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CEConnection for Allied Health Professionals

clock April 18, 2014 04:34 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Did you know Lippincott has its own CEConnection tailor-made for allied health professionals? This one-stop resource hosts more than 110 continuing education courses design to help allied health workers improve patient outcomes with activities based on evidence-based practice guidelines. 

This platform offers peer-reviewed multimedia and interactive content from Lippincott journals. The platform is also customizable for institutions and individuals. You can track courses using your own My Planner tab, enabling you to add activities to do now or save for later. You are also able to browse courses by categories, including clinical, topic, specialty, and profession. Once you add an education activity, it’s displayed in your planner, as well as your Shopping Cart. 

Allied Health’s CEConnection currently covers courses for 12 professions, including:

Addiction Counselor
Cardiovascular Technologist
Case Manager
Clinical Laboratory Scientist
Dietetic Professional
Healthcare Quality Professional
Pathology Technologist
Pharmacist
Physical Therapist
Respiratory Therapist
Radiologic Technologist
Speech-Language Pathologist

Each month, new courses and additional allied health specialties are added. 

CEConnection for allied health professionals is available for institutional and individual purchase. Healthcare institutions and specialists interested in this platform can get more information by calling 855-695-5070 or sending an email to Sales@LippincottSolutions.com.



NursingCenter’s “Specialty Sites”

clock March 19, 2014 04:06 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Are you familiar with NursingCenter’s specialty sites? In the past few years, NursingCenter has launched two specialty sites, the Evidence Based Practice Network and the Skin Care Network. Both sites feature targeted, in-depth content and each have their own unique features and products. Let’s take a quick glance to learn more about these sites.

The Skin Care Network

The Skin Care Network was launched in 2011 by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. The goal is to share all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media. 

Take a look at some of our features: 

News
Discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items.

Tools & Resources
Organized by clinical topic, pages feature all dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities and patient education tools.

Society Partners
Learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses.

Skin Care Insider eNewsletter
Sign up for our free monthly eNewsletter that offers you the latest on skin care!

Social Media
Look for The Skin Care Network on Facebook and Twitter.

The Evidence-Based Practice Network

Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network is an online resource powered by LWW and the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), which promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to healthcare professionals. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. 

Here are some network highlights: 

JBI Tools

JOURNAL CLUB*
Here, you gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty, as well as the opportunity to share information and ideas with other professionals.

SUMARI*
This premier review software package helps health professionals conduct systematic reviews of evidence of feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of health intervention.

TAP*
Analyze small qualitative datasets following a three-step process of entering data, categorizing data, and building themes. 

CAN-IMPLEMENT*
Tailor your clinical practice guidelines for local use with this JBI tool. 

JBI Library
Subscribe and gain access to JBI’s vast collection of evidence-based resources. 

JBI Continuing Education
Discover JBI’s continuing education resources, as well as their evidence-based practice series. 

‘Show Me The Evidence’ Blog
Stay up–to-date with Lippincott’s blog dedicated to evidence-based practice.

EBP Insider eNewsletter
Sign up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter!

Social Media
Follow The EBP Network on Facebook and Twitter



Free Nursing Resources

clock March 10, 2014 04:41 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Take advantage of our vast collection of free nursing resources on Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com. We know how important your work as a nurse is, and we want to reward your efforts with free nursing activities. From nursing journals to continuing education activities to podcasts, we’ve got what you need, and it’s FREE! 

  • Featured Journal
    Every few weeks, NursingCenter.com presents a “Featured Journal” chosen from more than 50 journals available on our site. Every article in the latest issue is offered to you free of charge. 
  • Nurse’s Choice List
    Discover the top 10 recommended nursing articles selected by our nurse editor. These articles are available to read free online for a limited time.
  • CE Activities 
    All of our journals’ continuing education articles are free to read—you only pay when you wish to earn CE credit. 
  • Patient Education Materials
    Keep your patients informed with our free patient education materials. 
  • Future of Nursing 
    In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released the report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, with the goal to assess and transform the nursing profession. Access articles on this topic for free. 
  • Nursing Tips
    Improve your nursing practice with our free nursing tips, including handy mnemonics, definitions, practice pointers, and more. 
  • Nursing News by HealthDay
    Keep up with the latest headlines in nursing news for free.
  • eNewsletters
    As a member of Lippincott’s NursingCenter.com, you can subscribe to any of our free eNewsletters and get the latest articles and CE activities delivered right to your inbox.
  • Skin Care Network Featured Clinical Updates
    On our Skin Care Network, access our free featured clinical updates from our favorite journal content. 
  • Skin Care Network Image and Video Libraries
    View the latest images and videos in clinical dermatology for free. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Network Featured Articles
    Stay informed in evidence-based practice with our free featured articles. 
  • Evidence-Based Practice Podcasts
    Our free podcasts include evidence-based practice information from the American Journal of Nursing and our nursing conferences. 



