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Nursing eBooks

clock April 7, 2014 06:58 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know that Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com houses more than 25 different nursing eBooks? From books on evidence-based practice to infusion coding to LGBTQ cultures, you are sure to find an interesting topic worth reading about. Book purchases include an eReader format for download to a device such as an iPad, Nook, or Kindle. 

Let’s take a look at some of the eBooks our site has to offer:

AJN's Evidence-Based Practice Series: Step by Step
Better your evidence-based practice through a series of articles from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. 

Ten Years of Teaching and Learning Moments
This eBook includes brief vignettes that chronicle the first-person experiences of teachers, students, and patients as they learn about the science and the art of medicine. It derives its content from the first 10 years of the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the journal, Academic Medicine

The Editor's Handbook: An Online Resource and CE Course
Designed for journal editors, this eBook explores  impact factors, journal indexing, budgeting, journal development, editorial board composition, and the peer review process. 

LGBTQ Cultures: What Health Care Professionals Need to Know About Sexual and Gender Diversity 
Intended to serve as an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) health issues, this eBook helps healthcare professionals create safe environments for patients, as well as their LGBTQ coworkers. 

Synthesis Science in Healthcare Book Series (Books 1-18)
The Joanna Briggs Institute offers this eBook series for individual purchases of $19.99 or books 1-18 for $220. Books 1-18 will help you understand the JBI model of evidence-based healthcare, appraise qualitative and quantitative research, appraise evidence from intervention and diagnostic accuracy studies, and learn ways to minimize risks from adverse events. 

Nurse Practitioner 2012 Liability Update: A Three-part Approach 
Celebrate the CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO)’s 20th anniversary (in 2012) of the nurse practitioner professional liability insurance program with this free eBook. 

Understanding Nurse Liability, 2006 – 2010: A Three-part Approach 
The CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO) aim to educate nurses about risk with this free eBook, which focuses on nurse closed claims over a five-year period. 

Lessons from a Visionary Leader 
Richard Hader, the long-standing and highly-respected late Editor-in-Chief of the Nursing Management journal, offers advice to leaders in healthcare organizations on how to be courageous, creative, take risks, and say “no.”



Nursing2014 Symposium

clock March 31, 2014 08:08 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I’m on my flight home after another successful LWW nursing conference! Nursing2014 Symposium was held from March 26 to March 29, and between the preconference workshops, sessions, exhibit hall, and city of Las Vegas, these days were overflowing with learning from national experts, networking with colleagues, and fun!

I was lucky enough to assist with the preconference workshop, Let’s Get Messy: Hands-On Anatomy, Resuscitation, and Emergency Skills Lab, presented by Scott DeBoer, RN, MSN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CFRN, EMP-P. During this one-of-a-kind course, we reviewed anatomy and practiced procedures such as intraosseous device placement, airway management techniques, and more. We even practiced skills on actual pig airways, hearts, and lungs. Here are some pictures!  

A recurring theme throughout the sessions I attended had to be changing clinical practice based on the evidence. In the opening session, Nurse’s Habits: “But That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It!, Julie Miller, RN, BSN, CCRN, reviewed many of the practices that we perform just because we’ve always done them. From the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension to methods used for verifying placement of feeding tubes, it is clear that we’ve got a long way to go to change practice based on the evidence. (FYI – unless contraindicated, position hypotensive patients flat with the legs elevated; get an x-ray to confirm feeding tube placement.) 

