Global Growth in Nursing: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

It’s time for the second key macro trend driving the nursing profession in 2016 – “Global Growth in Nursing.” There are over 21.6 million nurses in the world and this number continues to rise, with most nurses residing in Europe and the Western Pacific. As the profession continues to grow globally, a number of challenges are presented both for nurses around the world and for nurses at home.

Use these Global Growth in Nursing infographics to understand how this macro trend affects you and your international partners. 

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Bookmark our blog and be sure to watch out for the next four trends! Our Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC gave a presentation on the upcoming six key trends in nursing. To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel.

Add this first infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/1-(1).jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

Add this second infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/NCBlog/July-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2/2.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/july-2016/global-growth-in-nursing-macro-trends-in-nursing-2"> Global Growth in Nursing </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>

 

Posted: 7/6/2016 10:11:19 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Mobile Healthcare Applications Part 1: Your Health at Your Fingertips

mobile-phone-630413_640.jpgIf you own a Smart mobile phone, chances are you have downloaded a mobile application (app) or have used one at some point. According to a 2015 Pew Research Study, two-thirds of Americans own a Smart phone and more than half have used their phone to get health information.Mobile apps are software applications designed to run on platforms, such as smartphones, tablet computers and other handheld devices. Apps are downloaded onto your mobile device and are designed to provide consumers with quick access to information and tools with or without internet connectivity. As of June 2015, more than 100 billion mobile apps have been downloaded from app stores and the number of mobile app buyers in the United States is projected to reach 85 million in 2019.Apps developed specifically for health care are on the rise. There are over 150,000 mobile health, or mHealth, apps on the market focusing on various areas of wellness, including fitness, general health and drug information, disease management, telemedicine, and clinical workflow, to name a few. These are available for free or for a small fee and are typically intuitive and easy to use, even for those that are not technology savvy.

Fitness apps are perhaps the most widely used mHealth apps available today. Many of these apps have companion external devices known as wearables that help consumers track steps, weight, pulse, and calories. As a runner, I have used several training apps in preparation for long distance races. These assist in mapping routes, tracking training sessions, and calculating distance and speed. Some provide feedback on performance, while others send motivational reminders to users to get out and exercise. These digital coaches can facilitate healthy lifestyle changes and can be very cost effective to the average consumer, but only when integrated into a regular routine.

General health care apps provide a range of capabilities, such as allowing patients to organize documents, appointments, and medications into a personal file that can be easily accessed at provider appointments and by family members. Others allow consumers to have direct access to all of their electronic health records (EHR) integrated into one place that automatically update with new information, such as medical history, medications, allergies, prior surgeries and procedures, vital signs, changes in weight, and glucose readings via a patient portal. These apps facilitate the sharing of medical records with providers in real-time, which may promote patient safety, disease prevention, continuity of care, and patient self-management.

Drug information apps provide clinicians with medication references, such as drug indications, dosages, contraindications, safety information, and prescription interactions. Apps aimed at improving medication compliance provide patients with reminders to take their pills, how many to take, and when to refill a prescription. Disease management apps help clinicians monitor patients’ health status and streamline communication. For example, there are several apps on the market targeting diabetes therapy. Some simply help patients monitor blood glucose levels, while others provide sophisticated data analytics to the patient’s health care provider and team, along with a patient self-management plan. Telemedicine apps support communication between patients and providers and is one of the fastest growing areas of app development. These apps enable patients to connect with clinicians via video or text consultation in real time. Some healthcare providers are able to refer to specialists, order lab tests and prescribe medications through the app. Others allow providers to make a diagnosis and determine if an emergency room visit is necessary.