The Future Has Begun

clock July 29, 2012 03:38 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

It’s been almost 2 years since the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health and this landmark report is still being discussed and written about. This thrills me! People are hearing and learning about nursing. Other disciplines in healthcare have responded to the report. Nurses are making changes based on the report and sharing their plans and outcomes. Good things are happening!

We have a collection of articles and editorials all about the Future of Nursing Report and in the past few months several good reads have been published. Take a look:

Learn how the nursing staff at one New Jersey health system embraced the report and made changes to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction by reading Responding to Health Care Reform by Addressing the Institute of Medicine Report on the Future of Nursing (Nursing Administration Quarterly, September 2012).

In Nursing's future: What's the message? (Nursing Management, July 2012), the authors share the response of the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Division of Nursing, including “…creating opportunities within our hospital and our professional networks for honest conversation about the report and its implications, and then using strategic planning to design our action strategies.”

Read Wellness Promotion and the Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing Report: Are Nurses Ready? (Holistic Nursing Practice, June 2012) and discover how the role of disease prevention and health promotion, or wellness, is a critical component for nurses in implementing the changes recommended in the IOM report. 

In the NACNS Position Paper: The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists Response to the Institute of Medicine’s The Future of Nursing Report (Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice, August 2012), the NACNS addresses several of the IOM recommendations with strategies and recommendations specific to clinical nurse specialists. 

The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses has also developed specific recommendations based on the report which were published in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing (June 2012) – Integrating the Institute of Medicine Future of Nursing Report Into the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses Strategic Plan. 

There are over 35 editorials and articles that have been published in our journals since the release of the IOM report. All can be read online FREE --- be sure to check out Focus On: The Future of Nursing.  

What changes have you implemented in your practice or career plans? Have there been initiatives at your workplace since the release of the IOM report?



Ghosts in the Machine

clock November 18, 2011 05:21 by author Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC

This blog post is reposted from Show Me the Evidence: The Blog of Lippincott's Evidence-Based Practice Network.

When you appraise research, do you look at who was the principle investigator and wrote the article? I recently attended a session at a symposium that has made me question how I review articles for credibility. Inappropriate authorship (honorary and ghost authorship) and the resulting lack of transparency and accountability have been a substantial concern for the academic community for decades (Wislar, Flanagin, Fontanarosa, & DeAngelis, 2011). For those of you who are unfamiliar with the definitions, an honorary author is someone who is named as an author but did not meet authorship criteria and did not contribute substantially to take public responsibility for the work (Wislar, et al. 2011). A ghostwriter is someone who has made substantial contributions to the writing of the article but was not named as an author (Wislar, et al. 2011). These types of authors call into question the validity and credibility of the published work due to a lack of transparency on what they did or did not contribute to the article. 

In the latest issue of BMJ, Wislar, Flanagin, Fontanarosa, and DeAngelis, explored the issue of ghost writing and honorary authorship in their study "Honorary and ghost authors in high impact biomedical journals: a cross sectional survey."  They used a sample size of 896 authors from the top 2008 high Impact Factor medical journals in the industry, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Nature Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, and PLoS Medicine. Of the 896 authors, 630 responded to the survey for a 70.3% response rate. The prevalence of honorary and ghost authorship in articles published in major medical journals in 2008 was 21% (Wislar, et al. 2011). This number was a decline from identical study the group did in 1996 looking at the same publications. In 1996, the prevalence of honorary and ghost authorship was 29% (Wislar, et al. 2011). 

Clearly, these results demonstrate a need for the scientific community and peer-reviewed publications to increase their efforts to promote the responsibility, accountability, and transparency in authorship, and to maintain integrity in scientific publication (Wislar, et al. 2011). As healthcare providers who depend on the research evidence to guide our practice, we must carefully appraise the evidence to make sure it is credible and trustworthy; this includes scrutinizing the authors as well as the methodology and the research results, before using the information to change our practice. I applaud the efforts of the study authors to educate the healthcare community on the important issue of inappropriate authorship. It is through their efforts and the efforts of authors, editors, and publishers that we can continue to improve the integrity of the scientific publishing industry. 

