Handoffs are a known “trouble spot” when it comes to patient safety. As nurses, we participate in handoffs any time we transfer care to another provider, whether at change of shift, transfer to another floor or unit, or transfer to another facility. Errors that occur during these times can result from a variety of barriers, many of which are human factors, ranging from understaffing and interruptions to fatigue and information or sensory overload. 

The Joint Commission requires a standardized approach to patient handoffs; it is one of the National Patient Safety Goals (2006 National Patient Safety Goal 2E). During her presentation “Effective Handoff Communication: A Key to Patient Safety” at Nursing2013 Symposium, JoAnne Phillips, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS, shared several acronyms that can be used to help guide a well-organized transfer of information and minimize errors and omissions during patient handoffs. 

SBAR + 2 (See also The Art of Giving Report and The impact of SBAR.)
  Introduction
  Situation
  Background
  Assessment
  Recommendation
  Question & Answer

5 P’s Model
  Patient
  Plan
  Purpose
  Problems
  Precautions

PACE
  Patient/Problem
  Assessment/Actions
  Continuing/Changes
  Evaluation

I PASS the BATON
  Introduction
  Patient
  Assessment
  Situation
  Safety Concerns
  the
  Background
  Actions
  Timing
  Ownership
  Next

What is the standard for nursing handoffs where you work?

References:

Cairns, L., Dudjak, L., Hoffman, R., & Lorenz, H. (2013). Utilizing Bedside Shift Report to Improve the Effectiveness of Shift Handoff. Journal of Nursing Administration, 43(3). 

Riesenberg, L., Leisch, J., Cunningham, J. (2010). Nursing Handoffs: A Systematic Review of the Literature. American Journal of Nursing, 110(4). 

Schroeder, S. (2006). PATIENT SAFETY: Picking up the PACE: A new template for shift reportNursing2006, 36(10).