featured for Nurses On the Move? Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.



The ‘Threat’ of NPs: An NCNP 2014 Wrap-Up

clock May 5, 2014 07:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

It’s been a little over a week since the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners in Chicago, and I am reviewing my notes and reminded of the learning and networking that took place during the conference. On my very first page, from the Welcome and Opening Remarks of Conference Chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald, DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, SCP, FAAN, DCC, I had written the following: 

I remember this point vividly, as Dr. Fitzgerald had commented that years ago, when our numbers were much smaller, not too many people had an issue with nurse practitioners practicing to the full extent of our education and training. Now however, as there are over 180,000 nurse practitioners, the power of our numbers is threatening to many, even despite recent research demonstrating our value in patient outcomes and satisfaction. This point is incredibly evident in this recent Op Ed piece from The New York Times, Nurses are not Doctors, where the author cites a study from 1999 to support his opinion, which is clearly not the most up-to-date, best available evidence. Have you read it? I encourage you to do so when you are sitting down, because it did bring out a bit of my temper. Rest assured that some leaders in nursing did reply with some Letters to the Editor and you can read them here

And now back to some take-aways from NCNP…

*The states with the least restrictive NP regulations see twice as many patients as those in other states.
Carol L. Thompson, PhD, DNP, ACNP, FNP, FCCM, FAANP
Keynote Address: Awesome Practiced Daily

*Don’t use an ARB and ACE inhibitor concomitantly to treat hypertension.
Joyce L. Ross, MSN, CRNP, CLS, FNLA, FPCNA
JNC-Late: A Focus and Update on the Long-Awaited Hypertension Guidelines

*Not all infected patients are febrile and not all febrile patients are infected.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*If a patient has an inappropriate tachycardia related to his elevated temperature, consider pulmonary embolism as the cause.
Lynn A. Kelso, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP
Acute: Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults

*Sepsis doesn’t kill patients; multisystem organ failure resulting from sepsis does.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*If a patient has kidney injury, used unfractionated heparin for DVT prophylaxis.
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Acute: Understanding the Latest Sepsis Guidelines

*Our patients give us very important information, if we listen!
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*If a patient has loss of the hair that makes up the outer eyebrows, think hypothyroidism. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*The presence of pulsus paradoxus is a sign of cardiac tamponade, but can also be seen in severe asthma.
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
Common Sense Assessment Tips Every NP Should Know

*To assess judgment in patients with traumatic brain injury, ask “What would you do if there was a fire in your kitchen?”
Tracey Andersen, MSN, CNRN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC
Neuro Assessment and Diagnostic Work-up for Advanced Practitioners

Thanks for reading this wrap-up! Want to see photos from the event? Here’s our album – enjoy! 



CEConnection for Allied Health Professionals

clock April 18, 2014 04:34 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know Lippincott has its own CEConnection tailor-made for allied health professionals? This one-stop resource hosts more than 110 continuing education courses design to help allied health workers improve patient outcomes with activities based on evidence-based practice guidelines. 

This platform offers peer-reviewed multimedia and interactive content from Lippincott journals. The platform is also customizable for institutions and individuals. You can track courses using your own My Planner tab, enabling you to add activities to do now or save for later. You are also able to browse courses by categories, including clinical, topic, specialty, and profession. Once you add an education activity, it’s displayed in your planner, as well as your Shopping Cart. 

Allied Health’s CEConnection currently covers courses for 12 professions, including:

Addiction Counselor
Cardiovascular Technologist
Case Manager
Clinical Laboratory Scientist
Dietetic Professional
Healthcare Quality Professional
Pathology Technologist
Pharmacist
Physical Therapist
Respiratory Therapist
Radiologic Technologist
Speech-Language Pathologist

Each month, new courses and additional allied health specialties are added. 

CEConnection for allied health professionals is available for institutional and individual purchase. Healthcare institutions and specialists interested in this platform can get more information by calling 855-695-5070 or sending an email to Sales@LippincottSolutions.com.



Nursing eBooks

clock April 7, 2014 06:58 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know that Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com houses more than 25 different nursing eBooks? From books on evidence-based practice to infusion coding to LGBTQ cultures, you are sure to find an interesting topic worth reading about. Book purchases include an eReader format for download to a device such as an iPad, Nook, or Kindle. 

Let’s take a look at some of the eBooks our site has to offer:

AJN's Evidence-Based Practice Series: Step by Step
Better your evidence-based practice through a series of articles from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. 