Reference:

Wislar, J., Flanagin, A., Fontanarosa, P., DeAngelis, C. 2011. Honorary and ghost authorship in high impact biomedical journals: a cross sectional survey. BMJ.



What is your question?

clock October 29, 2011 04:56 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Along the lines of my recent posts on evidence-based practice, I have one more thing I’d like to share. It’s something I wish I had known back in nursing school and especially in graduate school while working on my final research paper before graduation. It’s called a PICOT question.

PICOT is an acronym to help you formulate a clinical question and guide your search for evidence. Using this format can help you find the best evidence available in a quicker, more efficient manner. Take a look:

P = patient population

I = intervention or issue of interest

C = comparison intervention or issue of interest

O = outcome

T = time frame

Try using the PICOT format to help you formulate your next clinical question and search for relevant studies and publications. For example, if you wanted to know the effect of flu vaccination on the development of pneumonia in older adults, you could fill in the blanks like this:

In _________(P), how does __________ (I) compared to _________ (C) influence _________ (O) over ________ (T)?

In patients ages 65 and older,  how does the use of an influenza vaccine  compared to not receiving the vaccine  influence their risk of developing pneumonia during the flu season?

What’s your question? Try using the PICOT format and see how it affects your search results! You can find more information, including other templates to help you formulate your question in Asking the Clinical Question: A Key Step in Evidence-Based Practice

References

Stillwell, S., Fineout-Overholt, E.,  Melnyk, B., & Williamson, K. (2010). Evidence-Based Practice, Step by Step: Asking the Clinical Question A Key Step in Evidence-Based Practice. American Journal of Nursing, 110(3), 58-61.

Woods, A. (2011). Implementing Evidence Into Practice. Webinar. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.



Systematic review

clock October 10, 2011 05:24 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

During my days of nursing school and research classes, we did literature reviews to determine relevant research surrounding a topic of interest. While we did learn about ensuring that studies in our literature reviews were solid, with appropriate sample, design, methods, etc., we didn’t actually compare the findings from the studies with the same intensity that we do today. 

A recent webinar about evidence-based practice (EBP) really cleared up some concepts and terms for me, including the importance of using systematic reviews when examining evidence. A systematic review is an essential component for basing change in practice on current evidence. So how does a systematic review differ from a literature review?

  • Peer review is a critical part of the process. A systematic review looks at evidence reported in peer-reviewed journals and the systematic review itself is peer-reviewed.
  • The evidence is rigorously reviewed, using the same manner and standards that were used to produce the evidence.

We know that changing practice based on one research study is not enough. It’s not even enough to change nursing practice based on several studies. Available evidence must be investigated and interpreted using scientific review methods. A well-conducted systematic review summarizes existing research, defines the boundaries of what is known and what is not known, and helps resolve inconsistencies among diverse pieces of research evidence (Duffy, 2005).

Here’s a good example of a systematic review from the October issue of American Journal of Nursing. As you read Deactivation of ICDs at the End of Life: A Systematic Review of Clinical Practices and Provider and Patient Attitudes, pay particular attention to Table 1 where the sample, methods, and findings of each study are summarized. 

References

Duffy, M. (2005). Using Research to Advance Nursing Practice: Systematic Reviews: Their Role and Contribution to Evidence-based Practice. Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice, 15-17.

Woods, A. (2011). Implementing Evidence Into Practice. Webinar. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.



An equation for EBP

clock October 2, 2011 01:37 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I recently had the pleasure of attending a webinar on evidence-based practice (EBP) hosted by our own Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC. Anne brought the concept of evidence-based practice into a whole new light for me with this simple equation:

Research + Clinical Expertise + Patient Preference = EBP

One research study is not sufficient to support change in practice. Nor are three research studies, or 10, or 100… Solid research is only one piece of the puzzle. Three components are essential to true EBP and are critical to improve outcomes and quality of life:

1. External evidence includes systematic reviews, randomized control trials, best practice, and clinical practice guidelines that support a change in clinical practice. 
2. Internal evidence includes health care institution based quality improvement projects, outcome management initiatives, and clinical expertise. 
3. Accounting for patient preferences and values is the third component of this critical equation.

Another approach to understanding EBP is to compare what EBP isn't with what EBP is: 

  • EBP is NOT a research project. EBP is examination of completed research studies.
  • EBP is NOT simply supporting national evidence-based practice projects. EBP is a complete review and recommendation process.
  • EBP is NOT having research articles as references for policies. EBP is critical analysis of research, in the context of your organization, and with perspectives and judgment of clinicians and patients.