Here are some more tips & takeaways from this conference: 

*The guiding principles of patient and family-centered care are information sharing, participation, dignity and respect, and collaboration. 
Tiffany Christensen
Partnering with Patients – A Bed’s-Eye View of Patient and Family-Centered Care

*If you don’t know how to do something, don’t ask someone else who doesn’t know! 
JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS
Medication Safety: Going Far Beyond the Five Rights

*It costs between $45,000 and $55,000 to treat central line bloodstream infection (CLBSI). 
Sophia Chu Rodgers, ACNP, FNP, FAANP, FCCM
Best Practices for PICCs and CVCs

*The only thing you can pre-chart is a plan. Anything else, document as you do it or after it’s done. 
Edie Brous, RN, MS, BSN, MPH, Esq.
Documentation and Liability: How What You Write Can Show Up in Court

*HgbA1C levels are not accurate in sickle cell carriers or anemic patients. 
Christine Kessler, RN, MN, CNS, ANP, BC-ADM
ADVANCED TRACK: Sweet Success – Making Sense of the Dizzying Deluge of Diabetes Drugs

*Test for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Caucasian patients younger than 45 with COPD. 
Mary Knudtson, DNSc, NP, FAAN
Acute Exacerbation of COPD

*Make sure the ‘tank is full’ before using vasopressors. 
Michael Ackerman, DNS, RN, ACNP-BC, FCCM, FNAP, FAANP
ADVANCED TRACK: Hemodynamic Stability

These are just the highlights of the many notes I took during the conference. I hope that those of you who attended had a great time learning and networking too! Don’t forget that you can access the slides from many of the presentations online at Lippincott's eConference Center. Also, be sure to complete your evaluations and obtain your CE credit!

I am now looking ahead and getting excited for the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners April 23-26, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. What conferences have you attended or do you plan to attend this year?



The number of male nurses is on the rise

clock March 24, 2014 05:43 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of men entering the nursing profession has tripled since 1970. The study, which tracks data through 2011, shows an increase from 2.7 to 9.6 percent, meaning about 330,000 men are working as nurses to date. 

To celebrate and encourage more men entering the profession, here is some nursing content related to male nurses on NursingCenter.com. 

Continuing Education Activities
 Men in Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, January 2013
Expires: 1/31/2015 

 Original Research: 'How Should I Touch You?': A Qualitative Study of Attitudes on Intimate Touch in Nursing Care, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, March 2011
Expires: 3/31/2015 

Journal Articles
 Team concepts: The nurse in the man: Lifting up nursing or lifting himself?, Nursing Management, June 2013 

 ISSUES IN NURSING: Men work here too: How men can thrive in maternal-newborn nursing, Nursing2014, March 2013 

 Online Exclusive: Are male nurses emotionally intelligent?, Nursing Management, April 2012

 Recruitment & Retention Report: EXTRA Young adults' perception of an ideal career Does gender matter?, Nursing Management, April 2011 

 Gender and Professional Values: A Closer Look, Nursing Management, January 2011 

 Letters: Men and Nursing, AJN, American Journal of Nursing, April 2013 



NursingCenter’s “Specialty Sites”

clock March 19, 2014 04:06 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Are you familiar with NursingCenter’s specialty sites? In the past few years, NursingCenter has launched two specialty sites, the Evidence Based Practice Network and the Skin Care Network. Both sites feature targeted, in-depth content and each have their own unique features and products. Let’s take a quick glance to learn more about these sites.

The Skin Care Network

The Skin Care Network was launched in 2011 by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. The goal is to share all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media. 

Take a look at some of our features: 

News
Discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items.

Tools & Resources
Organized by clinical topic, pages feature all dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities and patient education tools.

Society Partners
Learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses.

Skin Care Insider eNewsletter
Sign up for our free monthly eNewsletter that offers you the latest on skin care!

Social Media
Look for The Skin Care Network on Facebook and Twitter.

The Evidence-Based Practice Network

Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network is an online resource powered by LWW and the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), which promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to healthcare professionals. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. 

Here are some network highlights: 

JBI Tools

JOURNAL CLUB*
Here, you gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty, as well as the opportunity to share information and ideas with other professionals.

SUMARI*
This premier review software package helps health professionals conduct systematic reviews of evidence of feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of health intervention.

TAP*
Analyze small qualitative datasets following a three-step process of entering data, categorizing data, and building themes. 

