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Nurse On the Move: Jeff Doucette

clock January 29, 2015 03:45 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

“The number one thing that a nurse can do is guard their integrity as if it is their most prized possession.” Jeff Doucette DNP, RN, FACHE, CENP, understands just how small the nursing community is. Regardless of where a nurse works, their actions and choices will follow them, he explains. 

With a career like his, he should know. Doucette is currently the vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at Bon Secours Mary Immaculate Hospital in Newport News, Va. He is an executive nurse fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, as well as adjunct faculty in the DNP program at Old Dominion University. He is also the chairperson for Nursing Management Congress2015 and on the editorial advisory board for the Nursing Management journal. 

This month, I had the opportunity to speak with Doucette, our next Nurse On the Move, and learn why integrity is a nurse’s most valuable asset. We also discussed why Lean management can improve healthcare, what Nursing Management Congress has planned this year, and what he sees for the future of nursing. 

Listen for the whole interview… Jeff Doucette NOTM_January 2015.mp3 (13.57 mb)

*Do you know a great candidate to be featured for Nurses On the Move? We want to know about the nurses who are advancing the profession and inspiring others to do the same. We will feature a new nurse every month. Email your submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.


 



Celebrate Nursing 2015: Part 1

clock January 27, 2015 06:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Here are the nursing recognition days, weeks, and months for the first half of 2015. Please leave a comment if you know of others so I can add them to our list! Thank you!

National IV Nurse Day January 25, 2015

National Nurse Anesthetists Week January 25-31, 2015

PeriAnesthesia Nurse Awareness Week February 2-8, 2015

Critical Care Transport Nurses Day February 18, 2015

Certified Nurses Day March 19, 2015

GI Nurses and Associates Week March 23-27, 2015

Transplant Nurses Day April 15, 2015

National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month May 2015

Oncology Nursing Month May 2015

National Nurses Week May 6-12, 2015 (National Nurses Day is May 6)

National School Nurse Day May 6, 2015

National Student Nurses Day May 8, 2015

International Nurses Day May 12, 2015

National Nursing Home Week May 10-17, 2015

Neuroscience Nurses Week May 17-23, 2015

Vascular Nursing Week June 7-13, 2015

38th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week June 11-18, 2015

Take some time to celebrate your hard work and be sure to recognize the work of your colleagues too! 



Ace your job interview!

clock January 21, 2015 01:15 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

You’ve landed an interview for your dream job – congratulations! As you embark on this journey, keep the following recommendations in mind. 

Be prepared

Become familiar with the organization and the position you are seeking. Use the facility’s website and other online resources, and talk to any employees you know. Think about how your skills and strengths will meet the needs of the employer and unit. 

Think about your strengths and weaknesses. Write down your skills and experiences, as well as examples of your commitment to team collaboration and quality nursing. 

Practice. If possible, ask someone to perform a mock interview with you. Be ready to answer questions, such as: 

  • Can you tell me a little about yourself?
  • How did you learn about us? Why do you want to work for us? 
  • Can you tell me about your current/last job? Why are you leaving? What did you like most about that job? What would you change about that job?
  • Did you ever have a disagreement with a manager?
  • Can you tell me about your education and training?
  • Can you give an example of a major problem you faced and how you solved it?
  • What's your greatest strength? What’s your greatest weakness?
  • Why did you choose to be a nurse?
  • How do you handle your on-the-job stress?
  • What do patients expect from nurses?
  • What's the difference between mediocre and excellent when it comes to nursing care?
  • How have you solved challenging nursing problems? Or, describe a challenging situation and how you managed it.
  • How have you demonstrated your ability to perform as a team member and team player?
  • What are your long-term goals in nursing?

As you prepare your answers for these questions, remember to focus on the positive, even when faced with a negative question. Be honest and keep your answers work- or project-related, rather than personal. For example, if asked about disagreements with leadership or a coworker, keep it positive by saying, "Sure, we disagreed at times, but we worked well together,” or make sure your example is a work-related one, such as a disagreement over a project due date, rather than a personal one.