How familiar are you with systematic reviews and PICOT questions? Look for upcoming posts on these topics this week. Also, coming soon is Lippincott’s Evidence-Based Practice Network! We are very excited to be close to sharing this new resource with you!

References

Russell-Babin, K.  (2009). Seeing through the clouds of evidence-based practice. Nursing Management, 40(11), 26-32.

Woods, A. (2011) Implementing Evidence into Practice. [Webinar] Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.



A tour of the Skin Care Network

clock July 13, 2011 03:09 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

I am very excited to introduce our new microsite, the Skin Care Network! This site was developed by the clinical and editorial team of Lippincott's NursingCenter.com in collaboration with the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses. Our goal is to share with you all the dermatology and skin care content from Lippincott's vast collection of nursing journals and keep you up-to-date with the latest research, news, and information your patients may be reading or hearing about in the media.

Here are some highlights of the Skin Care Network that I don't want you to miss:

  • In News, you'll discover the latest research findings and evidence-based practice recommendations, as well as links to related mainstream media items that your patients may ask about.
  • In Tools & Resources, we've organized content by clinical topic, created a page with all our dermatology and skin care continuing education opportunities, and compiled patient education tools for you to share with your patients.
  • In Multimedia, find podcasts of presentations from Lippincott's nursing conferences. More resources will be coming soon to this section!
  • Also learn more about the Dermatology Nurses' Association and the American Society of Plastic Surgical Nurses on our Society Partners page and the Journal of the Dermatology Nurses Association (JDNA), Plastic Surgical Nursing (PSN), and The Nurse Practitioner by visiting the Journals page.

Take some time to explore the site ~ I hope you find the Skin Care Network to be a valuable resource to meet your professionals needs!



The Future of Nursing Roundtable

clock March 28, 2011 03:30 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

On March 22, 2011, the Editors-in-Chief of the top LWW nursing journals got together for a roundtable discussion about the Institute of Medicine and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Report on the Future of Nursing. For those of you who listened in, I hope you enjoyed the conversation about how these nurse leaders interpret and understand the key messages and recommendations from the report. For me, the task at hand is now clearer. It is now up to us nurses to bring our profession and our own careers to the level we deserve. I’d like to share some of what I took away from this discussion.

Anne Dabrow Woods, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, Chief Nurse of Wolters Kluwer Health/ Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and Ovid Technologies, moderated the discussion and reminded me that there are 3.1 million nurses (which is the largest group of health care providers) in the United States and we “need a seat at the table” to “make changes happen.” Anne then went on to explain in detail the key messages and recommendations in the report.

Maureen "Shawn" Kennedy, MA, RN, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Nursing, spoke next about what the Report means to “nurses at the point of care” - which includes staff nurses, nurses practicing in home care, nursing homes, and other areas where direct patient care is occurring. She speaks about professional practice and having a voice when it comes to priorities of care.  Later in the webcast, Shawn talks about the education of nurses being for the public good and she includes good points about responsibility for funding.

Rich Hader, PhD, NE-BC, RN, CHE, CPHQ, FAAN, Editor-in-Chief of Nursing Management and Senior Vice-President and Chief Nursing Office of Meridian Health System gave his take on the report and what it means for managers and other nurse leaders. Some of his great words included “forge partnerships with academic colleagues” and “produce lifelong learning.” He commented on the timeliness of the report and brought up the idea of economic incentive for nurses going back to school. Rich also lists some key ideas for leaders and managers.

Jamesetta Newland, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, DPNAP, Editor-in-Chief of The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Associate Professor at New York University shared her views on the report with regards to advanced practice nurses (APNs). She commented about APNs being trained holistically and the push to move the healthcare system to one of wellness, instead of illness.

Janet Fulton, PhD, RN, Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Nurse Specialist and Associate Professor at Indiana University spoke about clinical nurse specialists in acute care. Her comments about all APNs collaborating with each other to provide inpatient and outpatient care were eye-opening, especially her quote “nursing collaborating with itself.” Another good one…for all APNs to “push the boundaries to meet the public’s need.”

Suzanne Smith, EdD, RN, FAAN, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Nursing Administration and Nurse Educator spoke about the meaning of the report for educators and students. She suggested that we refer to guiding reports from organizations such as the NLN and the AACN. Specifically, Suzanne refers to the AACN’s “call for imagination” and the need for “dramatic change in Master’s education.” This discussion proceeds to the issue of cost.

The entire webcast has been archived and will be available until March 22, 2012. Take some time to listen in to the words of these nursing leaders!



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