CAN-IMPLEMENT*
Tailor your clinical practice guidelines for local use with this JBI tool. 

JBI Library
Subscribe and gain access to JBI’s vast collection of evidence-based resources. 

JBI Continuing Education
Discover JBI’s continuing education resources, as well as their evidence-based practice series. 

‘Show Me The Evidence’ Blog
Stay up–to-date with Lippincott’s blog dedicated to evidence-based practice.

EBP Insider eNewsletter
Sign up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter!

Social Media
Follow The EBP Network on Facebook and Twitter



Take a look inside our collection of stroke resources

clock March 6, 2014 03:43 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Caring for patients with stroke can be challenging; when a stroke is occurring, it is imperative to distinguish the symptoms from other diagnoses. Determining the type and location of stroke is yet another difficulty. Further challenges are met with treatment and rehabilitation. 

To help you manage these complex issues, we’ve created a Focus On: Stroke collection, which is comprised of journal content, as well as the following special features:

Each item in this collection is only $1.99, or you can purchase the entire collection together with the Powerpoint slides, podcasts, and the Take5 for only $19.99 (doesn’t include CE).  

To further your learning and help you meet your continuing education requirements, we've bundled the three CE articles below at a reduced rate. Earn 7 contact hours for only $19.99 – that's a savings of more than $50 if purchased individually!

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: Follow the guidelines
Nursing2013
3 contact hours

Ischemic Stroke: The first 24 hours
The Nurse Practitioner
2 contact hours

Recognizing and Preventing Acute Stroke in Women
Nursing2012
2 contact hours

I hope you’ll take some time to explore this collection! Have a question or comment? Please feel free to connect with me here on the blog by leaving a comment or you can email me at clinicaleditor@nursingcenter.com.  



3 days left!

clock February 25, 2014 05:03 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Two of our most popular CE collections will be expiring on Friday, February 28, 2014. If you haven’t already taken advantage of these specially-priced collections, you should check them out ASAP!

Anticoagulant Medications
7.3 contact hours - $19.99
Expiration Date:  2/28/2014
When patients are on anticoagulant medications, significant safety concerns exist, especially the risk of excessive anticoagulation and hemorrhage. It is important to understand these risks yourself, as a healthcare provider, and to educate the patients in your care on how to minimize their risk and be alert for complications. 

NP: Pharmocology Hours
10.4 contact hours/10.4 advanced pharmacology hours - $44.95
Expiration Date:  2/28/2014
Depending on the state where you work as a nurse practitioner or your area of practice, it may be necessary for you to maintain a certain number of advanced pharmacology hours for your license or certification. 

Need more CE? See our complete list of topical CE collections and our special collections on ‘never events.’ Please be aware that the CE tests for each article must be taken before they expire.



AACN Choosing Wisely®

clock February 8, 2014 00:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

The Choosing Wisely® campaign was launched in 2012 by the American Board of Internal Medicine as a way to spark conversations to improve care and minimize unnecessary testing. The goals of the campaign are to ensure that care is supported by evidence; not duplicative of other tests or procedures already received; free from harm; and truly necessary (ABIM Foundation, 2014). Many organizations have released recommendations in support of the campaign – a full list is available here.

Last week, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) became the first nursing organization to get involved in the campaign. Its Choosing Wisely® list includes the following five evidence-based recommendations (American Association of Critical Care Nurses, 2014) :

  • Don't order diagnostic tests at regular intervals (such as every day), but rather in response to specific clinical questions.
  • Don't transfuse red blood cells in hemodynamically stable, non-bleeding critically ill patients with a hemoglobin concentration greater than 7 mg/dL.
  • Don't use parenteral nutrition in adequately nourished critically ill patients within the first seven days of a stay in an intensive care unit.
  • Don't deeply sedate mechanically ventilated patients without a specific indication and without daily attempts to lighten sedation.
  • Don't continue life support for patients at high risk for death or severely impaired functional recovery without offering patients and their families the alternative of care focused entirely on comfort.