Finally, clinical workflow improvement apps streamline communications and data management for nurses and other providers within the clinical setting. These are the most advanced apps on the market, often linking multiple health information systems and improving efficiencies in the workplace. Incorporating mHealth apps into the in-patient care setting, however, involves a high level of commitment, coordination, and resources. Questions hospital administrators should consider when developing a strategy involving mHealth include4:
  1. Do mHealth technologies enhance workflow, reimbursement, and quality of patient care?
  2. Which mHealth apps are approved for recommendation to patients?
  3. When can an mHealth app be recommended to the patient and how would this information be communicated to the health care team?
  4. Who will provide guidance to the patient on the use of the mHealth app, and who is responsible for monitoring compliance and outcomes?
  5. What is the evaluation process for new mHealth apps? How will effectiveness be tracked?
  6. What new skills are needed by clinicians, information technology professionals, and hospital executives to ensure successful implementation of new digital tools?
Integrating mHealth has the potential to improve disease management, communication, and overall patient care. Complete adoption of mHealth, however, will depend largely on:
  1. Payers’ recognition of the value apps provide in health care management
  2. Establishment of standards for security and privacy guidelines that protect patient’s personal health information
  3. Evaluation and regulation of health care apps
  4. Full integration into health information systems4
Technology has and will continue to rapidly transform every aspect of our daily lives. Managing our health is no exception. As mHealth apps become more sophisticated and increasingly ubiquitous in our modern society, patients and consumers will demand higher quality and functionality. We, as health care providers, need to be armed with the skills to adopt and manage digital tools as they will inevitably become an integral part of how we deliver patient care.
 
References
  1. U.S. Smartphone Use in 2015. The Pew Research Center. Retrieved on June 15, 2016 from http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/us-smartphone-use-in-2015/
  2. Mobile App Usage – Statistics & Facts. Retrieved on June 20, 2016 from  www.statista.com. http://www.statista.com/topics/1002/mobile-app-usage/
  3. AJN Reports (2015). The World of Apps in Healthcare: Opportunities and Challenges for Nurses. American Journal of Nursing. 2016; 115 (11): 18-19.
  4. Austin R, Hull S. (2014). The Power of Mobile Health Technologies and Prescribing Apps. Computers, Informatics, Nursing.

Myrna B. Schnur, RN, MSN
 

Related Reading

Posted: 7/3/2016 7:53:25 AM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Technology


Mid-Year Update on My Nursing Care Plan

I hope that some of you have been using My Nursing Care Plan to help you achieve your professional goals and make self-care a high priority. Here’s an update on how I’ve been doing.

Meeting My Professional Requirements

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Well, even as a clinical editor and being very involved with sharing nursing continuing education activities and attending Lippincott Nursing Conferences, I’ve stayed true to my tendency to procrastinate! With an April 30th license renewal deadline, I completed my CE requirements just in time on April 25th. Fortunately, I did get my renewal done in time and avoided fees, however, I don’t recommend cutting it so close!

I have better intentions to keep up with my CE requirements over the next renewal cycle, though, and have already used My Planner to plan upcoming CE activities. Also, I’ll be attending both National Conference for Nurse Practitioners and Nursing Management Congress this fall. I feel like I’m off to a good start!

Being a Lifelong Learner in Nursing

At this point in my career, conference attendance and keeping up with my reading of the latest research in nursing and health care is my main avenue for lifelong learning. In the past, my specialty certifications included CCRN (Acute/Critical Care Nursing) and WHNP-BC (Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner). I know that when I return to clinical practice, I will become certified in whatever specialty my career takes me next.
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With regard to membership in a professional nursing organization, I’ve taken my own advice and rejoined the American Nurses Association, as well as the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association. There has never been a more important time to show your dedication to our profession and I encourage you all to get involved. If you are involved with publishing in nursing, I encourage you to join the International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE). I’ve been a member for years and it’s a great network of nurse authors, editors, and publishers – plus, it’s free to join!

Also, returning to school is definitely in the cards for me in the future. While I know the time will never be perfect, I’m just waiting for it to be a little better! I’ll keep you posted!

Maintaining Work-Life Balance

This part of the care plan has been a little trickier for me, and I wonder if you feel the same? As nurses, we are so used to taking care of others, that self-care is often less of a priority. I am happy to report that since the beginning of 2016, I’ve had a physical, including my mammogram and some other screening tests. I’ve also been working with my primary care provider and a specialist to diagnose and manage a chronic cough and shortness of breath (likely post-viral or adult-onset asthma).

I’m also getting out there and walking and doing my best to eat healthy, which is not always easy with a teenage son who has high-caloric needs to keep up with his sports. My next goal is to add some weight training to help maintain and improve bone density, which we know is critical for women as we get older.
And as for “me time” and managing stress, scheduling time for things I enjoy (reading and gardening, especially) and keeping them on the calendar definitely has helped. I admit that sometimes those times get pushed aside for other responsibilities, but as long as I keep trying and do my best, it’s better than my previous attempts.