Jot down your questions. Chances are, your interviewer will ask you if you have any questions and you probably will! Here are some things you may want to find out:

  • What are the nurse/patient ratios for each shift?
  • Can you please describe the orientation program?
  • What's the career ladder program and policy?
  • Are continuing-education (CE) programs available through the facility? 
  • What's the reimbursement policy for external CE programs, certification, or nursing classes?
  • Will I be tested?

Today's the day!

Think carefully about the first impression you’ll be making. Get enough rest so you’ll be energized and fresh. Dress professionally – conservative is best – and avoid distracting jewelry, make-up or perfume/cologne. Don't smoke, smell of smoke, or chew gum.

Plan to arrive about 15 minutes before your interview. Bring multiple copies of your resume in case more than one person is participating in the interview. Your resume should be printed on crisp white paper for a professional presentation. Also, bring names and contact information for references and employment and education institutions. Turn off or silence your cell phone. 

Greet the interviewer with a firm handshake while looking him or her in the eye, and continue to make eye contact with the interviewer during the interview. Throughout the interview, sit up straight, show interest, smile and speak clearly. Be yourself!

Listen carefully to questions asked and respond in an open, friendly manner. If a question is unclear, ask for clarification. Your answers should be complete, but concise.

As the interview process comes to a close, expect to learn the date when a decision is likely to be made and how you'll be notified. You can ask for this information if the interviewer doesn't mention it. In general, salary shouldn’t be discussed until a former offer has been made. Thank the interviewer and be sure to have his or her name and contact information. 

Follow-up

Within 24 hours, send a thank-you letter or e-mail. Be sure to express your continued interest in the position. Use this opportunity to reinforce how and why you're qualified for the position. 

Good luck!

 

References
Hathaway, L. (2005). Savvy answers to tough interview questions. Nursing2005, 35 (1). 
Rosati, L. (2014). Strike gold when interviewing for your first nursing job. Nursing2014, 44 (5).
Smith, L. (2010). PROFESSIONAL GROWTH: Are you ready for your job interview? Nursing2010, 40 (4). 



NursingCenter’s New Year’s Resolutions

clock January 8, 2015 06:36 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

As we get into 2015, here are some resolutions you can expect from Lippincott NursingCenter!

1. All of our enewsletters are getting a new look! We know that many of you check your email from your phone or tablet; we want to make sure that your are getting the best information in the best format for your device! Here is a peek at our newly launched NursingCenter enews

        

 

2. NursingCenter will also be getting a new look! Stay tuned for an update to our website. Make sure you are a registered member and that your profile is up-to-date. You will get content specific to your practice right on your NursingCenter home page!

3. Want to complete your CE activities while you are on-the-go? We have a new CE app in development, so you’ll be able to complete your CE activities right on your mobile device and then sync up with your computer to download and print your certificate! 

4. Look for more CE collections and Focus On collections so you can easily find topical information and specially-priced offers! 

5. We are also committed to keeping you updated on your license renewal requirements. Check back often for updates for your state CE requirements!

6. We’ve got a line-up of Nurses on the Move to keep you abreast of the great things nurses are achieving in our profession! Remember, you can nominate a colleague, friend, or even yourself by emailing ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.

We are looking forward to a great 2015 and hope that you’ll continue to use Lippincott NursingCenter for all of your professional and clinical needs!



Who are “The Ebola Fighters?”

clock December 10, 2014 07:19 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

They are nurses. They are physicians. They are caregivers. They are scientists.

And as Time’s Person of the Year 2014, “The Ebola Fighters” are “The ones who answered the call.” These are the people who answer the call every day, putting themselves at risk without always knowing what those risks are. These are the people who feel it is an honor and a privilege to care for others during times of crisis and uncertainty. These are the people who thrive on answering tough questions and making tough decisions. 