As a nursing professional, I am proud to see AACN collaborate on this important initiative. I encourage you all to remain cognizant of these recommendations, share them with your peers, and stay up-to-date on the latest evidence.

For further reading, the articles below are available for free to logged in members of Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com.  Not a member?  Join now!

In the News: Rethinking Routine Blood Work in Patients with MI
American Journal of Nursing
 
Blood Management: Best-Practice Transfusion Strategies
Nursing2013
 
Parenteral Nutrition Risks, Complications, and Management
Journal of Infusion Nursing
 
Sedation Vacation: Worth the Trip
Nursing2013 Critical Care
 
Ethics in Critical Care: Twenty Years Since Cruzan and the Patient Self-Determination Act: Opportunities for Improving Care at the End of Life in Critical Care Settings
AACN Advanced Critical Care
 
Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst: Strategies to Promote Honesty and Prevent Medical Futility at End-of-Life
Dimensions in Critical Care Nursing

References:

ABIM Foundation. (2014). About. Retrieved from Choosing Wisely: http://www.choosingwisely.org/

American Association of Critical Care Nurses. (2014, January 28). News: Critical Care Groups Issue 'Choosing Wisely' List. Retrieved from American Association of Critical Care Nurses: http://www.aacn.org/wd/publishing/content/pressroom/pressreleases/2014/jan/choosing-wisely-aacn-ccsc.pcms?menu=aboutus



Well done, CVS!

clock February 6, 2014 08:14 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

My very first job was at a CVS store. I worked as a cashier there in high school and for 2 summers during college. As a cashier, I was responsible for restocking the cigarettes behind the counter…not a part of the job that I enjoyed, but it passed the time when we were slow. The area behind the counter was pretty narrow, and I would often have to step over and around cases of cigarettes while working. They sold quickly back then and my hands would smell of cigarettes after an evening of work.

I was impressed when I read the announcement yesterday that CVS stores would no longer be selling cigarettes. What an example this organization is setting, and I am hopeful that this will start a trend among other pharmacies and retailers. 

"Ending the sale of cigarettes and tobacco products at CVS/pharmacy is the right thing for us to do for our customers and our company to help people on their path to better health," Larry J. Merlo, president and CEO of CVS Caremark, said in a statement. "Put simply, the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose."

Along with this news, the company has announced the launch of a smoking cessation plan this spring. 

Well done, CVS! 

According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress, there are 12 cancers and 20 chronic diseases linked causally to smoking. It is encouraging that the prevalence of cigarette smoking has declined from 42% in 1962 to 18% in 2012  (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014), however, it is even more encouraging that smoking cessation programs are continuing to be developed. There is more work to be done to educate the public and help people to not start smoking and to quit if they already do smoke.

More Resources:

Reference:
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014, January). 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014. Retrieved from SurgeonGeneral.Gov: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/50-years-of-progress-by-section.html



World Cancer Day

clock February 4, 2014 02:24 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Today is World Cancer Day and it is inspiring to see the large number of tweets with the hashtag #WorldCancerDay on our twitter news feed! To add to your reading and education, listed below are some of the latest articles published in our journals. All are free to read online and are available for CE credit.

Non-small cell lung cancer: Recent advances 
Nursing2014, February 2014 

 Cancer Pain Strategies and Interventions for Brain Metastases
Oncology Times, January 2014

 Supporting Cancer Survivors
Oncology Times, December 2013

You can find more continuing education articles related to oncology on NursingCenter’s CEConnection.



Go ahead and share!

clock January 21, 2014 14:34 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

 

You may have noticed these new ‘share’ options on each of our article pages. Since we can't all read everything (although I do try!), if there is something that really interests you or that you think will benefit your friends, followers, email contacts, people in your circles, or the like, please feel free to pass it along! I hope this new feature makes it easier to share the content from our journals. 

Any problems or suggestions, you can comment here or email me at clinicaleditor@nursingcenter.com. Thanks!



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