How about you? What have you been up to? What’s been the most challenging part of the care plan for you? And, if you have any advice for me, I’d appreciate your support! 
 
Posted: 6/24/2016 10:15:04 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationInspirationEducation & Career


The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and Lippincott NursingCenter – what a pair!


JBI-logo.jpgIf you haven’t noticed already, Lippincott NursingCenter hosts a wide variety of content from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). JBI is a leading international research and development organization based within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. It promotes and supports the synthesis and transfer of evidence-based practice information to health care professionals to support clinical decision-making. As a leading provider of nursing resources based on the best evidence available, it only makes sense that NursingCenter would partner with JBI to provide the most up-to-date and authoritative nursing content. 

Most recently, Wolters Kluwer became the publisher of the JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and 
Implementation Reports (JBISRIR)
, an online journal that publishes systematic 
jbi-cover.jpegreview protocols and systematic reviews of health care research on a monthly basis. I’m actually the digital editor for this journal, and I am proud to say the editorial team behind this content is incredibly dedicated to providing reports that are based on JBI methodology and present the findings of projects that seek to implement the best available evidence into practice. You can find JBISRIR on NursingCenter. For all of the past issues and information for authors, please visit the journal website

There’s also a new JBI CE course hosted on NursingCenter, the Experiences of Heart Failure Patients Following Their Participation in Self-Management Patient Education. Learn how to recognize the components of a self-management education program for patients with heart failure and earn one contact hour. In fact, there’s over 50 JBI CE courses hosted on NursingCenter, including JBI Best Practice, JBI Long Courses, and JBI Evidenced-Based Practice Series

If that isn’t enough, NursingCenter also hosts the JBI tools on our Evidenced-Based Practice Network. The network offers peer-reviewed resources aimed to integrate evidence into practice in an effort to support clinical decision making. The JBI tools include JOURNAL CLUB*, where you can gain access to journals for evidence-based practice targeted to your specialty; SUMARI* a premier review software package helping health professionals conduct systematic reviews, TAP*; which allows you to analyze small qualitative datasets; and CAN-IMPLEMENT*, which tailors your clinical practice guidelines for local use.

NursingCenter is your one-stop shop for all things JBI. Be sure to check back regularly for new JBI content. 
Posted: 6/13/2016 10:49:54 AM by Cara Gavin | with 2 comments

Categories: Continuing EducationEvidence-Based Practice


Learning from Nursing’s Past: Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Infographic]

Wolters Kluwer Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC surveyed the six key trends that are driving the nursing profession around the globe in 2016. The first macro trend in nursing this year is “Learning from Nursing’s Past.” From Florence Nightingale’s time to present day, nurses have shaped their professional skills around what works and what doesn’t. With a high emphasis on evidenced-based practice, learning from the past couldn’t be more applicable today. 

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Use this Learning from Nursing’s Past infographic to promote this trend in the profession and be on the lookout for the next five trends! 

To see Woods’ full Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 presentation, go to the Lippincott NursingCenter YouTube channel

Add this infographic to your website by copying and pasting the following embed code:
 
<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi "><img src="http://www.nursingcenter.com/getattachment/37d222c3-9129-4194-9966-d8f8dda0d1b0/learn-from-nursing-s-past-inforgraphic.jpg.aspx?width=300&height=750” /></a>
  <p>Macro Trends in Nursing 2016:<a href="http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2016/learning-from-nursing%E2%80%99s-past-macro-trends-in-nursi"> Learn from Nursing’s Past </a> By Lippincott NursingCenter</p>


 
Posted: 5/26/2016 9:22:56 AM by Cara Gavin | with 4 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Nursing2016 Symposium and NCNP: Conference Highlights

Earlier this month, nurses and nurse practitioners spent some sunny days in Orlando at the Coronado Springs Resort of Walt Disney World. We learned, networked, and enjoyed good food and fun! I must give props to the conference chairpersons, planning committee members, and meeting planners for such well-done back-to-back conferences. And I was lucky enough to attend both!