It is wonderful to see this group recognized for their work. I am hopeful that this recognition will inspire The Ebola Fighters to continue this battle and will motivate others to join as well. We must all stay informed and follow recommendations to keep ourselves, our patients, and the public safe.

Congratulations to The Ebola Fighters – true heroes, deserving of our utmost respect and gratitude. 



World AIDS Day 2014

clock December 1, 2014 09:00 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Over the past four decades, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have evolved from a global epidemic into a chronic disease. Screening methods, prevention recommendations, treatment options, and prognosis have evolved as well. As nurses, we care for patients with HIV and AIDS in every setting, are involved with public education, and participate in research. 

Today, December 1, 2014, is World AIDS Day – “an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died.” Many of us care for patients with HIV/AIDS in our practice, whether we work in a setting dedicated to treating this patient population or not. We must all remain vigilant in staying updated and making sure our patients and the public are informed.

Several articles have been published in our journals over the past year, which I think you will find informative and applicable to your practice. Take some time to review these articles and learn more about HIV and AIDS and improving care and outcomes for patients. 

 HIV Infection and its Implication For Nurse Leaders
Nursing Management, October 2014

The Synergistic Effects of HIV, Diabetes, and Aging on Cognition: Implications for Practice and Research 
Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, October 2014

Wounds in Patients with HIV
Advances in Skin & Wound Care: The Journal for Prevention and Healing, September 2014 

Nursing in the Fourth Decade of the HIV Epidemic  
American Journal of Nursing, March 2014

A Combination Drug for HIV Prevention in High-Risk Groups 
American Journal of Nursing, August 2014

For more reading on this subject, we also have a specially-priced CE collection on HIV and AIDS



Nurse On the Move: JoAnne Phillips

clock November 4, 2014 03:24 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

“Nursing is the toughest job you will ever love.” JoAnne Phillips MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, CPPS, recognizes that hard work can produce gratifying results. As a manager of quality and patient safety at Penn Home Care & Hospice Services, a clinical informatics professional development specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and a doctoral student working towards her DNP at Vanderbilt University, Phillips doesn’t take her role as a nurse lightly. She is constantly looking to improve the quality of life of those around her, which is why she is our next Nurse On the Move

Phillips preiously served as a clinical nurse specialist in the transition, surgical critical care, and patient safety departments of the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her master’s degree in science in critical care nursing from Widener University, and prior to that, she served as a clinical instructor and staff nurse at Hahnemann University Hospital. 

Through our interview, I learned why Phillips chose to go back to school, as well as why she sees nursing as the best job to make a difference in a person’s life. 

Q: What made you choose nursing as a career?
A: When I was hospitalized as a child, I watched what the nurses were doing and I thought that is what I wanted to do. When I was older, I worked as a volunteer in the neonatal intensive care nursery. Then I knew that was what I wanted to do. I can’t exactly say it was a calling, but pretty close. 

Q: What is your favorite aspect of being a critical care nurse?
A: I had the opportunity to work at the Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where I truly learned the impactful role that a primary nurse could play in the patient’s outcome.  Patients could be incredibly sick, and I knew that the best medical care partnered with the best nursing care could lead to the best patient outcomes. As a lifelong learner, I thrived on the constant opportunity to learn more in critical care. 

Q: You specialize in patient safety. What is the biggest concern you have regarding the well-being of patients and how are you combatting it?
A: I don’t think patient safety is one issue, but a virtual kaleidoscope of issues. We need to better understand how systems work together and the role human factors (how we interact with processes and technology). Since humans will always be part of the equation, we need to know that there will be mistakes. Our role as safety leaders is to make it less likely that humans will make a mistake. Something I tell my colleagues, “If we make it easy for people to do the right thing, they will do the right thing.  If we make it too complex, they will do workarounds.” That is often where we see negative outcomes. 