Ten Years of Teaching and Learning Moments
This eBook includes brief vignettes that chronicle the first-person experiences of teachers, students, and patients as they learn about the science and the art of medicine. It derives its content from the first 10 years of the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the journal, Academic Medicine

The Editor's Handbook: An Online Resource and CE Course
Designed for journal editors, this eBook explores  impact factors, journal indexing, budgeting, journal development, editorial board composition, and the peer review process. 

LGBTQ Cultures: What Health Care Professionals Need to Know About Sexual and Gender Diversity 
Intended to serve as an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) health issues, this eBook helps healthcare professionals create safe environments for patients, as well as their LGBTQ coworkers. 

Synthesis Science in Healthcare Book Series (Books 1-18)
The Joanna Briggs Institute offers this eBook series for individual purchases of $19.99 or books 1-18 for $220. Books 1-18 will help you understand the JBI model of evidence-based healthcare, appraise qualitative and quantitative research, appraise evidence from intervention and diagnostic accuracy studies, and learn ways to minimize risks from adverse events. 

Nurse Practitioner 2012 Liability Update: A Three-part Approach 
Celebrate the CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO)’s 20th anniversary (in 2012) of the nurse practitioner professional liability insurance program with this free eBook. 

Understanding Nurse Liability, 2006 – 2010: A Three-part Approach 
The CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO) aim to educate nurses about risk with this free eBook, which focuses on nurse closed claims over a five-year period. 

Lessons from a Visionary Leader 
Richard Hader, the long-standing and highly-respected late Editor-in-Chief of the Nursing Management journal, offers advice to leaders in healthcare organizations on how to be courageous, creative, take risks, and say “no.”



Nursing2014 Symposium

clock March 31, 2014 08:08 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I’m on my flight home after another successful LWW nursing conference! Nursing2014 Symposium was held from March 26 to March 29, and between the preconference workshops, sessions, exhibit hall, and city of Las Vegas, these days were overflowing with learning from national experts, networking with colleagues, and fun!

I was lucky enough to assist with the preconference workshop, Let’s Get Messy: Hands-On Anatomy, Resuscitation, and Emergency Skills Lab, presented by Scott DeBoer, RN, MSN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CFRN, EMP-P. During this one-of-a-kind course, we reviewed anatomy and practiced procedures such as intraosseous device placement, airway management techniques, and more. We even practiced skills on actual pig airways, hearts, and lungs. Here are some pictures!  

A recurring theme throughout the sessions I attended had to be changing clinical practice based on the evidence. In the opening session, Nurse’s Habits: “But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It!, Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN, reviewed many of the practices that we perform just because we’ve always done them. From the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension to methods used for verifying placement of feeding tubes, it is clear that we’ve got a long way to go to change practice based on the evidence. (FYI – unless contraindicated, position hypotensive patients flat with the legs elevated; get an x-ray to confirm feeding tube placement.) 

Here are some more tips & takeaways from this conference: 

*The guiding principles of patient and family-centered care are information sharing, participation, dignity and respect, and collaboration. 
Tiffany Christensen
Partnering with Patients – A Bed’s-Eye View of Patient and Family-Centered Care

*If you don’t know how to do something, don’t ask someone else who doesn’t know! 
JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS
Medication Safety: Going Far Beyond the Five Rights

*It costs between $45,000 and $55,000 to treat central line bloodstream infection (CLBSI). 
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Best Practices for PICCs and CVCs

*The only thing you can pre-chart is a plan. Anything else, document as you do it or after it’s done. 
Edie Brous, RN, MS, BSN, MPH, Esq.
Documentation and Liability: How What You Write Can Show Up in Court

*HgbA1C levels are not accurate in sickle cell carriers or anemic patients. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
ADVANCED TRACK: Sweet Success – Making Sense of the Dizzying Deluge of Diabetes Drugs

*Test for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Caucasian patients younger than 45 with COPD. 
Mary Knudtson, DNSc, NP, FAAN
Acute Exacerbation of COPD

*Make sure the ‘tank is full’ before using vasopressors. 
Michael Ackerman, DNS, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FNAP, FAANP
ADVANCED TRACK: Hemodynamic Stability

These are just the highlights of the many notes I took during the conference. I hope that those of you who attended had a great time learning and networking too! Don’t forget that you can access the slides from many of the presentations online at Lippincott's eConference Center. Also, be sure to complete your evaluations and obtain your CE credit!

I am now looking ahead and getting excited for the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners April 23-26, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. What conferences have you attended or do you plan to attend this year?



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