The keynote sessions were extraordinary. At Nursing2016 Symposium, Charles Kunkle, RN, MSN, CEN, BC-NA had the audience involved and laughing, while really making us think during his presentation, No Time to Care: Instilling Compassion Back Into Your Care in 60 Seconds or Less. One key reminder for me was that talking to a person as a human being, not a diagnosis, can make all the difference. Mr. Kunkle quickly did an ER admission scenario two ways – first referring to the patient as “the abdominal pain” through the admission process, then again referring to the patient by name. His lively and dynamic presentation style really added to the impact of his message. Also, Mr. Kunkle reminded us that “only 15% of the message that we deliver comes from spoken word.” So, remember, it’s not what you say, but how you say it. Pay attention to your nonverbal and paraverbal (tone, volume, and cadence) communication.

At the National Conference for Nurse Practitioners, the thrill of being in the presence of Loretta Ford, RN, PNP, EdD, FAAN, FAANP was indescribable. Using a Q & A format, conference chairperson, Margaret A. Fitzgerald DNP, FNP-BC, NP-C, FAANP, CSP, FAAN, DCC had a candid conversation with Dr. Ford about her work founding the nurse practitioner profession and her thoughts on the future of our profession. I especially enjoyed her insights for the future, including how “language matters.” She emphasized that the use of the word ‘medical’ is synonymous with ‘physician’ and that we should instead focus on using the word ‘health’ as much as we can. For example, she stated “Let’s reorient from saying ‘primary medical care’ to ‘primary health care.’”

Here’s a look at some other takeaways from the week:
  • “One in ten Americans take SSRIs.”
    Sophia Chu Rodgers, FNP, ACNP, FAANP, FCCM
    ABG Interpretation, Fluid, and Electrolytes
  • “Regarding pulse oximetry…remember to treat the patient, not the number.&rdquo
    AnneMarie Palatnik, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, AVP
    Skill Assessment: Pulmonary
  • “CCF (chest compression fraction) is the total amount of time compressions are delivered relative to the total amount of time of cardiac arrest. The goal is 60%, however, 80% is optimal and achievable when an advanced airway is present.”
    Denise Drummond Hayes, MSN, RN, CRNP
    The Case of the Vanishing Vasopressin: BLS & ACLS Guidelines Update
  • “Joint swelling is the hallmark sign of rheumatoid arthritis that is required for diagnosis.”
    Richard S. Pope, MPAS, PA-C
    RA in 2016: It’s Not What It Used to Be! Or Is It?
  • “You can use any ventilator setting for any patient as long as you understand how it works.”
    Eric Magaña, M.D.
    Nuts and Bolts of Mechanical Ventilation
  • “Mothers taking SSRIs in pregnancy put infants at risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension.”
    Dr. Lana Melendres-Groves
    Acute Care: Pulmonary Hypertension
  • “ST-elevation rules! If you see ST-elevation in a patient complaining of chest pain, assume acute ischemia.”
    Dr. Andrea Efre
    Acute Care: Chest Pain: Refine Your Assessment Skills and Define Your Differential Diagnosis
  • “When someone wants ‘everything done,’ our next question should be ‘what does that mean to you?’”
    Debbie A. Gunter, FNP-BC, ACHPN
    Talking about Dying Won’t Kill You! How to Talk with Patients about Terminal Illness
Here’s a look at my time at these two Lippincott conferences. Hope to see you next fall at NCNP2016 Fall and Nursing Management Congress!

 

 
Posted: 5/25/2016 8:57:58 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Continuing Education


Macro Trends in Nursing 2016 [Video]

Nursing is a fluid and dynamic profession that is constantly changing for the better. In 2016, there are six key trends happening in nursing around the world that every nurse needs to know.

In the video below, Wolters Kluwer, Health, Learning, Research and Practice Chief Nurse Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC presents these trends and offers three learning objectives:

Learning Objectives
•    Identify the factors that are influencing nursing and health care
•    Identify macro trends in nursing from a U.S. and global level
•    Identify ways to meet the changing paradigms of health care on a national and international level

The six key trends that are happing in nursing around the globe in 2016 include:

Macro Trends in Nursing 2016
•    Learning from nursing’s past
•    Global growth in nursing
•    Life-long learning
•    A changing nursing workforce
•    Evidenced-based practice
•    Using technology to improve global health

Watch the video below and be on the lookout for specially-created infographics around each macro trend in nursing coming soon to our blog! 