Q: In your role as a clinical informatics educator, why do you feel informatics is important to nursing?
A: I would encourage nurses to work toward letting the computer work for you, instead of you working for the computer. We hear from staff that documenting in the computer is too hard. My response is that we have not designed the system correctly. One of the staff told me it takes eight clicks to chart a dirty diaper – a great example that we have made it too hard. Bottom line is [computers] are here to stay; [they are] an unbelievable resource of information.  Once we have better interoperability (computer systems talking to each other), it will be awesome. 

Q: You are working towards earning your DNP. What made you decide to go back to school?
A: The more I learn about patient safety, the more I realize to work toward a solution, I needed to understand even more about systems. My DNP program is focused on health systems management, and I believe it will position me to take a leadership role in patient safety, to mentor and develop many others to understand how we can create a safe environment for our staff and patients. 

Q: What is the most vital thing a nurse can do to improve their career?
A: To be a nurse today, I think you need to be a lifelong learner. Not just in an academic setting, but through ongoing personal and professional development. There are endless opportunities for nurses to learn and develop – conferences, memberships in professional organizations, online learning.  If finances are a struggle, many of these opportunities are free.   

Q: What do you see for the future of nursing?  
A: Nurses are the solution to the future of healthcare. We spend 75% of our healthcare dollars on chronic care. There is no one better positioned to manage patients with chronic, complex medical issues than a nurse. We need to create an environment that will draw and keep the best people in nursing. What better job is there than to know that you made a difference in someone’s life? Even if that difference is helping them to a peaceful death. As many have said before, nursing is the toughest job you will ever love. 

Do you work with a nurse that inspires you? Nominate them to be our next Nurse On the Move by emailing submissions to ClinicalEditor@NursingCenter.com.



Ebola: Keeping Perspective

clock October 17, 2014 08:21 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

Our NursingCenter team has been following the Ebola outbreak closely over the past months, but with recent developments of disease transmission here in the United States, media coverage has increased and protocols and recommendations are being closely examined. As nurses, we play an important role in patient and public education, and it is important that we continue to act with compassion and skill while gathering our knowledge from reputable sources and keeping recent developments in perspective.

Nina and Amber
My thanks and best wishes for a quick recovery go out to Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, two nurses who contracted the Ebola virus while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, the infected patient who died on Oct. 8, 2014.  I commend your dedication and compassion. I am proud of you.

Nurses and other healthcare providers
To those of you caring for Nina and Amber, those already in or heading to West Africa to help with the outbreak there, and those studying current guidelines and possible systems issues, thank you. I am confident that your hard work will make a difference here and abroad, and that best practices for the safety of patients, healthcare providers, and the public is the priority. 

Stay informed
As a nurse, I will continue to look to professional organizations for the latest information and guidance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a long list of guidelines and checklists for U.S. health professionals. The Global Alert and Response of the World Health Organization includes up-to-date news and facts, frequently asked questions, and preparedness guidance. The National Institutes of Health also lists facts about the virus as well as the latest developments of research on prevention, treatment, and detection. 

I encourage you all to stay up-to-date and share your knowledge with your patients and the public. Refer to the sites above or to our Ebola page on NursingCenter (which we update daily with information from the above sites). Our colleagues at the American Journal of Nursing have also shared valuable insights from a nurse epidemiologist, who addresses the concerns surrounding personal protective equipment, and a nurse informaticist, who looks at the role of electronic health records in handling the Ebola outbreak.

Moving forward
I had the pleasure of spending the past week at Nursing Management Congress and was in the company of over 800 nurse leaders from around the country as the news of Ebola virus transmission in the U.S. unfolded. Themes from the general sessions included a focus on restoring pride in nursing, believing in team members, and dealing with root causes instead of putting out fires. I think these themes are appropriate as we face this new challenge in healthcare. 



CSASWC 2014

clock October 7, 2014 03:58 by author Lisa Bonsall, MSN, RN, CRNP

What a pleasure it was to spend some sunny days in Las Vegas last week for the Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care! From the General Sessions and Breakout Sessions to the Exhibit Hall and Poster Presentations, there was much learning and networking going on! Here are some highlights from the conference…

Clinical Pearls
“Most pressure ulcers are avoidable; not all pressure ulcers are unavoidable.”
What About Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers is Unavoidable?
Diane K. Langemo, PhD, RN, FAAN & Laura Edsberg, PhD

“Forty-five percent of all adverse drug reactions are manifested in the skin.”
Skin and Wound Assessment from a Dermatologic Perspective
Mary Gloeckner, MS, RN, CWON, APN & Jennifer Gloeckner Powers, MD

“Controlled inflammation is beneficial to wound healing.”
MMPs and How Collagen Balances Them to Break the Chronic Cycle of ECM Degradation 
Gregory Bohn, MD, FACS, FACHM & Greg Schultz, PhD

“No wound is going to heal on a swollen limb.”
Navigating Current Practices in the Treatment of Skin Tears
Kimberly LeBlanc, MN, RN, CETN(C) & Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN, MAPWCA, FAAN

Poster Winners
Category: HBOT
Poster #42: Clinical Effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Authors: Supaporn Opasanon, MD, Warut Pongsapich, MD, Dr Med, Sitthichoke Taweepraditpol, MD, Bhoom Suktitipat, MD, PhD and Apirag Chuangsuwanich, MD

Category: Education/Systems/Other
Poster #128: Identifying Cocaine-Induced Necrosis
Author: Nancy Bodycote, RN, BSN, CWCN

Category: Original Investigations
Poster #82: Strict Protocol-Based Approach to Treat Pressure Ulcers in Spinal Cord Injury Patients – An Outcome Analysis
Authors: Umar H. Choudry, MD, Mary Murphy, RN, MA, CWOCN, Ryan Mello, PhD, and Jean Dominique Morancy, MD

Category: Case Study/Series
Poster #77: Surgical Incision Management System with Customizable Dressing Following Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction
Authors: Allen Gabriel, MD and Steven Sigalove, MD

Exhibit Hall

Exhibit hall hours allowed us to connect, network, and dine with colleagues, attendees, and exhibitors. You can see more photos from this event here

 

Hope to see you next year in New Orleans! 

 




NursingCenter Named Top Blog for Nurses

clock October 2, 2014 04:56 by author Cara Gavin, Digital Editor

Last week, NursingCenter’s In the Round was named one of the Top 100 Nursing Blogs by BestMedicalAssistantPrograms.org, and we couldn’t be more excited! Listed among a variety of blogs dedicated to nursing students, RN’s, NP’s, educators, travel nurses, and more, our blog is described as a site “dedicated to helping nurses be the best workers they can be.” Three of our recent posts are also cited as favorites, including:

Directing Nurses Back to Patient Care
Technology and Global Health: A Nurse Presents for the U.N.
Nurses Who Led the Way: Florence Nightingale

We are honored to be a part of this list and to be featured among some of the best blogs for nurses out there. We want to ensure the nursing community stays connected, so here is a list of our favorite blogs for nurses (these are listed in alphabetical order): 

AJN Off the Charts
ANS: Advances in Nursing Science Blog
CorrectionalNurse.net
JParadisi RN's Blog
Not Nurse Ratched 
Nurse Code
The Adventures of Nurse Niki
What Should We Call Nursing 

Thank you to all of the sites that have included us as a top resource for nurses in the past, including OnlineLPNtoRN.org, OnlineColleges.com, CorrectionalNurse.net, LVNtoRN.net, and Jacksonville University’s School of Nursing. We are grateful for the recognition and aim to continue to provide excellent content for nurses. 

What are some of your favorite nursing blogs? Leave them in the comments below! 



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