 
Posted: 5/24/2016 8:36:23 AM by Cara Gavin | with 1 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Wolters Kluwer nursing journals sweep ASHPE awards

ashpe-award_2016-(2).jpgIn 2016, Wolters Kluwer’s nursing journals won 24 times in the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors (ASHPE) awards! Our winners were in the Editorial, Graphic and Online categories, and we are especially excited that Lippincott NursingCenter.com won gold for Best Use of Social Media for National Nurses Week 2015.  

The award-winning nursing journals from Wolters Kluwer are listed below. We are very proud to share them with you! For the full list of award-winners, visit ASHPE’s website

Publication of the Year: Emergency Medicine News

GOLD
Best Feature Article: American Journal of Nursing (Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report)
Best Legislative/Government Article: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (Learning From New York City)
Best Use of Social Media: Lippincott NursingCenter.com
Best Cover Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: Journal of Christian Nursing (After the Trenches: Spiritual Care of Veterans)
Best Peer Reviewed Journal: American Journal of Nursing

SILVER
Best Feature Article Series: Nursing2016 (Pregnancy in Crisis)
Best New Department: Nursing Management (Care Transitions)
Best Feature Article: Nursing made Incredibly Easy! (The truth about human trafficking)
Best Profile: Neurology Now (A leader takes on brain disease)
Best Peer-Reviewed Journal: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Best Special Supplement, Annual or Buyer’s Guide: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Soft-Tissue Fillers and Neuromodulators: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives

BRONZE
Best News Coverage: Neurology Today (AAN's Call for Repeal of MOC Part IV Awaits Action from Credentialing Board)
Best Regular Department: Neurology Now (For the Caregiver)
Best Commentary: The Hearing Journal (Do or die for hearing aid industry
Best Legislative/Government Article: The Nurse Practitioner (27th Annual Legislative Update: Advancements continue for APRN practice)
Best Blog: American Journal of Nursing (Off the charts)
Best Cover Photo: American Journal of Nursing (Faces of Caring: Nurses at Work)
Best Feature Article: Journal of Christian Nursing (See Me, See My Child: Glimpses Into Autism Spectrum Disorder)
Best Original Research: CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing (Social Media: The Key to Health Information Access for 18- to 30-Year-Old College Students)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Computer-Generated: Journal of Christian Nursing (Nursing for the Kingdom of God)
Best Opening Page or Spread: Photo: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing (Womb Outsourcing: Commercial Surrogacy in India)
Best Website/Online Presence of a Publication: PRS Global Open

 
Posted: 5/17/2016 8:28:55 AM by Cara Gavin | with 0 comments

Categories: Inspiration


Nurses ARE the Safety Net!

nurses-are-the-safety-nets.PNGThis year’s Nurses Week theme focuses on safety – “Culture of Safety – It Starts with YOU.”  Immediately many of us think of patient safety, and that’s as it should be – patients come first. We know that hospitals can be hazardous to patients because of nosocomial infections, medication errors, slips and falls, increased stress because of lack of sleep. Because of our around-the-clock presence, nurses have always been the sentinels, shepherding our charges towards discharge with no complications.

The ANA defines a culture of safety “as one in which core values and behaviors — resulting from a collective and sustained commitment by organizational leadership, managers and workers — emphasize safety over competing goals.”  That’s a great concept but not one that every hospital has put into practice.

Staffing, of course, has to be key – how can nurses fulfill one of our most critical functions – assessing and monitoring patients – if there are too few of us to be able to spend time with patients? How can we prevent pressure ulcers and promote return to strength and mobility if there are too few of us to safely assist patients to ambulate?  Patients who’ve been in and out of hospitals – the “experienced” patient – know that nurses are the key to recovery. I unearthed this from an AJN article published in the 1970s:

The patients were then asked what they felt was the most positive aspect of their experience on the intensive care unit as well as the most negative. Thirteen responded that the most positive aspect was “knowing that the nurses were there every minute”; 10 answered simply, “nurses.”

But a true culture of safety has to include our own individual commitment to safety. The 12-hour shift has come under fire as evidence is mounting that it’s not the best solution for nurses or for patients. (We’ve covered the issue in AJN in a March 2014 news article as it relates to fatigue, and also in the AJN blog, Off the Charts.)  The shifts often extend to more than 12 hours, often without breaks; and some nurses may pick-up extra shifts, working four or five straight days of 12-hour shifts. I don’t work in a hospital but in an office,  yet when I’m on deadlines and working 10-12 hour days, my brain is fried after four days and I know I’m not thinking as clear as I should be. I’d be afraid to have that kind of fatigue and have to give medications and make critical decisions with lives at stake.

We know nurses have been involved in auto accidents (In the February 2014 issue of AJN, we reported on a nurse who was killed on her way home) and involved in near-misses on the drive home from long shifts – my sister, a former NICU night nurse, always put the car in park when she came to a stop light after she found herself falling asleep and coasting through an intersection on her way home.

So for this Nurses’ Week, make a commitment to safety – your patients’ and your own.

Shawn Kennedy, MA, RN, FAAN


 
Posted: 5/11/2016 9:41:11 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 0 comments

Categories: Patient Safety


Violence Against Nurses

Recently, there has been growing attention given to violence in the workplace. This new attention is extremely important because previously there was relative silence about violence against nurses and other health care workers, although it happens very regularly in our work settings. Personally, I have worked in a wide range of health care settings, including home care. Safety was a priority in home care because nurses must travel alone, often in unknown areas and situations. Do you know, however, that most workplace violence occurs in the hospital setting, particularly in psychiatric units and emergency departments? According to a recent study, 80% of emergency nurses reported that they experienced some level of violence in the past year, for home care that was 60%. As you are reading this, you may not think this is possible, but I suggest that you answer the following question to see if you have experienced workplace violence.

While performing your role as a nurse in a clinical, administrative, management, or education role, has a patient, resident, family member, or coworker ever: yelled at you, harassed you, threatened you, hit, punched, or scratched you, spit or thrown any other bodily fluid or waste at you?

Workplace violence, according to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), covers a range of behaviors from bullying to committing homicide, and it also covers actions that are from patients or residents who may be fully aware of their actions, as well as those who may have dementia, delirium, drug or alcohol intoxication, or mentally incompetence. Unfortunately, OSHA has no specific standards that they are requiring of all employers to prevent workplace violence.2 What exists is a general duty of employers to ensure safety and prevent workplace injury and illness.2

Quote-Karen-Innocent.pngPreventing Workplace Violence
First, it is very important to understand that as a nurse, or any type of employee, you have a right to be safe at work. Safety concerns at work were taken very seriously since 1970 when the United States Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which set mandatory standards to prevent injury to employees for all types of causes, including violent acts. The OSHA website contains links to several health care and professional organizations and government agencies that provide guidelines for workplace violence prevention.

Recommendations include:
  • Employers should assess and mitigate risk, providing employee training, implementing safety programs, and report incidents.3
  • Your workplace may be at high risk for if you and your colleagues do not have training in early recognition and management of potentially violent situations; your facility does not have policies to ensure safety, like zero tolerance rules on violence, firearms, and carrying other weapons; or if the organization is frequently staffed inadequately and/or lacks security personnel.
  • OSHA relies on nurses and nursing administrators to speak out and report serious concerns about workplace safety, and protects those who report issues with whistle-blower laws.2 
  • Nursing organizations, including the American Association of Critical Care Nurses and the American Nurses Association, have also advocated for protection of nurses from workplace violence and have published position statements on the topic – Workplace Violence Prevention and Incivility, Bullying, and Workplace Violence, respectively.
  • Tap into your member organization for assistance with violence prevention programs in your workplace.
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of those government agencies that has resources to assist employers and workers in keeping their workplaces safe. For example, Workplace Violence Prevention for Nurses is a free course for nurses that is available on the CDC website. With so many factors that contribute to violence in health care settings, there is no single resource or solution that can be implemented to resolve the problem. Therefore, it is best to stay informed about the available resources and perhaps start by reading some of the workplace safety articles on Lippincott NursingCenter.com and take advantage of a National Nurses Week CE Collection discount this week.
References
1. Phillips, J. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in the United States. New Engl J Med. 2016; 374(17):1661-1669.
2. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (n.d.) Workplace Violence: Enforcement. Retrieved on May 3, 2016 from https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/workplaceviolence/standards.html
3. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). June 26, 2014 Recent NIOSH Research on Occupational Violence and Homicide, Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/violence/traumaviol_research.html
Karen Innocent, DNP, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, CMSRN
Posted: 5/10/2016 10:27:58 PM by Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP | with 2 comments

Categories: Patient Safety


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